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Kaiser Schnitzel
Mar 28, 2006

Schnitzel mit uns




Itís....not like cars? There arenít especially huge leaps being made in gasoline powered mower technology, so I wouldnít wait for the newest model to come out. I have a Honda mower and itís great and I think they are pretty bulletproof and fairly fully featured. Mine has the thumb paddle speed control and I love that and it mulches really well. Theyíre not cheap, but they are good.

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Bioshuffle
Feb 10, 2011

No good deed goes unpunished



Kaiser Schnitzel posted:

Itís....not like cars? There arenít especially huge leaps being made in gasoline powered mower technology, so I wouldnít wait for the newest model to come out. I have a Honda mower and itís great and I think they are pretty bulletproof and fairly fully featured. Mine has the thumb paddle speed control and I love that and it mulches really well. Theyíre not cheap, but they are good.

That's good to know! I read that the HRN is a step up from HRR, so I wasn't sure if I needed to hold out for other changes before jumping onboard. I've pretty much missed the end of season sales at this point, right? I might hang out and see what happens during Black Friday sales.

I was eyeing the HRX, but I think it'd be overkill for what I need. The HRN216 is only like 400-500 dollars.

OSU_Matthew
Aug 23, 2010

IT ME




Toilet Rascal

Bioshuffle posted:

That's good to know! I read that the HRN is a step up from HRR, so I wasn't sure if I needed to hold out for other changes before jumping onboard. I've pretty much missed the end of season sales at this point, right? I might hang out and see what happens during Black Friday sales.

I was eyeing the HRX, but I think it'd be overkill for what I need. The HRN216 is only like 400-500 dollars.
Next year we will probably see... new packaging.

Itís already brushless, so thereís the big improvement in power and efficiency right there. 80v is also pretty skookum, and the steel deck is a nice touch.

Otherwise itís basically 18650 cells under the hood and a charging regulator. Same thing as laptop batteries, same thing as tool batteries, etc.

Even the batteries are actually 72v nominal voltage, with 80v being peak charging voltage. Same way Dewalt and others have their 20v ďmaxĒ marketing wank, while itís the exact same 18v systems as everyone else

Bioshuffle
Feb 10, 2011

No good deed goes unpunished



Any tips for pulling out really tiny leaf weeds like bittercress and ? I have a hard time getting them by the root because they just tear right off. I bought some spray weed killer from Home Depot to spray in November, and it didn't do jack squat.

Bioshuffle fucked around with this message at 15:22 on Jan 21, 2021

Daric
Dec 23, 2007

Shawn:
Do you really want to know my process?

Lassiter:
Absolutely.

Shawn:
Well it starts with a holla! and ends with a Creamsicle.


Bioshuffle posted:

Any tips for pulling out really tiny leaf weeds like bittercress and ? I have a hard time getting them by the root because they just tear right off. I bought some spray weed killer from Home Depot to spray in November, and it didn't do jack squat.

https://www.homedepot.com/p/Fiskars-34-in-Aluminum-Handle-and-Blade-with-4-Claw-Weeder-339950-1001/206837521

Sir DonkeyPunch
Mar 23, 2007

I didn't hear no bell


Bioshuffle posted:

Any tips for pulling out really tiny leaf weeds like bittercress and ? I have a hard time getting them by the root because they just tear right off. I bought some spray weed killer from Home Depot to spray in November, and it didn't do jack squat.

If you need something a little smaller, I like something with a forked end like

https://www.homedepot.com/p/Ames-Ergo-Gel-Grip-Hand-Weeder-2445300/300436060

it's good at getting underground and clipping the main root from everything that's holding it down

Kaiser Schnitzel
Mar 28, 2006

Schnitzel mit uns




Bioshuffle posted:

Any tips for pulling out really tiny leaf weeds like bittercress and ? I have a hard time getting them by the root because they just tear right off. I bought some spray weed killer from Home Depot to spray in November, and it didn't do jack squat.

