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Lucas Archer
Dec 1, 2007
Falling...

Patrat posted:

The thing is? US fighter pilots actually call each other poo poo like 'Hawk', I met 'General Hawk' in London last year: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Herbert_J._Carlisle

That was apparently his callsign but he now, after retiring, uses it as his name.

Yeah, I know about callsigns. My dad was a pilot in Vietnam, callsign Troll.

IIRC, in the book, Hawk was the guys actual name.

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Gnoman
Feb 11, 2014

"What we therefore hath joined together, let Gnoman put asunder..."


Yes. The protagonist of the Wingman series was Hawk Hunter, who was not only a supremely skilled fighter pilot, but also an engineering genius, an expert mechanic, amd had a built-in psychic radar.

Lucas Archer
Dec 1, 2007
Falling...

I completely forgot about his magic internal radar that was more accurate than his navigation equipment.

90s Cringe Rock
Nov 29, 2006



How big was his dick?

Wibla
Feb 16, 2011


Lucas Archer posted:

Yeah, I know about callsigns. My dad was a pilot in Vietnam, callsign Troll.

You can't leave us hanging like that! What's the story behind that callsign?

Lucas Archer
Dec 1, 2007
Falling...

Wibla posted:

You can't leave us hanging like that! What's the story behind that callsign?

Honestly? He never told me or my brother, as far as I know. According to him, callsigns were usually not something cool or interesting, they were insults that stuck and became what they were called.

C.M. Kruger
Oct 28, 2013


http://www.f-16.net/callsigns.html

quote:

OPEC (added: 19 Sep 2017)
Dutch F-16 pilot's Name was Oliemans. Translated his name is 'Oil man' so a good call sign was quickly found.

Alphabet (added: 31 Mar 2016)
Had this new guy in the squadron by the name of Varsonofy Krestovozdvizhensky. After the first day, everybody just called him Alphabet.

Squidbait (added: 14 Oct 2017)
Captain Michael Ross, RF-4C driver was shot down by USN F-14 Tomcat during exercise over the med.

Captain (added: 30 Apr 2015)
F-16 Driver in Japan - real name was James Kirk

quote:

Bambi
This pilot, who is now flying F-15s at Tyndall, hit a pregnant deer with his nosegear while taking off in a T-38 at Columbus. Needless to say, there were guts all over the runway and they had to close it for half an hour to clean-up.

Bambi Killer
'Some years ago a guy was in Gagetown learning to fly the Kiowa. One of the events was learning to fire the gun pod; the mission was to pop up from behind a hill and shoot at a target a mile away. It takes a few seconds for the lead to travel downrange, and as one pilot was watching to see if he'd hit the target, a deer made the fatal mistake of leaping from behind cover at the wrong moment. For the rest of this fellow's career in the Canadian Forces, he was tagged 'Bambi Killer'.'

Banana
Last name Hammock.

Batman
One day I thought it would be a good idea to share a picture of a SPEC Ops guy in HALO gear getting ready for a jump...he looked like Batman. So I sent the e-mail out to the rest of the shop under the title "I am BATMAN!!!" and made the mistake of not attatching said picture. From that day on I was officially known as Batman.

quote:

Salako
Hellenic air force pilot received this callsign while training training with the USAF, after the god of rain of the Zuni indians, due to his excellent evaluation results in heavy rain.

Sensei
Albeit a cool sounding callsign the story behind it makes it qualify. I made it through college on a scholarship for the martial arts team. I taught martial arts in various styles both in the service and in the civilian world as well. I had been given a couple of variations of "Miyagi" to "KK" (short for "karate kid") and even WOWO ("wax on, wax off") but finally ended up with "Sensei". There I was... fellow meatbags in a bar drinking too much and hitting on too ugly women. Except for me. I had been voted the designated driver. Mainly because I had a car. It's 0300 and two of the guys decide it's a good idea to have a boxing match and they want me to referee. I was tired and wanted to go home so I thought "How long can these two asshats last drunk as they are?" They start and they are fighting as well as drunk, untrained fighters can fight. One throws a haymaker no where near his opponent and clocks me right in the eye. Me, the sober, martial arts "expert" is the only one who gets hit. Next day at the squadron I get grounded by the flight surgeon because I can't see out of my swollen eye. I'm getting an rear end chewing by the wing king himself and at some point he screams loud enough for all to hear, "Ain't you some kind of poo poo hot Sensei or something? How the f*** you end up with a black eye?" The name stuck after that. personally, I preferred WOWO.


Slush
'Right after Top Gun came out there was a 'new guy' who wanted (pleaded) to be called Ice. The rest of the squadron decided he wasn't cool enough to be called Ice... so they named him 'Slush'.'

quote:

Tank
A much-feared Ops Group commander who would bully and steamroll over anyone who showed weakness, but that's not where the callsign came from... As a youngster, he went to drop a bomb on a practice range in or near England, but pickled his centerline tank instead. Oops!

