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Motronic
Nov 6, 2009


MOTRONIC FOR MODERATOR, MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN


Grimey Drawer

devmd01 posted:

Somewhat proud of this sod install. Previously, this entire area was a small rock bed on top of our wonderful central Indiana clay. Dug all the embedded rock and clay down 4+Ē, put topsoil down, then laid in sod once it arrived at the garden center. Managed to get it done in almost exactly 3 rolls with a tiny bit of excess. Now to move on to the other 7 rolls and where I need to repeat the process...



Nice!

Water, water, water. It needs a ton right now to recover.

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Hed
Mar 31, 2004



Fun Shoe

Is Flexzilla a good brand for garden hoses? Are other brandsí compact hoses a gimmick?

I have a large yard with no spigots near the back so want a 3/4Ē x 100í. Trying to decide if something that sits outside all summer is a replace every X years regardless of initial quality or what.

spencer for hire
Jan 27, 2006

we just want to dance here, someone stole the stage
they call us irresponsible, write us off the page


Just picked up a used commercial 40Ē Toro walk behind from a guy who only put approximately 250 hours on it. Took it out this morning even though the yard was a little soggy and it ran like a champ.

Which leads me to a bigger question- does anyone have any tips on identifying drainage issues? My yard is sloped all over the place and has serious soggy spots days after the last rain. Even the top of the yard where the grade starts can get real soggy. Iím having a surveyor come out and do some topography but I was wondering if there was more I can do in the meantime to research solutions. Iím leaning towards embracing the soggiest portion and adding a rain garden

Fitzy Fitz
May 14, 2005






Hed posted:

Is Flexzilla a good brand for garden hoses? Are other brands’ compact hoses a gimmick?

I have a large yard with no spigots near the back so want a 3/4” x 100’. Trying to decide if something that sits outside all summer is a replace every X years regardless of initial quality or what.

Not sure if I've bought that brand, but I haven't found one that lasts.

IOwnCalculus
Apr 2, 2003





Hed posted:

Is Flexzilla a good brand for garden hoses? Are other brands’ compact hoses a gimmick?

I have a large yard with no spigots near the back so want a 3/4” x 100’. Trying to decide if something that sits outside all summer is a replace every X years regardless of initial quality or what.

I have a few of their short leader hoses for use with my pressure washer and they seem very well made. The one that does stay outside 24x7 is noticeably faded compared to the ones that stay in the garage, but it doesn't feel like the hose material itself has degraded much.

Yooper
Apr 30, 2012



Grimey Drawer

Hed posted:

Is Flexzilla a good brand for garden hoses? Are other brandsí compact hoses a gimmick?

I have a large yard with no spigots near the back so want a 3/4Ē x 100í. Trying to decide if something that sits outside all summer is a replace every X years regardless of initial quality or what.

I've got a 50' Flexzilla and it seems fine. It gets super flexy in the heat and sun. It doesn't seem any more or less lovely then the other mid tier garden hoses I have. I've only had it two summers, not sure what to expect on durability.

csammis
Aug 26, 2003

Mental Institution

Is there a brand of solar powered garden lights (path lighting specifically) that is recommended over others in terms of longevity? It has been something like twelve years since I last purchased any - probably a big box hardware store house brand but I donít really remember - and they were dim and/or dead within a season. Iíd like to get something that doesnít become e-waste in a year or two if possible.

Wallet
Jun 19, 2006



Yooper posted:

I've got a 50' Flexzilla and it seems fine. It gets super flexy in the heat and sun. It doesn't seem any more or less lovely then the other mid tier garden hoses I have. I've only had it two summers, not sure what to expect on durability.

Are we talking about expanding hoses or just extra flexible ones?

I have two expanding hoses (a 50' and a 100') both of which seem to have held up just fine for the year and a half I've had them though I'm sure they will eventually break. I think I just picked the best reviewed (not bargain basement cheap) ones on Amazon. My neighbor got some of the super cheap (like $20) ones at an Ocean State Job Lot or some other discount retailer last year and both of them popped within two days so probably don't do that.


csammis posted:

Is there a brand of solar powered garden lights (path lighting specifically) that is recommended over others in terms of longevity? It has been something like twelve years since I last purchased any - probably a big box hardware store house brand but I donít really remember - and they were dim and/or dead within a season. Iíd like to get something that doesnít become e-waste in a year or two if possible.