What kind of weed killer? Roundup/glyphosate should kill about anything (including your grass/shrubs-be careful)

Bioshuffle
Feb 10, 2011

No good deed goes unpunished



Kaiser Schnitzel posted:

What kind of weed killer? Roundup/glyphosate should kill about anything (including your grass/shrubs-be careful)
I used this https://www.lowes.com/pd/Roundup-1-Gallon-Lawn-Weed-Killer/1000182245, which is safe for my lawn.

I am assuming it's much too late to use granules, but I'm really kicking myself for not getting on that earlier. It just got too confusing because my back and front lawn are made up of different grasses.

Kaiser Schnitzel
Mar 28, 2006

Schnitzel mit uns




Bioshuffle posted:

I used this https://www.lowes.com/pd/Roundup-1-Gallon-Lawn-Weed-Killer/1000182245, which is safe for my lawn.

I am assuming it's much too late to use granules, but I'm really kicking myself for not getting on that earlier. It just got too confusing because my back and front lawn are made up of different grasses.

What kind of lawn and what kind of weeds do you have and approximately where are you? At least here in the deep south, we get alot of winter weeds that die off pretty quickly and aren't that big of a deal in the summer lawn. I had good luck last yr controlling my creeping charlie with weed and feed fertilizer, but it's usually better to apply the herbicide component before the fertilizer. Sprays hadn't given me good results-2,4D would kill the creeping charlie but also hurt my St. Augustine (it's very sensitive to herbicides). It's about time to put out a granular pre-emergent herbicide here to keep the spring/summer weeds from sprouting.

Auxiliary Treats
Jun 26, 2013


Iím looking to get rid of this birch tree in my backyard. We had an ice storm yesterday that brought it almost to the ground. This happened last season too and over the summer it had about a 40į lean into the neighbors yard.

Iíve never felled a tree before. After doing some reading Iím a little wary about starting with such a heavily leaning tree but it also looks like since birch is so soft there isnít as much to worry about. What do I need to look out for so I donít mess this up?

https://m.imgur.com/a/yUesGw5

E: I just went for it and got them taken down with no issues.

Auxiliary Treats fucked around with this message at 01:15 on Feb 6, 2021

rdb
Jul 8, 2002
chicken mctesticles?

Auxiliary Treats posted:

Iím looking to get rid of this birch tree in my backyard. We had an ice storm yesterday that brought it almost to the ground. This happened last season too and over the summer it had about a 40į lean into the neighbors yard.

Iíve never felled a tree before. After doing some reading Iím a little wary about starting with such a heavily leaning tree but it also looks like since birch is so soft there isnít as much to worry about. What do I need to look out for so I donít mess this up?

https://m.imgur.com/a/yUesGw5

E: I just went for it and got them taken down with no issues.

For anyone else that reads this, the danger here is called a barber chair.

https://youtu.be/EKzvkRnCF58

kicks forts
Feb 19, 2006

cheers

I'm thinking about putting together a general low-impact/sustainable housing/living thread. Building methods like lime mortar, papercrete or recycling glass bottles as floor insulation. Maybe some stuff about permaculture, specifically methods to reduce reliance on pesticide. I don't know if there's a ton of interest; haven't found anything similar apart from the closed Sustainable Agriculture thread.

https://forums.somethingawful.com/showthread.php?threadid=3605954

I have some links of my own, and was going to scour for anything useful from the Wilderness Living and other threads. Does anyone have any other threads to check out?

kicks forts
Feb 19, 2006

cheers

Bioshuffle posted:

Any tips for pulling out really tiny leaf weeds like bittercress and ? I have a hard time getting them by the root because they just tear right off. I bought some spray weed killer from Home Depot to spray in November, and it didn't do jack squat.

Assuming this is in your lawn, it depends on the type of weedkiller and the type of bittercress, for example.

Hairy bitter cress is an annual, which means it dies every year anyway. They spread so much seed that it is probably another plant entirely that is coming up from where you removed them previously. A close cut with a lawnmower or quick scrape with a trowel is probably all you can do, trying to pick them off before they flower and set seed again. eventually you will reduce the amount of seed in the ground and the problem will lessen.