Thump
The sound a body makes when it hits the ground...hard. I fell off a second story balcony at the Tyndal Q's during our post WSEP Ops/Mx party.

Torch
LTC Don Campbell at Luke AFB, 1988. Taking off for Hawaii with three bags of gas, lights the blower, engine blows up, airplane catches on fire. He aborts takeoff, ground egresses, and runs to the edge of the runway, pulls out his pack of cigarettes, and very rapidly puffs through the entire pack as he watches his airplane burn up. Hence "Torch".
Torch
Leading a 4 ship on a low level to the bombing range in Spain, Hit a 29 lb vulture at 510 kts groundspeed. Aircraft blew up and the stab went full deflection down (which gave me a 12 G pitchup) #2 called for me to eject, call was blocked by #4 calling a "knock it off". When someone asked why he made that call he stated "I thought someone lit a blowtorch in front of my canopy". Blowtorch was shortened to "Torch" at a crud game at the Nellis O'Club during Green Flag.
Torch
Navy pilot in training, came in too fast - when he applied the breaks the main wheels and brakes burst in to flames

Dan Hampton, "Viper Pilot" posted:

Now, this particular ritual ends in a ceremony simply known as the “Naming.”

This is where fighter pilots get awarded those cool-sounding nicknames, or call signs, you hear about in the movies. I mean, who wouldn’t want to be “Maverick” or “Iceman” or “Thor.” Right?

Right.

The reality is a bit different. There are some manly, warlike call signs, of course. I’ve known Slash, Magic, Crusher, Bruiser, and Storm’n. Even Ghost, Spook, and Zing aren’t too bad. Usually call signs are given for something noteworthy, and not necessarily good, that a pilot has done. Or maybe the guy is just an rear end in a top hat —“JRay,” “Barney,” and “Moses” are prime examples of that.

“Slider” is usually given for landing gear-up; “Scratch,” you guessed it, for scratching the belly of the aircraft on a low level or dinging the speed brakes on the runway; “Boomer” for inadvertently breaking the sound barrier and every window within a five-mile radius. The possibilities are endless.

“Toto”—for accidentally shutting the engine down (throttle on, throttle off—get it?). I even knew a “Bubbles,” who’d ejected over the Atlantic Ocean. Anything, including personal traits or physical appearance, is fair game. So we have “Opies” and “Wookies” and even a “DDong” (short for “Donkey Dong”). I’m sure his mother would be proud.

There are a few rules with this. First, and most important, if you’ve carried a call sign into combat, then you can never be renamed—it’s yours for life. Second, if you’ve managed to keep the same call sign while flying in three different theaters (like Europe, the Far East, etc.) then it’s yours to keep. Third, and most common, if you really hate a call sign then it’s probably also yours for life.

I was named Two Dogs in loose reference to an old joke about how American Indians name their children. (“Why do you ask, Two Dogs loving in the Night?”) You see, I suntan to a deep reddish brown and my nose is beaked, so it kind of made sense in the Tinto haze on that sultry Spanish night in the gutter. Hey, there are definitely worse things to be called. Like Homer, Kraken, or Moto (“Master of the Obvious”). Anyway, it stuck. Honestly, at that stage of the night, I wouldn’t have cared if they’d named me Cindy, as long as it got me back to the Officer’s Quarters and my toilet any sooner.

Paddyo
Aug 3, 2007


A Templin Institute video on the Frontline series got me to check out the first book. Really enjoyed it and starting the second one. Lots of action, military jargon, dystopia, all of that. It's basically the movie "Aliens" presented as a series of novels, which frankly is exactly what I was looking for, and so far it's way better than any of the actual Aliens / AVP books that I've read. The protagonist doesn't seem to be completely OP and the prose doesn't make my eyes bleed. Great background noise for painting 40K minis.

Paddyo
Aug 3, 2007


Lol - I ended up pounding out all six of the Frontlines audiobooks in the last three weeks. They're really good! Total mil scifi porn, but with a "realistic" presentation and an interesting cast of characters. Once I ran out of those books I started the Palladium Wars series by the same author, which is basically post WW1 / Versailles Europe in SPAAAACE. Super entertaining though. Both book series remind me a lot of the Expanse, where there isn't really any new ground being broken, but the typical tropes and characters are handled really well and it's obvious that the author cares about the details and his world-building.

I guess the author (Marco Kloos) was also responsible for a couple of the cooler chapters in the Netflix series Love, Death, and Robots. Lucky Thirteen was even adapted from a Frontlines short story.

FuturePastNow
May 19, 2014




I thought the thread might like to know:

https://twitter.com/HNTurtledove/status/1345216419365941248

jng2058
Jul 17, 2010

We have the tools, we have the talent!




Well, poo poo.

mllaneza
Apr 28, 2007


Veteran, Bermuda Triangle Expeditionary Force, 1993-1952





Well that sucks. Good to see the thread at least isn't dead.

e.

