Register a SA Forums Account here!
JOINING THE SA FORUMS WILL REMOVE THIS BIG AD, THE ANNOYING UNDERLINED ADS, AND STUPID INTERSTITIAL ADS!!!

You can: log in, read the tech support FAQ, or request your lost password. This dumb message (and those ads) will appear on every screen until you register! Get rid of this crap by registering your own SA Forums Account and joining roughly 150,000 Goons, for the one-time price of $9.95! We charge money because it costs us money per month for bills, and since we don't believe in showing ads to our users, we try to make the money back through forum registrations.
 
  • Post
  • Reply
Seluin
Jan 4, 2004



As a person with way too many loose stones that I need to turn into jewelry... Iím happy to see this thread back

Adbot
ADBOT LOVES YOU

Seluin
Jan 4, 2004



Garnets can range quite a bit in terms of brightness/sparkle. The link Xun posted has some good examples.

If you donít mind a more pastel shade, you could also maybe find some lighter garnets that are also worth less...just from the other end of the spectrum If you want deep saturated color + brightness and sparkle at most lightings, youíll likely need to pay more for it.

To get some color into the thread...hereís a couple garnets I have (2 rhodolites and a tsavorite). Not necessarily showstopping gems, but with color and fire that I liked & matched the budget I had for them.

Brighter direct light.


Slightly indirect.


Lower light.

Seluin
Jan 4, 2004



Scarodactyl posted:

Garnets are a bit paradoxical on this. In the classic red/pink color range really light tones are fairly rare, so you don't get the same kind of super cheap pale material that you would with beryl or quartz or what have you. Light toned pink and peach garnets in particular are a really hot commodity right now (see how 'Mahenge' garnets have been selling).

Ahh, that's a good point! I had been reading up on green tsavorites, and saw that light/dark generally had less value than the mid tones.

Seluin
Jan 4, 2004



Itís my first time at Tucson! Omg, I thought it would be just a couple of locations. Not 30+ hotels scattered across the area :O

The FOMO is strong.

Seluin
Jan 4, 2004



I was looking for gems (particularly weird rare poo poo) and facet rough.

I ended up spending most of my time doing Pueblo, 22nd street, JGX, and AGTA.

Was cool seeing some random dino bones too

Seluin
Jan 4, 2004



Tucson acquisitions!



Cobalt spinel chips, rhodochrosite cab, russian demantoid, hauyne, ethiopian emerald, and some grandiderite.

Seluin
Jan 4, 2004



Fantastic work

Seluin
Jan 4, 2004



Practicing my microphotography!

Opal.


Winza sapphire.


Pezzottaite.


Spinel.


Note, any streakiness is mostly my greasy fingers, not sloppy polish.

Dumb question. But how do folks clean their gems before photography? My methods still have them pretty gross.

Seluin
Jan 4, 2004



Scarodactyl posted:

Nics pics! (To be a bit pedantic they are technically photomicrographs--microphotographs are photos made tiny. Apparently they got there first, namingwise).
Ha! I appreciate the pedantics

Xun posted:

woah those are really awesome photos! My hands shake so much its a struggle to even get one nice photo
As Scarodactyl noted, the camera is mounted on the microscope so less shake!

Xun posted:

Usually right before I take photos I drop the gem into acetone for awhile, then I only move them around with a gem grabby thing or tweezers afterwards. It usually doesn't need wiping but sometimes I transfer them to a glasses cleaning cloth or just a napkin if I'm lazy and wipe them off on there making sure I don't touch the gem with my fingers at all.

Scarodactyl posted:

For prep alochol with fresh qtips works pretty well though it's kind of slow and a pain. Maybe an ultrasonic cleaner for something stubborn. One issue is some gems are triboelectric, so when you rub them they develop static electricity which attracts more dust.

Cheers for the word! And iirc, alcohol & acetone shouldn't cause a problem with any gems unless they've been oiled/dyed, yeah?

Today was spent trying to photograph a padparadscha to be accurate to its color. A task, which I have decided, is virtually impossible.

Seluin
Jan 4, 2004



Ugh. I feel you.

I tried to take some microscope pictures of some emeralds, Paraiba tourm, mint garnets, tsavorites. All looked like absolute trash with none showing the real color.

Iíve decided photographing green/teal stones is also impossible.

Seluin
Jan 4, 2004



Some new photomicrographs! Slightly less lint.

Purple montana sapphire with some inclusions. Rounded rutile?


Laurenthomasite. Fairly newly discovered trichroic mineral.


Grossular garnet. Color is wrong in the photograph. Much more minty blue green, but the cutting is beautiful.


Chunk of cobalt spinel. Turned much more violet under my lights.


Padparadscha.

Seluin fucked around with this message at 23:41 on Oct 10, 2020

Seluin
Jan 4, 2004



Unsure. Apparently it was shown off a bit at the most recent Tucson. Iíve only seen a very small number of specimens and faceted gems for sale online.

Seluin
Jan 4, 2004



Scarodactyl posted:

I just got my very first opposed bar back from the cutter!


Light pinkish purple Nigerian amethyst. Couldn't be happier with this.

Dudeeee. Thatís a stunner. How big is it?

Seluin
Jan 4, 2004



Thatís a remarkable blue for being natural! Excited to see what it turns into!

In the interest of sharing... mine is tinier than the pixel amethyst, but I love it anyway.



Lil red beryl baby from Wah Wah. Oiled but no other clarity treatments. Building up my beryl family

Seluin
Jan 4, 2004



Thank you! Iíd been searching for a bit, but everything i could find was either tiny, ugly, or $$$$$.

I did briefly dip my toe into rough buying for it, but gosh. Included beryl rough buying was hard enough. Red beryl rough is master class difficulty level.

Adbot
ADBOT LOVES YOU

Seluin
Jan 4, 2004



Lovely picture!

And +1 to rutilated quartz being beautiful stuff.

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • Post
  • Reply