There are perennials such as "wavy bittercress" that may be coming back from roots, in which case;

"With heavier infestations of Cardamine flexuosa apply the herbicide glyphosate (e.g. Roundup Fast Action, SBM Job done General Purpose Weedkiller or Doff Glyphosate Weedkiller), letting the weed grow to flowering stage before application. When using glyphosate take care to avoid leaves and other green parts of all garden plants as it is not selective in action. Used with care, glyphosate is safe to use around the base of non-suckering woody plants, as long as the bark is woody, brown and mature. Glyphosate is not active through the soil and there is therefore no risk garden plants will absorb it through their roots."

Kaiser Schnitzel
Mar 28, 2006

Schnitzel mit uns




kicks forts posted:

I'm thinking about putting together a general low-impact/sustainable housing/living thread. Building methods like lime mortar, papercrete or recycling glass bottles as floor insulation. Maybe some stuff about permaculture, specifically methods to reduce reliance on pesticide. I don't know if there's a ton of interest; haven't found anything similar apart from the closed Sustainable Agriculture thread.

https://forums.somethingawful.com/showthread.php?threadid=3605954

I have some links of my own, and was going to scour for anything useful from the Wilderness Living and other threads. Does anyone have any other threads to check out?
There is a Ďgreen buildingí thread around here somewhere which may be what youíre looking for, but also feel free to make whatever thread/s you want about whatever!

E: https://forums.somethingawful.com/showthread.php?threadid=3865561

Duxwig
Oct 21, 2005



Maybe another thread better, but does anyone have any rounded knowledge about mosses and pathables?

Considering the feasibility of a project to rebuild a small somewhat high traffic path that has large stones to walk on, and seeding around with moss. Moss already grew over the area naturally from being unkept, but lots of debris and crap seems to have killed large patches of it. Plan to maintain it, but was unsure how it would hold up to kids (5 and 3) running all over it. Seemed some types of moss were better than others for this purpose. Before I called the local podunk gardening center who didn't know much, turning to the rusty trusty internet. The moss looks more full higher up, but patchy when you're walking over it; lots of cocoa bean and small pebbles from previous owner just leaving the path as is. I've considered trying to repair the moss which is there, but the path liner needs to be leveled, lots of rocks and cocoa bean debris in the path, and just needs some life. Figured I would take out the stones, reset the path bed level/debris, layer fresh top soil, set the step rocks, then measure off the moss to buy/plant in between.

Thoughts?

a forbidden love
Apr 28, 2005

"It was never meant to beep boop be"

Hey everyone, first time caller, first time listener. I'm hoping one of you gurus can help me out.

I'm going to attempt to terrace out my back yard. I have read lots of articles and how to's online but I still have some questions, and that's where I'm hoping the combined expertise of everyone here can help me out.

I just bought a home with a hill in the back yard. The back yard that is flat is finished with a cement floor now. There is a 3 foot retaining wall (pictures below, swap the green with cement) at the bottom and the hill is behind it, obviously.

What I want to do is terrace everything behind it. I am aware that the next wall behind it has to be 2H units back behind the current wall, and so on.

My confusion right now lies in what happens to the land that I'm not terracing.

Should I do anything to it? Do I *need* to do anything to it?

It seems like the earth I don't terrace to the left and right pose a risk to falling into my yard and worse damaging my neighbors yard. Am I crazy? Will it be stable?

My house is on the right next to the open easement
https://ibb.co/hWJVqtR

AmbassadorofSodomy
Dec 30, 2016

SUCK A MALE CAMEL'S DICK WITH MIRACLE WHIP!!


Is the hill in your back yard going down toward your house, or away from your house?
Whats the reason for wanting to terrace it? Not saying you shouldn't, just curious. are you worried about the slope giving way if its too steep and you get a bunch of rain or something? IANAE but I once had a geotechnical engineer tell me that 3:1 slopes are inherently stable. What type of soil is underneath the top soil?

If you do this the "right" way, you'll probably need a permit from the city, and the permit might require a geotechnical investigation.

a forbidden love
Apr 28, 2005

"It was never meant to beep boop be"

The hill is going up, away from my house. So you go up the slope as you go further into the back yard.