Anyway, the very first published (1960) Bolo story was

Night of the Trolls

This starts off with a very annoyed test pilot coming out of suspended animation. We find out very soon that there’s a project to launch an interstellar probe with a crew in hibernation. He’s testing the process and thought he was down for a three-day test. When he wakes up, there’s nobody around, no hot mug of soup, and the whole place looks deserted. As he explores the abandoned facility it gets creepier and creepier, and he’s seriously confused about how long it really has been since he went under.

His explorations culminate in a big fat rat running around a high-tech Air Force research project, and then literally stumbling over the desiccated corpse of a security guard. The corpse provides a loaded revolver, which is good, but kicks his estimate of “how the gently caress long ?” way up because “...there wasn’t a lot left of that soldier.” Along the way he scrounges a fancy, high-tech piece of survival wear, a temperature-controlled “weather suit”.

There’s nothing left on base, and his family should be at home in town, so up and out he climbs. The base is in rough shape, buckled concrete pavement (“Something had sent a ripple across the ground like a stone tossed into a pond”), faded paint, and apparently the research base doubled as a missile base because some of the silos are open. Whatever happened involved at least a limited nuclear exchange. Then we meet one of the eponymous Trolls.

“I heard a sound and stopped dead. There was a clank and rumble from beyond the discolored walls of the blockhouse a hundred yards away. Rusted metal howled; then something as big as a beached freighter moved into view.

Two dull red beams glowing near the top of the high silhouette swung, flashed crimson, and held on me. A siren went off - an ear-splitting whoop! whoop! WHOOP !

It was an unmanned Bolo Mark II Combat Unit on automated sentry duty - and its intruder-sensing circuits were tracking me.

The Bolo pivoted heavily; the whoop! whoop! sounded again; the robot watchdog was bellowing the alarm.

I felt sweat pop out on my forehead. Standing up to a Mark II Bolo without an electropass was the rough equivalent of being penned in with an ill-tempered dinosaur.”

Our so-far unnamed protagonist evades the Bolo by turning his “weather suit” to “full insulation” to retain heat and drop his infrared signature, combining that move with grabbing a scrap of paper and lighting it on fire to create a decoy. We don’t know his name yet, but his wife is Virginia or “Ginny” and their son is Tim.
“At twenty yards, looming up like a pagoda, the Bolo halted, sat rumbling and swiveling its rust-stained turret, looking for the radiating source its I-R had first picked up. The flare of the paper caught its electronic attention. The turret swung, then back. It was puzzled. It whooped again, then reached a decision.

Ports snapped open. A volley of antipersonnel slugs whoofed into the target; the scrap of paper disappeared in a gout of tossed dirt.”

Before Our Hero can actually get away, a convoy shows up from town to see what woke up the Troll Bolo. If the Bolo takes a dim view of unauthorized personnel on base, it’s dead set against a convoy of unidentified vehicles loaded with armed personnel.

Larry Parrish
Jul 9, 2012



he deserves it for me being dumb enough to read his books

Kchama
Jul 25, 2007

YAP YAP YAP


jng2058 posted:

Well, poo poo.

I hate his books, but I hope he recovers.

If only so he can finally loving finish them.

(Also, get well even if you don't finish them, Weber!)

Gnoman
Feb 11, 2014

"What we therefore hath joined together, let Gnoman put asunder..."


As I understand it, he isn't exactly a well man to begin with, so this is a very dangerous situation.

TheGreatEvilKing
Mar 28, 2016



I dislike his books but sincerely hope he recovers.

Mycroft Holmes
Mar 26, 2010

To the Moon! For Queen and Country!


anybody got some recommendations for post-apocalypse stuff that isn't right-wing? I'm tired of wannabe tom kratmans making GBS threads out dreck.

GD_American
Jul 21, 2004

427 TOTALLY LEGITIMATE, DEFENSIBLE NATIONAL TITLES AND COUNTING


I'm just glad Weber lived long enough to finish his sequel to Out of the Dark.

I'm serious. He made a sequel.

It drops January 12th.

Deptfordx
Dec 23, 2013



It's a collaborative 'BIGNAME & nobody' book though and you know how those things work.

So Weber wrote the outline and Chris Kennedy actually wrote the prose.

mllaneza
Apr 28, 2007


Veteran, Bermuda Triangle Expeditionary Force, 1993-1952





Worst case, they hire General Battuta to finish them.

No wait, that's good plan no matter what happens.

Polikarpov
Jun 1, 2013

STICK TO BUILDING TRACTORS, KHARKOVITE SCUM

mllaneza posted:

Worst case, they hire General Battuta to finish them.

No wait, that's good plan no matter what happens.

Goon Project- Buy the good General the IP rights to the Honorverse.