I'd also be interested to know this. I got some ultra cheap ones ($20 for a 12 pack I think?) before the winter to try out because I'm too lazy to take them inside every year and interestingly they have all survived unscathed. They use regular rear end rechargeable AAA batteries that are easy to replace so until the electronics die I imagine they'll be fine. When I was looking around the ones that were 2-3x as expensive all seemed to be nearly identical in construction so I wonder what you really get for the money.

Yooper
Apr 30, 2012



Grimey Drawer

Wallet posted:

Are we talking about expanding hoses or just extra flexible ones?


Extra flexible ones. I've seen a lot of people try the expanding ones because it sounds awesome, but the service life is a bit lacking.

Hypnolobster
Apr 12, 2007

What this sausage party needs is a big dollop of ketchup! Too bad I didn't make any.


Expanding hoses aren't great for regular/normal garden hose use, but they do absolutely rule for quick stuff close to the spigot, as well as stuff off of a utility tub.

devmd01
Mar 7, 2006

Elektronik
Supersonik


That was a hell of a lot of work for a little bit of extra grass but the rock bed was way too big. At least I put a border in while I was at it.





mcgreenvegtables
Nov 2, 2004
Yum!

That looks great, nice job!

This reminds me though, does anyone have experience with installing metal edging to define beds? I am having trouble keeping a rock bed and mulch bed neatly defined in a location I have zero ability to build up the grade. Are there particular systems that work well? I want it to be thick enough that it will hold up for a long time, but it also needs to be able to take a decent curve.

Motronic
Nov 6, 2009


MOTRONIC FOR MODERATOR, MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN


Grimey Drawer

mcgreenvegtables posted:

This reminds me though, does anyone have experience with installing metal edging to define beds? I am having trouble keeping a rock bed and mulch bed neatly defined in a location I have zero ability to build up the grade. Are there particular systems that work well? I want it to be thick enough that it will hold up for a long time, but it also needs to be able to take a decent curve.

In my experience none of those systems work particularly well or are very durable because by their very nature you are trying to do something that needs a footing with something you can just hammer into the ground.

Ignore this if you are in a area that never freezes, but the only edging I've ever seen stay is something like stone that been excavated several inches below grade (not necessarily the frost line which would be nuts in a lot of places) and then wet set stone/cobbles/whatever. Or metal for that matter. But the problem in places with frost heave is that you need something more substantial to keep it from failing inside of 5 years.

Wallet
Jun 19, 2006



Motronic posted:

Ignore this if you are in a area that never freezes, but the only edging I've ever seen stay is something like stone that been excavated several inches below grade (not necessarily the frost line which would be nuts in a lot of places) and then wet set stone/cobbles/whatever. Or metal for that matter. But the problem in places with frost heave is that you need something more substantial to keep it from failing inside of 5 years.

The stuff you get in strips doesn't seem to stand up very well (whether it's metal or plastic). I'd just go with actual concrete edging; not the stupid kind that's poured to look like rocks or weird conjoined brick patterns and just sits on top of the soil, the kind that has an A and a B that interlock. The ones that are trapezoidal make it easy to put in whatever kinds of curves you want (you may have to look at their websites/documentation to find out what the minimum radius of a given type is to make sure it will fit if you have really tight curves) and they generally go deep enough to stay in place even with freeze/thaw cycles.

Motronic
Nov 6, 2009


MOTRONIC FOR MODERATOR, MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN


Grimey Drawer

That's generally EP Henry type reconstituted stone and I absolute hate the look so I'm super biased. It's also typically held together with adhesive at least around here. That is just as durable as you're probably thinking.

surf rock
Aug 12, 2007



For the past few years, I've been lucky enough to live next door to friends. We've had an arrangement where I weedwhacked both properties and they mowed both properties. Unfortunately, they're moving in the next month, so I need to get my own mower. Here's the thing:

- I hate mowing
- I don't hate mowing enough to blow a hundred bucks a month or more, based on local prices, on having someone else do it
- Especially because my lot is literally less than 6,000 square feet (the grass portion would probably be ~4,500) and flat

I've thought about getting a reel mower because it's a small enough yard that that's probably feasible, but I was reading about them and it sounds like if you're not using them twice a week then they'll be useless because they can't handle long grass. Does anyone use one and would recommend it? I like the concept, but it seems like you really have to have the absolute perfect situation (and a truly obsessive love of your yard) for it to be worthwhile.