We want to put some plants and maybe a pergola (big maybe since the soil is mostly rocks). Definitely want to put some plants and whatnot back there.

If 3:1 is the way to go then I'm not opposed. I will need to do some calculations to figure out the unterraced wall heights. I'm not sure what they are at 2:1 actually.

I'll have to check again about permits but I'm in San Diego and from what I've read about the area they don't require for walls under 5 ft.

As I mentioned, the soil is rocky. Like reeealllly rocky.

kicks forts
Feb 19, 2006

cheers

Duxwig posted:

Maybe another thread better, but does anyone have any rounded knowledge about mosses and pathables?

Considering the feasibility of a project to rebuild a small somewhat high traffic path that has large stones to walk on, and seeding around with moss. Moss already grew over the area naturally from being unkept, but lots of debris and crap seems to have killed large patches of it. Plan to maintain it, but was unsure how it would hold up to kids (5 and 3) running all over it. Seemed some types of moss were better than others for this purpose. Before I called the local podunk gardening center who didn't know much, turning to the rusty trusty internet. The moss looks more full higher up, but patchy when you're walking over it; lots of cocoa bean and small pebbles from previous owner just leaving the path as is. I've considered trying to repair the moss which is there, but the path liner needs to be leveled, lots of rocks and cocoa bean debris in the path, and just needs some life. Figured I would take out the stones, reset the path bed level/debris, layer fresh top soil, set the step rocks, then measure off the moss to buy/plant in between.

Thoughts?



Have you identified the primary moss species in situ? In my experience moss will survive compression but a tiny scuff or gravel scraping against stone will dislodge it from soil or stone. Removing all gravel and actually reducing overall drainage on the path, with stepping stones for majority foot traffic would be good starting points.

A lawn/moss hybrid is a bit more robust. The grass provides an anchored matting for the moss, and the moss can grow in between the grass. This would allow foot traffic, and If moss is growing there already it is probably damp or poor draining enough. It may require cutting the path depending on the foot traffic; we have trodden grass paths in rainy lush cornwall and the busiest one never really needs mowing.

Unfortunately I don't know how to deliberately create this hybrid lawn beyond sowing utility grass on a mossy patch (people usually spend huge effort to kill the moss because "it's not grass")

You might look into geotextiles that retain some moisture and seed them with moss; the more nooks and crannies, the better chance of moss from regrowing from an untouched pocket if it is scuffed. Would maybe allow a bit more of a 'landscaped' path and would probably be sturdiest as an actual pathway over wet dirt.

kicks forts
Feb 19, 2006

cheers

a forbidden love posted:

The hill is going up, away from my house. So you go up the slope as you go further into the back yard.

We want to put some plants and maybe a pergola (big maybe since the soil is mostly rocks). Definitely want to put some plants and whatnot back there.

If 3:1 is the way to go then I'm not opposed. I will need to do some calculations to figure out the unterraced wall heights. I'm not sure what they are at 2:1 actually.

I'll have to check again about permits but I'm in San Diego and from what I've read about the area they don't require for walls under 5 ft.

As I mentioned, the soil is rocky. Like reeealllly rocky.


Do you know what the current incline is? I can't load your image but worse case is you use the wall material to shore up your side walls to the cutout, or just put some temp wooden pilings and retaining wall until the grassroots stabilise the edges of your terrace. If it is a two or three foot high bank collapsing into your terrace that's just a wheelbarrow of soil, the whole hill shouldn't collapse. That or just cut out the sides of your terrace at a 45 degree slope and get some vegetation established to hold it in place. Then it will even channel rainwater to your plantbeds.

That said, rocky soil is likely to be less stable than soil with high organic content, and if you remove covering plant material it reduces it further.

What materials would you use for the walls?