Epicurius
Apr 10, 2010


College Slice

Mycroft Holmes posted:

anybody got some recommendations for post-apocalypse stuff that isn't right-wing? I'm tired of wannabe tom kratmans making GBS threads out dreck.

The Stand
The Handmaid's Tale
World War Z
New York 2140

Deptfordx
Dec 23, 2013



It's an old book now, but I've always really enjoyed Wyndhams The Kraken Wakes.

quantumfoam
Dec 25, 2003



Sad news about David Weber.
Still doing the SFL Archives readthrough, David Weber started getting mentioned in 1992.

------------------------------
Date: 30 Mar 92 16:03:05 GMT
From: jdnicoll@watyew.uwaterloo.ca (James Davis Nicoll)
Reply-to: sf-lovers-written@Rutgers.Edu
Subject: Re: Reviews: short takes

msmith@beta.tricity.wsu.edu (Mark Smith) writes:
>>Title: Crusade
>>Author: David Weber
>>Author: Steve White
>>Publisher: Baen
>>Date: March 1992
>>Format: paperback, US$4.99
>>Pages: 426
>>ISBN 0-671-72111-9
>
>>The author of _Mutineer's_Moon_ utters yet another grand galumphing
>>space-opera. This is the kind of book for which describing the plot and
>>characters is silly; they're just excuses to frame lots of gaudy
>>space-battle scenes and hardware blowing up in all directions. If you
>>like that sort of thing (as I for one do), you'll enjoy this. If not,
>>avoid this book as you would the plague.
>
>Actually, you forgot to mention the enemies religious fanaticism for Holy
>Terra. And they aren't even human!! Actually, I like this kind of space
>opera much better than Star Wars. Hmm, maybe we can get a series from
>them? A whole trilogy, no, DEKOLOGY of super dreadnoughts blowing their
>drive cores!! OOOHH, 3 pages of watching an individual rivet being blown
>from its hull!!!
>
>Really though, It felt to be more of a commentary on fanaticism and
>terrorism and the harsh and brutal retribution that it deserves and needs.

Scrounge up a copy of 'Starfire' and 'Starfire Empires' by Task Force
Games. Both Crusade and Insurrection are, hmmm, based on might be a tad too
strong, very heavily influenced by 'Starfire'. This isn't too surprising,
since Weber and White had playtest credits in the newest edition. Don't
think 'sequel'; think 'scenario fodder'

I think Weber and White tweaked some of the game mechanics which are
there for reasons related to game design, but which aren't necessary in a
book and are not plausible (Missile move drat close to C in 1st edtion
Starfire, if memory serves)

Insurrection has the 'good guys' (Who have legitimate gripes about
gerrymandering) commit a genuine Atrocity fairly early on.

James Nicoll

------------------------------


Mycroft Holmes posted:

anybody got some recommendations for post-apocalypse stuff that isn't right-wing? I'm tired of wannabe tom kratmans making GBS threads out dreck.

Read the Wasteland 1 paragraphs. They are Michael A Stackpole's best writing work.

Gnoman
Feb 11, 2014

"What we therefore hath joined together, let Gnoman put asunder..."


That's a bit on an interesting excerpt. Weber wasn't just a starfire playtester by then - pretty sure he was already writing setting books.

FuturePastNow
May 19, 2014




The Starfire series definitely read like novelizations of wargame campaigns. Insurrection isn't very good but I was entertained by the other three Weber co-wrote (though I never got around to the later ones Steve White wrote without Weber). There are a lot of setpieces and a lot of characters he changes the names of and re-uses in his later books.

Deptfordx
Dec 23, 2013



The later Steve White ones are awful, don't touch them.

Bremen
Jul 20, 2006

Our God..... is an awesome God

GD_American posted:

I'm just glad Weber lived long enough to finish his sequel to Out of the Dark.

I'm serious. He made a sequel.

It drops January 12th.

I don't know, you're assuming the sequel doesn't end on a cliffhanger when Santa Claus leads an alien fleet in a sneak attack on Earth. The saga may not be over.

Seriously though, while I found David Weber's books to be a mixed bag I did enjoy some of them and they basically introduced me to Mil-SciFi. I do hope he recovers.

Disclaimer: If the sequel does in fact end with Santa Claus showing up, no, I didn't read an advance copy.

Bremen fucked around with this message at 06:11 on Jan 5, 2021

PupsOfWar
Dec 6, 2013



Mycroft Holmes posted:

anybody got some recommendations for post-apocalypse stuff that isn't right-wing? I'm tired of wannabe tom kratmans making GBS threads out dreck.

which post-apocalypse stuff have you bounced off of before

Libluini
May 18, 2012

Did I predict the future?


Grimey Drawer

FuturePastNow posted:

The Starfire series definitely read like novelizations of wargame campaigns. Insurrection isn't very good but I was entertained by the other three Weber co-wrote (though I never got around to the later ones Steve White wrote without Weber). There are a lot of setpieces and a lot of characters he changes the names of and re-uses in his later books.