So, I'm mainly thinking of getting an electric mower instead. It's a little expensive, but I'd love the lack of maintenance issues and the cordlessness of their top pick. Anyone here have any negative experiences with electric mowers?

mcgreenvegtables
Nov 2, 2004
Yum!

Wallet posted:

The stuff you get in strips doesn't seem to stand up very well (whether it's metal or plastic). I'd just go with actual concrete edging; not the stupid kind that's poured to look like rocks or weird conjoined brick patterns and just sits on top of the soil, the kind that has an A and a B that interlock. The ones that are trapezoidal make it easy to put in whatever kinds of curves you want (you may have to look at their websites/documentation to find out what the minimum radius of a given type is to make sure it will fit if you have really tight curves) and they generally go deep enough to stay in place even with freeze/thaw cycles.

Fabricated materials like that aren't going to work for my taste (or the taste of the historic commission that gets to tell me what I can do with my property), unfortunately. I am not opposed to doing something silly like tying edge banding into some footings if that is what it takes to do it right. But this definitely pushes the project lower on my priority list, was hoping this could be an easy fix.

mcgreenvegtables
Nov 2, 2004
Yum!

surf rock posted:

For the past few years, I've been lucky enough to live next door to friends. We've had an arrangement where I weedwhacked both properties and they mowed both properties. Unfortunately, they're moving in the next month, so I need to get my own mower. Here's the thing:

- I hate mowing
- I don't hate mowing enough to blow a hundred bucks a month or more, based on local prices, on having someone else do it
- Especially because my lot is literally less than 6,000 square feet (the grass portion would probably be ~4,500) and flat

I've thought about getting a reel mower because it's a small enough yard that that's probably feasible, but I was reading about them and it sounds like if you're not using them twice a week then they'll be useless because they can't handle long grass. Does anyone use one and would recommend it? I like the concept, but it seems like you really have to have the absolute perfect situation (and a truly obsessive love of your yard) for it to be worthwhile.

So, I'm mainly thinking of getting an electric mower instead. It's a little expensive, but I'd love the lack of maintenance issues and the cordlessness of their top pick. Anyone here have any negative experiences with electric mowers?

I think electric mowers are great for small lawns. I have a 40V Ryobi and it kind of sucks, but I still wouldn't go back to gas. The Ego is supposed to be good, and there is a poster here who is very happy with their Kobalt 80V mower. Keep in mind batteries are expensive and don't last forever, but it's a whole lot easier to replace them than deal with carbs, ethanol-free gas, oil changes, etc.

Fitzy Fitz
May 14, 2005






surf rock posted:

So, I'm mainly thinking of getting an electric mower instead. It's a little expensive, but I'd love the lack of maintenance issues and the cordlessness of their top pick. Anyone here have any negative experiences with electric mowers?

Be sure the battery has enough power to get you through the whole yard in one charge, or buy a second battery. It sucks having to take a charge break mid-mow.

SpaceCadetBob
Dec 27, 2012


Ill jump in and say i love my toro battery mower.

Was so happy with it that when winter came i got the electric snowblower which im also super happy with.

Aint ever going back to gas. Both devices are crazy quiet and crazy light weight.

FogHelmut
Dec 18, 2003

Your authority is not recognized in Fort Kickass.


One of my inground sprinkler heads is getting stuck about partial way up. I thought there might be some dirt in there and I pumped it up and down a bunch of times while it was running but it didn't help. I know that the pressure is not an issue. Any other ideas or suggestions short of digging the whole thing out and replacing it?

cakesmith handyman
Jul 22, 2007

Pip-Pip old chap! Last one in is a rotten egg what what.



surf rock posted:

- I hate mowing
- I don't hate mowing enough to blow a hundred bucks a month or more, based on local prices, on having someone else do it
- Especially because my lot is literally less than 6,000 square feet (the grass portion would probably be ~4,500) and flat

Enslave a robot to do it for you?