Edit- and thank you Kaiser that was exactly what I was looking for before starting a thread.

kicks forts fucked around with this message at 04:13 on Feb 8, 2021

AmbassadorofSodomy
Dec 30, 2016

SUCK A MALE CAMEL'S DICK WITH MIRACLE WHIP!!


a forbidden love posted:

The hill is going up, away from my house. So you go up the slope as you go further into the back yard.

We want to put some plants and maybe a pergola (big maybe since the soil is mostly rocks). Definitely want to put some plants and whatnot back there.

If 3:1 is the way to go then I'm not opposed. I will need to do some calculations to figure out the unterraced wall heights. I'm not sure what they are at 2:1 actually.

I'll have to check again about permits but I'm in San Diego and from what I've read about the area they don't require for walls under 5 ft.

As I mentioned, the soil is rocky. Like reeealllly rocky.

Once again, I'm not an engineer, so I can't offer you any "real advice" only a few thoughts on the matter but I do geotechnical investigations for a living. Including for slope stability at houses, though typically the slope is going away from the house, and the people's backyards just got smaller after a rain storm.

How high is the slope compared to your backyard? Its not easy to tell from the pic. Is it taller than your house? You mention that the city doesn't require permits for walls less than 5 feet, but that may only be if its holding back your front lawn from sliding in to your driveway or something. But if you're disturbing a slope that could potentially give way and damage your neighbor's property, then you might need that permit, and an investigation from an engineer with design parameters and all that.

Looking back at your pics, it *looks* like the part you ave marked out (your lawn is the black lines, neighbor is the red?) isn't all that high, but its hard to tell.

You mention that the soil is really rocky. In my experience "rocky" typically involves sand, gravel and cobble/boulders vs. say, clay or silt or something. Have you dug down a few feet? Some people bitch about clay, but its plasticity gives it some advantages, like being harder to wash away in a rain storm compared to sand for example.
Pressure washing sand off my augers is a lot easier than clay

kicks forts
Feb 19, 2006

cheers

Question: I want to build an underground structure into a hillside, is there a way of establishing drainage and water table of a site short of digging a test hole to the depth I plan to excavate?

We are on a granite subsoil with very little topsoil which should be perfect for my purposes, but the land is on a valley which runs from dry but verdant in the summer, to runing a very weak stream in extreme periods of winter rain and soil saturation. While the proposed excavation would have been above the runoffwater level for the last seven years, this winter saw heavy weather combined with agricultural field runoff to open up a second nearby stream above the level I want to excavate to, lasting less than a week, maybe only two days.

I know saturated soil will drain to the path of least resistance, so I had planned multiple poly barriers and French drains circling the structure to divert runoff and dry off the top layers of soil.

If I do dig a test pit, what am I looking for beyond pooling water? It will likely be in the summer, so can I even infer anything about winter drainage/saturation? I'm assuming that anything short of hitting the water table means it will ultimately drain away and not sit around and pressurise into any gaps in between polysheeting barriers.

I believe the subsoil is decomposed granite which compacts to form a hard-wearing path (called Hoggin in the UK, and Raab seemingly exclusively by my father). I had planned to build compacted Earthbag walls, polysheeting lined, surrounded by bagged gravel/glassfoam insulation with a final exterior polysheet. As earthbag polysacking bags are porous, the insulation layer should act as a vertical drain/ soakaway in the event that the outer polybarrier is breeched. But ultimately the Earthbag walls have the potential to draw water from a leak into the structure.


Edit- As I reread this it sounds like an engineering question. I think ultimately I'm just going to rely on polythene sheeting and gravity to keep water out but it feels unscientific.

kicks forts fucked around with this message at 05:51 on Feb 8, 2021

Duxwig
Oct 21, 2005



kicks forts posted:

Have you identified the primary moss species in situ? In my experience moss will survive compression but a tiny scuff or gravel scraping against stone will dislodge it from soil or stone. Removing all gravel and actually reducing overall drainage on the path, with stepping stones for majority foot traffic would be good starting points.

A lawn/moss hybrid is a bit more robust. The grass provides an anchored matting for the moss, and the moss can grow in between the grass. This would allow foot traffic, and If moss is growing there already it is probably damp or poor draining enough. It may require cutting the path depending on the foot traffic; we have trodden grass paths in rainy lush cornwall and the busiest one never really needs mowing.