Insurrection was so weird. First the atrocity seems to foreshadow the sad, but inevitable victory of the good guys, then the bad guys pull out a last-minute reinforcement with big deus ex machina ships to defeat the good guys. The ending was so dumb it hurt.

Beefeater1980
Sep 12, 2008

My God, it's full of Horatios!





Whoever recommended Marco Kloos, thank you! I’m into book 3 in the frontline series and it’s amazing: language is a bit spare but having a space grunt character who is thoughtful and not a fascist is a very nice change.

E: seriously it’s so nice to have a POV character in mil sci fi who isn’t a shithead.

Beefeater1980 fucked around with this message at 07:57 on Jan 12, 2021

Larry Parrish
Jul 9, 2012


his other series, palladium wars, is neat too. the protagonist's side lost the war, and he was part of some elite rear end in a top hat regiment, apparently responsible for war crimes on other fronts than where he served. any other book would have the bitter veteran being like 'yeah, so what?' but this dude is legitimately ashamed and trying to hide it lol. totally incompatible with the generic psychotic american sci fi writer mindset.

Paddyo
Aug 3, 2007


I listened to a Templin Institute interview of Marco Kloos after getting hooked on Frontlines, and he's a super interesting guy. He's German, and served in the West German Army prior to the collapse of the Belin Wall. I tend to think that's why he has a different perspective on the genre and why it's not quite so jingoistic and way more cynical. Really is a breath of fresh air.

I'm all out of Kloos books to read now (sad), so moved on to Scalzi's Interdependency series. All of the quippiness and copy-paste characters gets really old. It's like he's trying to write a Joss Whedon script or something, and I don't remember Old Man's War being that crappy. Really makes me miss Frontlines and Palladium Wars.

Larry Parrish
Jul 9, 2012


i really liked red shirts, because the setting fit john scalzi's writing a lot better. i don't remember old man's war being that way, but its been like 7 years since i read it

quantumfoam
Dec 25, 2003



It finally happened.
The first Honor Harrington book finally got discussed in the SFL Archives readthrough project I've been blogging about off-site.
Since this thread is roughly 79% Honorverse chat by post-count, let me inflict some 1993 views of Honor Harrington, David Weber's other mil-scifi books, and some other non-Weber space navy opera fiction onto this thread.



------------------------------
Date: 6 Mar 93 03:58:43 GMT
From: dani@netcom.com (Dani Zweig)
Reply-to: sf-lovers-written@Rutgers.Edu
Subject: David Weber: Honor Harrington on Basilisk Station

"Honor Harrington on Basilisk Station" is the first of what's obviously
meant to be as many "Honor Harrington" novels as Baen can sell. (The
second, "Honor of the Queen", will be out in two months, and presumably
sequels will depend on sales.) This didn't deter me from trying it: It
looked as though it might be intereting space opera and these opening
novels of would-be series generally have to be pretty good.

And so it was. Pure space opera: Honor Harrington is a brilliant captain
in the Manticoran space navy, the kind who's in the right place at the
right time, and whose ship can outfight ten times her number because she's
a tactical genius and her heart is pure, who's made the mistake of
seriously embarrassing a petty officer. Unfortunately, when an admiral
decides to be petty...

So Harrington's ship is assigned to the nether end of beyond, which is
*how* she happens to be in the right place at the right time. Pure space
opera, but fun. I'll keep reading it as long as it doesn't disappoint.

Dani Zweig
dani@netcom.com
------------------------------
------------------------------
Date: 1 May 93 16:05:40 GMT
From: d93mykle@hfk.mil.no (BKM)
Reply-to: sf-lovers-written@Rutgers.Edu
Subject: David Weber

I have just finished the book "Honor HArrington on basilisk station" by
David Weber, and IMHO it is one of the best books I have read this year.

On the cover I found a list of other books by Weber, has anyone read them?,
are they any good?

Path of the Fury
Mutineer's Moon
Insurrection (with Steve White)
Crusade (with Steve White)

I would appreciate it if someone would share his opinion of these books
with me.

Thanks for your time.

Bjorn Kj Myklebust
d93mykle@hfk.mil.no
------------------------------
------------------------------
Date: 1 May 93 18:32:04 GMT
From: dswartz@osf.org (Dan Swartzendruber)
Reply-to: sf-lovers-written@Rutgers.Edu
Subject: Re: David Weber

d93mykle@hfk.mil.no (BKM) writes:
>I have just finished the book "Honor HArrington on basilisk station" by
>David Weber, and IMHO it is one of the best books I have read this year.

>On the cover I found a list of other books by Weber, has anyone read
>them?, are they any good?
>
>Path of the Fury

Similar type of book to Honor Harrington. I like them both.

>Mutineer's Moon

If you can get by the initial suspension of disbelief required at the
beginning, it's a good book too. And it cries out for a sequel.