The Dave
Sep 9, 2003



Iím slowly going to redo all our beds with stacked timberís for borders and mostly 90 degree bends and I canít freaking wait.

NomNomNom
Jul 20, 2008
Please Work Out

I also plan on using stacked timbers, with rebar pounded through to help anchor it all.

Re: mower chat, I've been very happy with my ryobi 40v mower for the last two years. Does my 6000 sq ft yard with a single 4ah battery. Was like $200 and has never needed any maintenance.

Wallet
Jun 19, 2006



mcgreenvegtables posted:

Fabricated materials like that aren't going to work for my taste (or the taste of the historic commission that gets to tell me what I can do with my property), unfortunately. I am not opposed to doing something silly like tying edge banding into some footings if that is what it takes to do it right. But this definitely pushes the project lower on my priority list, was hoping this could be an easy fix.

Buh? Having lived in a historic district if they're genuinely disallowing brick colored concrete that's some crazy poo poo.

FogHelmut posted:

One of my inground sprinkler heads is getting stuck about partial way up. I thought there might be some dirt in there and I pumped it up and down a bunch of times while it was running but it didn't help. I know that the pressure is not an issue. Any other ideas or suggestions short of digging the whole thing out and replacing it?

Depending on the brand you can likely take off at least the top of the casing which might let you see what's wrong with it.

Yooper
Apr 30, 2012



Grimey Drawer

surf rock posted:


So, I'm mainly thinking of getting an electric mower instead. It's a little expensive, but I'd love the lack of maintenance issues and the cordlessness of their top pick. Anyone here have any negative experiences with electric mowers?

I had a reel mower. It wasn't bad but anything thicker than a stalk of grass seemed to jam it. My yard was small but contained a birch, ash, and maple. So every twig had to be picked up otherwise the reel would jam. It also kind of sucked around any sort of obstruction as your momentum would come to zero and you'd have to huff and puff it back and forth to clean up a little area.

FogHelmut
Dec 18, 2003

Your authority is not recognized in Fort Kickass.


surf rock posted:

For the past few years, I've been lucky enough to live next door to friends. We've had an arrangement where I weedwhacked both properties and they mowed both properties. Unfortunately, they're moving in the next month, so I need to get my own mower. Here's the thing:

- I hate mowing
- I don't hate mowing enough to blow a hundred bucks a month or more, based on local prices, on having someone else do it
- Especially because my lot is literally less than 6,000 square feet (the grass portion would probably be ~4,500) and flat

I've thought about getting a reel mower because it's a small enough yard that that's probably feasible, but I was reading about them and it sounds like if you're not using them twice a week then they'll be useless because they can't handle long grass. Does anyone use one and would recommend it? I like the concept, but it seems like you really have to have the absolute perfect situation (and a truly obsessive love of your yard) for it to be worthwhile.

So, I'm mainly thinking of getting an electric mower instead. It's a little expensive, but I'd love the lack of maintenance issues and the cordlessness of their top pick. Anyone here have any negative experiences with electric mowers?

I had a 40v Black and Decker and it was fine for thin fescue. It bogged down in thicker grass and didn't mulch well.

I bought a 80v Kobalt used and it's almost like a gas mower. It cuts everything, never bogs down, but doesn't mulch well if the grass gets too long. I only have about 1200 sq ft of grass or so, I get 3-4 uses out of a battery. Folds up easily for vertical storage.

Only complaint is that it's as heavy as a gas mower. Fit and finish on the plug for the bag spot on the rear of the mower isn't great and collects grass and leaks them everywhere when it's dry. I'd recommend cleaning it every time you cut, or storing it somewhere you don't mind getting dirty.

Bear in mind, I have the old model. Not sure what updates the newer one has.

SpartanIvy
May 18, 2007


Hair Elf

I've got the EGO Select Cut mower and I love it. I've used almost every EGO mower to date and it's definitely worth the premium from the single blade model if you have a lot of leaves come Fall. On just grass they both perform great.

Its quiet, light weight, and doesn't vibrate or smoke. It makes lawn mowing much nicer. My girlfriend hates mowing with a passion but liked my EGO enough to buy one for her house and gave away her gas mower. My mother and brother also got one and love them too.