Unfortunately I don't know how to deliberately create this hybrid lawn beyond sowing utility grass on a mossy patch (people usually spend huge effort to kill the moss because "it's not grass")

You might look into geotextiles that retain some moisture and seed them with moss; the more nooks and crannies, the better chance of moss from regrowing from an untouched pocket if it is scuffed. Would maybe allow a bit more of a 'landscaped' path and would probably be sturdiest as an actual pathway over wet dirt.

I donít know the species yet, we just moved in a few months ago and havenít gone to a local garden store. Iím dumb with plants and didnít initially find any ďmoss peopleĒ which could identify....then found two Reddits to maybe ask when I get a better picture.

What are your thoughts on the plots/sods of moss you can buy in sq fts? Would be removing all existing moss to do. Seemed easiest/quickest way to have heavy coverage, could cut to the right size, donít need to wait to grow/expand?

Edit: Father in law also suggested making a moss slurry to apply everywhere: https://bryophytes.science.oregonstate.edu/page32.htm
Part of me says ďlol what,Ē but the other part of me knows moss are resilient and maybe it would work?

Duxwig fucked around with this message at 15:22 on Feb 8, 2021

a forbidden love
Apr 28, 2005

"It was never meant to beep boop be"

kicks forts posted:

Do you know what the current incline is? I can't load your image but worse case is you use the wall material to shore up your side walls to the cutout, or just put some temp wooden pilings and retaining wall until the grassroots stabilise the edges of your terrace. If it is a two or three foot high bank collapsing into your terrace that's just a wheelbarrow of soil, the whole hill shouldn't collapse. That or just cut out the sides of your terrace at a 45 degree slope and get some vegetation established to hold it in place. Then it will even channel rainwater to your plantbeds.

That said, rocky soil is likely to be less stable than soil with high organic content, and if you remove covering plant material it reduces it further.

What materials would you use for the walls?

Edit- and thank you Kaiser that was exactly what I was looking for before starting a thread.

Just checked the incline, it's about 23 degrees. Not much organic material there right now. I'm going to put some in the future, which is actually part of the reason we want to terrace.

As far as materials I would use for the walls goes, I would have to find out the specifics of what we currently have to keep everything uniform. It looks like regular retaining wall stones, solid core. I couldn't tell you specifically what we are going to use. I can tell you that I'm not averse to any particular material. I would prefer solid stone. I am open to recommendations.



wesleywillis posted:

Once again, I'm not an engineer, so I can't offer you any "real advice" only a few thoughts on the matter but I do geotechnical investigations for a living. Including for slope stability at houses, though typically the slope is going away from the house, and the people's backyards just got smaller after a rain storm.

How high is the slope compared to your backyard? Its not easy to tell from the pic. Is it taller than your house? You mention that the city doesn't require permits for walls less than 5 feet, but that may only be if its holding back your front lawn from sliding in to your driveway or something. But if you're disturbing a slope that could potentially give way and damage your neighbor's property, then you might need that permit, and an investigation from an engineer with design parameters and all that.

Looking back at your pics, it *looks* like the part you ave marked out (your lawn is the black lines, neighbor is the red?) isn't all that high, but its hard to tell.

You mention that the soil is really rocky. In my experience "rocky" typically involves sand, gravel and cobble/boulders vs. say, clay or silt or something. Have you dug down a few feet? Some people bitch about clay, but its plasticity gives it some advantages, like being harder to wash away in a rain storm compared to sand for example.
Pressure washing sand off my augers is a lot easier than clay

The slope top is higher than the attic of my house but not taller than top of my house. The top of the slope is about 14-16 ft high.

I rechecked the permit requirements and no permit is required if the bottom of the first footing to the top of the highest wall is less than 6 ft. So I think I'll start off with that and then get an engineer to do the rest. Unless you guys think that'll just come back and bite me later on.

I've been doing everything by hand right now and I definitely agree that clay would be easier.