>Insurrection (with Steve White)
>Crusade (with Steve White)

Similar to Honor Harrington. Good books. Insurrection is a sort-of sequel
to Crusade (only in the sense of being later chronologically in the same
universe).

>I would appreciate it if someone would share his opinion of these books
>with me.

Basically, Weber's books all seem to be a combination of space-opera and
military SF. I liked them all. If you like the one, you'll probably like
the others.

Dan S.
------------------------------
------------------------------
Date: 2 May 93 19:16:38 GMT
From: cpf@alchemy.tn.cornell.edu (Courtenay Footman)
Reply-to: sf-lovers-written@Rutgers.Edu
Subject: Re: David Weber

d93mykle@hfk.mil.no (BKM) writes:
>On the cover I found a list of other books by Weber, has anyone read
>them?, are they any good?
>
>Path of the Fury

This book wins my nomination for last year's "Worst blurb on a good book"
award. It describes a fairly typical revenge story in a fairly typical
"space empire" setting, with one highly atypical addition. The heroine is
aided (and inhabited by) a literal Greek Fury, Tisaphone, who had
apparently been in "hibernation" for the last few millenia. Naturally, the
villains, a group of especially nasty "space pirates", do not stand a
chance - the real question is whether the heroine will survive her ally.
The book is not perfect: it wastes three chapters describing the villain's
atrocities - three paragraphs would have been better. However, the rest of
the book is very good indeed.

>Mutineer's Moon

His first book, and good enough that it made me look at _Path of the Fury_
despite the awful blurb, but nothing special. For a first book it was
good, but _Fury_ and _On Basilisk Station_ were much better.

>Insurrection (with Steve White)
>Crusade (with Steve White)

Unread.

Courtenay Footman
cpf@alchemy.ithaca.ny.us
------------------------------
------------------------------
Date: 12 May 93 07:40:20 GMT
From: dani@netcom.com (Dani Zweig)
Reply-to: sf-lovers-written@Rutgers.Edu
Subject: David Weber: "The Honor of the Queen"

"The Honor of the Queen" is David Weber's second novel about Honor
Harrington, a space captain who defeats incredible odds because her heart
is pure, her tactical sense is unparalleled, and her ship has particularly
good electronic counter-measures. Yeah, it's space opera, but it doesn't
try to be more, and Weber is good at what he does. The point of reading
the book isn't to find out whether the right will triumph; it's to go along
for the ride as it does. A nice, if slightly mindless, change of pace from
developing your palate.

Dani Zweig
dani@netcom.com
------------------------------
------------------------------
Date: 13 May 93 02:58:38 GMT
From: moudgill@cs.cornell.edu ( Mayan Moudgill)
Reply-to: sf-lovers-written@Rutgers.Edu
Subject: Re: David Weber: "The Honor of the Queen"

I enjoyed the first book, and probably will enjoy the second, too. _BUT_
I'm really getting upset - much of the cultural flavor of the story is a
rip-off of Alexander Kent and C.S.Foster. For crying out loud, the whole
story reeked out loud of ``Royal Navy!''. It's just the Battler
Briton/Commando/Boy's Stories pulp and comics of the 30-50s period about
the Royal Navy, updated somewhat, and written well.

But like I said, I enjoyed it.


Mayan
------------------------------
------------------------------
Date: 17 May 93 18:16:56 GMT
From: rcrowley@donne.zso.dec.com (r crowley)
Reply-to: sf-lovers-written@Rutgers.Edu
Subject: Re: David Weber: "The Honor of the Queen"

I only just got around to reading _On Basilisk Station_, the first of the
Honor Harrington novels, which, as has been stated, is fun, if mindless.

I suffered a slight case of analogical whiplash, however, when the steely
eyes necessary to an angered hero intersected with the dark, brown, exotic,
almond shaped eyes of Honor, resulting in the classic, if inconceivable
(literally) : "like dark brown steel".

Out of context, this might cause me to reminisce about late 70s sedans. In
context, I giggled.

A very fun book, however.

Rebecca Crowley
rcrowley@zso.dec.com
------------------------------
------------------------------
Date: 23 Jun 93 05:46:08 GMT
From: cpf@alchemy.tn.cornell.edu (Courtenay Footman)
Reply-to: sf-lovers-written@Rutgers.Edu
Subject: Re: The Helmsman

One of my objections to the Helmsman series is that the space battles are
totally unbelievable. He has deep space battles taking place at ranges
that are more appropriate to Napoleonic sea stories.

(Incidentally, this is one reason why I like Weber's Honor Harrington
stories: the battles are believable. At one point, someone decides to hold
fire until reaching a suicidally close range. How close is suicidally
close? Twenty thousand kilometers!)