A+++ would recommend electric lawn equipment.

surf rock
Aug 12, 2007



Terrific! OK, I'm sold on getting the electric mower. Thanks, everyone!

One follow-up question: does anyone know what this tree is?





It flowers for a little bit each spring and is generally leafy through the summer/fall. Outside of the brief flowering stage, it looks pretty bad and I don't like it. It also blocks the view of the much nicer tree near the house (which I also don't know the identify of).

I could cut it down in a few minutes, but I don't know whether the roots will be too deep for me to dig up easily and I'd love to get more info.

Fitzy Fitz
May 14, 2005






Looks like a cherry? The tree behind it is entirely too close to the house unless the perspective is distorting the distance..

Motronic
Nov 6, 2009


MOTRONIC FOR MODERATOR, MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN


Grimey Drawer

Looks like a dogwood.

Easy enough to dig out a stump that size, but with a machine (miniex). You'll need soil to backfill.

Or cut it off near the ground and stump grind it.

devicenull
May 30, 2007



Grimey Drawer

surf rock posted:

For the past few years, I've been lucky enough to live next door to friends. We've had an arrangement where I weedwhacked both properties and they mowed both properties. Unfortunately, they're moving in the next month, so I need to get my own mower. Here's the thing:

- I hate mowing
- I don't hate mowing enough to blow a hundred bucks a month or more, based on local prices, on having someone else do it
- Especially because my lot is literally less than 6,000 square feet (the grass portion would probably be ~4,500) and flat

I've thought about getting a reel mower because it's a small enough yard that that's probably feasible, but I was reading about them and it sounds like if you're not using them twice a week then they'll be useless because they can't handle long grass. Does anyone use one and would recommend it? I like the concept, but it seems like you really have to have the absolute perfect situation (and a truly obsessive love of your yard) for it to be worthwhile.

So, I'm mainly thinking of getting an electric mower instead. It's a little expensive, but I'd love the lack of maintenance issues and the cordlessness of their top pick. Anyone here have any negative experiences with electric mowers?

Clearly the solution is a robot lawn mower

I wish my lawn was flat enough (and not river adjacent) to be able to use one

stevewm
May 10, 2005


Not sure which thread to post this in, but anyways..

I have a drainage problem I am trying to figure out the best solution for..

My entire front yard is a slight downwards slope towards the house and the garage. If it rains really hard, water tends to pool all the way across the front of the garage. Usually making its way into the garage a couple inches.



Edit: non-cropped pic


I've seen drainage channels for concrete driveways... but that doesn't seem like that would work too well in a gravel driveway due to natural movement. Or maybe I am wrong on that.

The yard off to the right of that picture slopes down away from the driveway and garage, so that would be the obvious place to drain the water to. My first thought was a piece of PVC pipe with some small holes drilled in it buried in front of the length of the garage. But I am not sure how well, or how long that would work.

Any ideas?

stevewm fucked around with this message at 03:47 on Apr 20, 2021

FogHelmut
Dec 18, 2003

Your authority is not recognized in Fort Kickass.


Wallet posted:


Depending on the brand you can likely take off at least the top of the casing which might let you see what's wrong with it.

Good idea. The tube that pops up has a fat spot about halfway up where it gets stuck. Gonna replace it.

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wooger
Apr 16, 2005

YOU RESENT?

stevewm posted:

Not sure which thread to post this in, but anyways..

I have a drainage problem I am trying to figure out the best solution for..

My entire front yard is a slight downwards slope towards the house and the garage. If it rains really hard, water tends to pool all the way across the front of the garage. Usually making its way into the garage a couple inches.



Edit: non-cropped pic


I've seen drainage channels for concrete driveways... but that doesn't seem like that would work too well in a gravel driveway due to natural movement. Or maybe I am wrong on that.

The yard off to the right of that picture slopes down away from the driveway and garage, so that would be the obvious place to drain the water to. My first thought was a piece of PVC pipe with some small holes drilled in it buried in front of the length of the garage. But I am not sure how well, or how long that would work.

Any ideas?

What is under the gravel?
If it was the right thing it should already have great drainage making this impossible.

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