A couple of shots of the material I've dug out so far:

https://ibb.co/BrJqv6b

https://ibb.co/MRNNvvX

a forbidden love fucked around with this message at 01:23 on Feb 9, 2021

a forbidden love
Apr 28, 2005

"It was never meant to beep boop be"

While I have your ears, is it okay if I were to extend the terrace tier out past the 1:2? That's the minimum as I understand. I'm playing around the idea of extending the terrace back about 3H or 4H.


https://ibb.co/dbvBtkj

vs


https://ibb.co/FDgGZ9V

AmbassadorofSodomy
Dec 30, 2016

SUCK A MALE CAMEL'S DICK WITH MIRACLE WHIP!!


At this point I will have to bow out as this is getting past what I could advise you on. Only thing more I can say is that based on the pics, that looks really sandy and gravelly. If you're planning on digging (as opposed to say screwing something in to the ground) it looks like you'll need to do a fair bit of shoring to keep any holes or trenches from caving in on you. Not just for safety sake (definitely for that though), but even just so you can say, pour cement or otherwise put down whatever you need for building the walls.

a forbidden love
Apr 28, 2005

"It was never meant to beep boop be"

wesleywillis posted:

At this point I will have to bow out as this is getting past what I could advise you on. Only thing more I can say is that based on the pics, that looks really sandy and gravelly. If you're planning on digging (as opposed to say screwing something in to the ground) it looks like you'll need to do a fair bit of shoring to keep any holes or trenches from caving in on you. Not just for safety sake (definitely for that though), but even just so you can say, pour cement or otherwise put down whatever you need for building the walls.

No worries, I really appreciate the input though. I was hoping this might be done easily but I might have to fork up the money to get it done right

kicks forts
Feb 19, 2006

cheers

a forbidden love posted:

No worries, I really appreciate the input though. I was hoping this might be done easily but I might have to fork up the money to get it done right

I'm having trouble visualising your descriptions, but if you can plot out the slope on some graph paper you should be able to roughly calculate the length and depths you can opt for to match the slope.

Multiple shallow terraces, a foot or so tall, would be less risky in extreme weather. You could even build up shallow terraces on top of the existing slope, just scrape away the turf and add new topsoil if the soil is poor to begin with. Wooden posts and timber retaining walls would probably last a decent time in well draining rocky soil, and would give you a chance to play around and build it permanently once you have an idea of successes/problems.

The worst case with building the terrace up is you get some wet topsoil at the bottom rather than a rockslide if you churn up the subsoil.

Bloody
Mar 3, 2013



I live in the greater seattle area. how do I get rid of all of these dang blackberries and ivy. I have a kind of unimpressive corded weedwhacker should I just get something beefier and go hog wild

also if this doesn't count as landscaping just holler

Kaiser Schnitzel
Mar 28, 2006

Schnitzel mit uns




Bloody posted:

I live in the greater seattle area. how do I get rid of all of these dang blackberries and ivy. I have a kind of unimpressive corded weedwhacker should I just get something beefier and go hog wild

also if this doesn't count as landscaping just holler
Glyphosate/roundup. Or be prepared to pull them 2-3x/yr every year for 3-4 years.

Solkanar512
Dec 28, 2006



Bloody posted:

I live in the greater seattle area. how do I get rid of all of these dang blackberries and ivy. I have a kind of unimpressive corded weedwhacker should I just get something beefier and go hog wild

also if this doesn't count as landscaping just holler

Here's the King County Noxious Weed site, they've got some great hints on this issue. Glyphosate is part of it, but you're going to have to do it multiple times to exhaust the roots and ensure that all the canes are disposed of in a manner such that they don't touch soil until their completely dried out.

Question - I'm having a new fence put in, with standard 8' sections. I'd like to mount trellises post to post, so that every other section has one. Where do I find something like this? What sort of things should I keep in mind to ensure I don't damage the fence itself and have something nice and long lasting? EDIT: These trellises would cover most of the 8'x6' panel, not the type of trellises you put on top of the fence.