Courtenay Footman
cpf@alchemy.ithaca.ny.us
-----------------------------
-----------------------------
Date: 18 Jun 93 13:29:33 GMT
From: ted@usasoc.soc.mil (Mr. Ted Nolan)
Reply-to: sf-lovers-written@Rutgers.Edu
Subject: Re: The Helmsman

buliavac@isvax.lmsc.lockheed.com writes:
>Has anyone besides me ever read Bill Baldwin's ongoing series about The
>Helmsman? I enjoy these books, but additional novels seem to disappear
>from shelves quickly, never to be seen again. Isn't anyone else reading
>them?

If they disappear quickly from the shelves, maybe someone _is__ reading
them..

I have been reading and enjoying this series for a couple of years now. I
like the combination of Doc Smith and C.S. Forrestor and the books are fun
reads. It's exactly the kind of space opera you'd figure no one could
write anymore. However, I felt that the most recent one (can't remember
the title right now) was a little weak. In the previous books, the
conflict with the DarkStar League had been like Hornblower vs Napoleon, in
this one, they go for a WWII analogy, and some of the parallels are just
too pat. (In particular the Prince's rephrasing of Churchill's "Never have
so many owed so much to so few").

I plan to keep following the series, but IMHO, David Weber is doing the
best Hornblower in space right now with his Honor Harrington books.

You might also seek out A. Bertram Chandler's tales of John Grimes.

Ted Nolan
ted@erg.sri.com
------------------------------

GD_American
Jul 21, 2004

427 TOTALLY LEGITIMATE, DEFENSIBLE NATIONAL TITLES AND COUNTING


I read 2-3 of the earlier Honor books. Where'd he end up going in the end with everything? Carbon copy tactical genius kids, or is 930 year old Honor Harrington still saving the multiverse?

jng2058
Jul 17, 2010

We have the tools, we have the talent!



GD_American posted:

I read 2-3 of the earlier Honor books. Where'd he end up going in the end with everything? Carbon copy tactical genius kids, or is 930 year old Honor Harrington still saving the multiverse?

Heh. Funny story, that. It was supposed to be the former with Honor retiring and then her twin kids being the ones to save the universe from the next threat. But then Weber and Eric Flint got together for a side series of novels in the Honorverse that were more espionage based than warship based, and since Flint needed an in-universe enemy to fight who were sneaky and hidden, so Weber rather than create a new idea just brought the enemies that Honor's children were supposed to fight in 20 years and put them in the "present", so that in the end older Honor ends up destroying them too. Theoretically there's supposed to be some kind of future series with Honor as the wise old deskbound admiral giving out missions and advice while new characters do the fieldwork, but I've seen no announcements of new stuff, and with Weber's recent health problems, it may never happen at all. So as it stands right now, Honor does in fact solve all the galaxy's problems, apparently forever.

FuturePastNow
May 19, 2014




GD_American posted:

I read 2-3 of the earlier Honor books. Where'd he end up going in the end with everything? Carbon copy tactical genius kids, or is 930 year old Honor Harrington still saving the multiverse?

Libluini
May 18, 2012

Did I predict the future?


Grimey Drawer

A little correction: Honor has solved all the galaxy's problems. There's now nothing left for her to do. Which is, imho, the main reason there'll be no more Honor-books.

Weber's health can't possibly help, though.

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quantumfoam
Dec 25, 2003



Kloos's Frontline series is ok, but the main character is promoted pretty fast/is a special snowflake and not really hosed around with by the military in the first book. No, the old-rear end Bill the Galactic Hero book written back in 1965 is still the most realistic depiction of enlisted life in mil-fiction that I've stumbled across.

Drill instructors
===
“I hear Eager Beager turned out to be a Chinger spy,” Deathwish said, closing the box of candy and
sliding it under the pillow. “I should have figured that one out myself. I knew there was something very
wrong with him, doing his buddies’ boots and that crap, but I thought he was just nuts. Should have
known better …”
“Deathwish,” Bill said hoarsely, “it can’t be, I know—but you are acting like a human being!”
Deathwish chuckled, not his ripsaw-slicing human-bone chuckle, but an almost normal one.
Bill stammered. “But you are a sadist, a pervert, a beast, a creature, a thing, a murderer …”
“Why, thanks, Bill. That’s very nice to hear. I try to do my job to the best of my abilities, but I’m
human enough to enjoy a word of praise now and then. Being a murderer is hard to project, but I’m glad
it got across, even to a recruit as stupid as you were.”
“B-but … aren’t you really a …”
“Easy now!” Deathwish snapped, and there was enough of the old venom and vileness to lower Bill’s
body temperature six degrees. Then Deathwish smiled again. “Can’t blame you, son, for carrying on
this way, you being kind of stupid and from a rube planet and having your education retarded by the
troopers and all that. But wake up, boy! Military education is far too important a thing to be wasted by
allowing amateurs to get involved. If you read some of the things in our college textbooks it would
make your blood run cold, yes indeed. Do you realize that in prehistoric times the drill sergeants, or
whatever it was they called them, were real sadists! The armed forces would let these people with no
real knowledge absolutely destroy recruits. Let them learn to hate the service before they learned to fear
it, which plays hell with discipline. And talk about wasteful! They were always marching someone to
death by accident or drowning a squad or nonsense like that. The waste alone would make you cry.”
“Could I ask what you majored in in college?” Bill asked in a very tiny and humble voice.
“Military Discipline, Spirit-breaking, and Method Acting. A rough course, four years, but I graduated
sigma cum, which is not bad for a boy from a working-class family. I’ve made a career of the service,
and that’s why I can’t understand why the ungrateful bastards went and shipped me out on this crummy
can!” He lifted his gold-rimmed glasses to flick away a developing tear.
“You expect gratitude from the service?” Bill asked humbly.
“No, of course not, how foolish of me. Thanks for jerking me back into line, Bill, you’ll make a good
trooper. All I expect is criminal indifference which I can take advantage of by working through the Old
Boys Network, bribery, cutting false orders, black-marketing, and the other usual things. It’s just that I
had been doing a good job on you slobs in Camp Leon Trotsky, and the least I expected was to be left
alone to keep doing it, which was pretty drat stupid of me. I had better get cracking on my transfer
now.” He slid to his feet and stowed the candy and gold-rimmed glasses away in a locked footlocker.