I'm thinking of growing stuff like sweet peas or nasturtiums and the like out of containers at the base of the fence, so nothing too crazy.

Solkanar512 fucked around with this message at 01:55 on Feb 24, 2021

Twlight
Feb 18, 2005

I brag about getting free drinks from my boss to make myself feel superior

Fun Shoe

With warm wether around the corner for my zone. Is there a preferred weed treatment I can spread to inhibit weed growth this year? Should I mix with milagranite as well for an early April application?

Motronic
Nov 6, 2009


MOTRONIC FOR MODERATOR, MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN


Grimey Drawer

Twlight posted:

With warm wether around the corner for my zone. Is there a preferred weed treatment I can spread to inhibit weed growth this year? Should I mix with milagranite as well for an early April application?

For what? Turf?

Twlight
Feb 18, 2005

I brag about getting free drinks from my boss to make myself feel superior

Fun Shoe

Motronic posted:

For what? Turf?

Sorry about that I was phone posting and should have provided more details. It is just normal grass, and im in zone 6.

Motronic
Nov 6, 2009


MOTRONIC FOR MODERATOR, MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN


Grimey Drawer

Twlight posted:

Sorry about that I was phone posting and should have provided more details. It is just normal grass, and im in zone 6.

A pretty "standard" selective herbicide mix for turf is Surge (https://www.domyown.com/surge-broadleaf-herbicide-for-turf-p-2296.html)

You should get a soil test done rather than doing spray-and-pray fertilizer. You likely need nitrogen, you probably need potassium. How much? Who knows until you get test results.

Twlight
Feb 18, 2005

I brag about getting free drinks from my boss to make myself feel superior

Fun Shoe

Motronic posted:

A pretty "standard" selective herbicide mix for turf is Surge (https://www.domyown.com/surge-broadleaf-herbicide-for-turf-p-2296.html)

You should get a soil test done rather than doing spray-and-pray fertilizer. You likely need nitrogen, you probably need potassium. How much? Who knows until you get test results.

understood thank you for the advice!

mcgreenvegtables
Nov 2, 2004
Yum!

Just came in here to ask about pre-emergent for turf as well. Mostly looking for something to put down to prevent crabgrass, which gets pretty out of hand. I also get a bunch of clover in a couple of spots. I am in Zone 6b.

Would something like this work: https://www.domyown.com/048-barricade-on-dg-pro-sgn150-50-lb-p-21470.html?sub_id=22883

Am I better off spraying or is something spreadable okay? I'd rather spread if I can get away with it.

Motronic
Nov 6, 2009


MOTRONIC FOR MODERATOR, MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN


Grimey Drawer

I don't use preemergents so I can't comment on that one.

I can tell you that I spray, even when it's more expensive, because it convenient. I'm dealing with over an acre of grass and I have a spray cart that gets towed behind something.

As far as clover, I'm gonna go ahead and send you too out to get some soil samples done. You are almost definitely VERY low on nitrogen. So rather than fighting what you've got you should make your soil good at growing what you want.

devmd01
Mar 7, 2006

Elektronik
Supersonik


Man, I just pay someone. I donít give two shits about what nutrients, etc need to go on as well as keeping track of when it does. gently caress a tru-green tho, Iím with a local company that does organic only.

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mcgreenvegtables
Nov 2, 2004
Yum!

I am filling out the soil sample paperwork now, definitely excited to see what they recommend.

Spread seems easier for me because I have a pretty small lawn and an appropriately sized spreader, but just a tiny hand sprayer I use to spraying my foundation for carpenter ants. If it was a serious advantage to spraying I might go buy something better, but I'd rather not be walking around my ~2500sqft or turf waving a tiny little wand with a 6" pattern.

I paid someone last year. It was super cheap and convenient, but they came and blasted my lawn with who knows what nonsense mix of fertilizer and weed killer on a monthly basis. If I could find a company to actually base my program on soil tests and not come every month (seems excessive), I'd sign up for sure.

Funny about the nitrogen though, I imagine that is what the fertilizer service was dumping way too much of on my lawn monthly. Curious to see what the results come back with.

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