Military Chaplains
===
Bill stepped through and snapped to attention when he saw the officer behind the single desk that
almost filled the tiny room. The officer, a fourth lieutenant, though still young was balding rapidly.
There were black circles under his eyes, and he needed a shave. His tie was knotted crookedly and
badly crumpled. He continued to scratch among the stacks of paper that littered the desk, picking them
up, changing piles with them, scrawling notes on some and throwing others into an overflowing
wastebasket. When he moved one of the stacks Bill saw a sign on the desk that read LAUNDRY
OFFICER.
“Excuse me, sir,” he said, “but I am in the wrong office. I was looking for the chaplain.”
“This is the chaplain’s office but he’s not on duty until 1300 hours, which is, as someone even as
stupid-looking as you can tell, is in fifteen minutes more.”
“Thank you, sir, I’ll come back …” Bill slid toward the door.
“You’ll stay and work.” The officer raised bloodshot eyeballs and cackled evilly. “I got you. You can
sort the hanky reports. I’ve lost six hundred jockstraps, and they may be in there. You think it’s easy to
be a laundry officer?” He sniveled with self-pity and pushed a tottering stack of papers over to Bill, who
began to sort through therm. Long before he was finished the buzzer sounded that ended the watch.
“I knew it!” the officer sobbed hopelessly, “this job will never end; instead it gets worse and worse.
And you think you got problems!” He reached out an unsteady finger and flipped the sign on his desk
over. It read CHAPLAIN on the other side. Then he grabbed the end of his necktie and pulled it back
hard over his right shoulder. The necktie was fastened to his collar and the collar was set into ball
bearings that rolled smoothly in a track fixed to his shirt. There was a slight whirring sound as the collar
rotated; then the necktie was hanging out of sight down his back and his collar was now on backward,
showing white and smooth and cool to the front.
The chaplain steepled his fingers before him, lowered his eyes, and smiled sweetly. “How may I help
you, my son?”
“I thought you were the laundry officer,” Bill said, taken aback.
“I am, my son, but that is just one of the burdens that must fall upon my shoulders. There is little call
for a chaplain in these troubled times, but much call for a laundry officer. I do my best to serve.” He
bent his head humbly.
“But—which are you? A chaplain who is a part-time laundry officer, or a laundry officer who is a
part-time chaplain ?”
“That is a mystery, my son. There are some things that it is best not to know. But I see you are
troubled. May I ask if you are of the faith?”
<Bil talks with the chaplain>
<sharing his issues>
<and concerns about >
<one weirdo guy>
<named Eager Beager>
This ritual was quickly finished, and Bill helped stow the things back in the box and watched it
vanish back into the desk. He said good-by and turned to leave.
“Just one moment, my son,” the chaplain said with his warmest smile, reaching back over his
shoulder at the same time to grab the end of his necktie. He pulled, and his collar whirred about, and as
it did the blissful expression was wiped from his face to be replaced by a surly snarl. “Just where do you
think you’re going, bowb! Put your rear end back in that chair.”
“B-but,” Bill stammered, “you said I was dismissed.”
“That’s what the chaplain said, and as laundry officer I have no truck with him. Now—fast—what’s
the name of this Chinger spy you are hiding?”
“I told you about that under oath—”
“You told the chaplain about it, and he keeps his word and he didn’t tell me, but I just happened to
hear.” He pressed a red button on the control panel. “The MPs are on the way. You talk before they get
here, bowb, or I’ll have you keelhauled without a space suit and deprived of canteen privileges for a
year. The name?”
===

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