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zoux
Apr 28, 2006



Squalid posted:

The Bridge on the River Kwai seems like it would be right up your ally. Another set in the Pacific is King Rat, by James Clavell.

I read all the Clavell novels some years ago because I enjoyed Shogun so much (yes even Whirlwind and Noble House) and always wondered what East Asian scholars thought of those books. Paternalist imperialist nonsense or a fair look at the cultures and events of the era?

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Tias
May 25, 2008

Deyr fe,
deyja fraendr,
deyr sjalfr it sama,
ek veit einn,
at aldrei deyr:
domr um daudan hvern.


Piss-cutting whoreboats galore, what's not to like?


(I am not an east asian scholar )

zoux
Apr 28, 2006



https://twitter.com/AgeofNapoleon/s...838842794692608


Welllllll

goatsestretchgoals
Jun 4, 2011

in soviet russia, you shove robot

Tias posted:

Piss-cutting whoreboats galore, what's not to like?

[citation desperately needed]

Grimnarsson
Sep 4, 2018


KYOON GRIFFEY JR posted:

Latvia feels a lot more like Central Europe to me than Eastern Europe.

I've had that opinion about Estonia as well. The Baltic Germans must have left a mark as they ruled the area up until 1917 or so?

Milo and POTUS
Sep 3, 2017

I will not shut up about the Mighty Morphin Power Rangers. I talk about them all the time and work them into every conversation I have. I built a shrine in my room for the yellow one who died because sadly no one noticed because she died around 9/11. Wanna see it?


Does anyone know off the top of their head the water volume of the 1938 yellow river flood

Stairmaster
Jun 8, 2012



NO.

Nenonen
Oct 22, 2009



Fallen Rib

Milo and POTUS posted:

Does anyone know off the top of their head the water volume of the 1938 yellow river flood

Depending on where you stand, about 60 dB.

Promontory
Apr 6, 2011


Hi thread, long time lurker, first time caller.

Does anyone have recommendations for modern books about 18th century military history? Back in the day I read books from historians such as André Corvisier and Christopher Duffy, but I've been out of the loop.

GotLag
Jul 17, 2005

食べちゃダメだよ


Milo and POTUS posted:

Does anyone know off the top of their head the water volume of the 1938 yellow river flood

"all of it"

Pyle
Feb 18, 2007

Tenno Heika Banzai

Cyrano4747 posted:

Cross posting this from TFRs milsurp thread because it’s cool as gently caress and has a ton of history embedded in it.

Goddamn that is a neat loving mosin.

Thanks on asking about my Finnish Arisakas. No, wait, you didn't ask. I am posting anyways.





That's the infantry model and the carbine. The text says type 38, as made in Meiji year 38. Which is 1905.
Made in Japan. Sold to Britain. Used by rear guard units in WWI. Sold to Russia. Made its way Finland. Ended up being used by Finnish rear guard units in WW2. Kept in reserves for a long time.

GotLag
Jul 17, 2005

食べちゃダメだよ


Pyle posted:

Thanks on asking about my Finnish Arisakas. No, wait, you didn't ask. I am posting anyways.





That's the infantry model and the carbine. The text says type 38, as made in Meiji year 38. Which is 1905.
Made in Japan. Sold to Britain. Used by rear guard units in WWI. Sold to Russia. Made its way Finland. Ended up being used by Finnish rear guard units in WW2. Kept in reserves for a long time.

You need to use the link to the image, not to the image page

bewbies
Sep 23, 2003



Fun Shoe

Promontory posted:

Hi thread, long time lurker, first time caller.

Does anyone have recommendations for modern books about 18th century military history? Back in the day I read books from historians such as André Corvisier and Christopher Duffy, but I've been out of the loop.

I just read Rick Atkinson's new book on the Revolutionary War book and I thought it was one of the best history books I've read in quite a while. Unfortunately, 1) it only covers the first two years of the war and 2) the next two books in the trilogy haven't been published yet and won't be for a while.

Kemper Boyd
Aug 6, 2007

no kings, no gods, no masters but a comfy chair and no socks


Pyle posted:

Made in Japan. Sold to Britain. Used by rear guard units in WWI. Sold to Russia. Made its way Finland. Ended up being used by Finnish rear guard units in WW2. Kept in reserves for a long time.

Those apparently turned up at coastal forts a lot, since those were out of the way and no one expected the coastal artillery to have anything else to fight than botes.

Cyrano4747
Sep 25, 2006



Pyle posted:

Thanks on asking about my Finnish Arisakas. No, wait, you didn't ask. I am posting anyways.





That's the infantry model and the carbine. The text says type 38, as made in Meiji year 38. Which is 1905.
Made in Japan. Sold to Britain. Used by rear guard units in WWI. Sold to Russia. Made its way Finland. Ended up being used by Finnish rear guard units in WW2. Kept in reserves for a long time.

You should go post those for the old gun nerds in the milsurp thread.

KYOON GRIFFEY JR
Apr 12, 2010



Kemper Boyd posted:

Those apparently turned up at coastal forts a lot, since those were out of the way and no one expected the coastal artillery to have anything else to fight than botes.

Coastal forts are pretty much ideal for oddball stuff, including captured artillery pieces. You have a lot of places to store ammunition and the fort don't move, so it's not like you have to worry that much about resupply. A lot of the troops are specialists so they will stay posted in the same place for longer, and there's less temptation to strip the fort of its garrison than say, a town.

Panzeh
Nov 27, 2006



zoux posted:

I read all the Clavell novels some years ago because I enjoyed Shogun so much (yes even Whirlwind and Noble House) and always wondered what East Asian scholars thought of those books. Paternalist imperialist nonsense or a fair look at the cultures and events of the era?

Shogun is, uh, to put it politely, really bad on all the cultures it represents, including the Dutch and English. I liked it a lot when i was a teenager though. I tried to read Gai-jin fairly recently and had to put it down not far into it because it felt even worse.

Cessna
Feb 20, 2013

KHABAHBLOOOM

Promontory posted:

Does anyone have recommendations for modern books about 18th century military history?

With Zeal and With Bayonets Only: The British Army on Campaign in North America, 1775–1783 by Spring is quite good.

SeanBeansShako
Nov 20, 2009


Panzeh posted:

Shogun is, uh, to put it politely, really bad on all the cultures it represents, including the Dutch and English. I liked it a lot when i was a teenager though. I tried to read Gai-jin fairly recently and had to put it down not far into it because it felt even worse.

His stuff has not aged well, I'd suggest King Rat and maybe the TV version of Shogun on YouTube.

Cessna
Feb 20, 2013

KHABAHBLOOOM

SeanBeansShako posted:

His stuff has not aged well, I'd suggest King Rat

I seem to recall that one isn't exactly LGBT friendly. This can be expected as it was written in (googles) 1962, but it's worth remembering.

Milo and POTUS
Sep 3, 2017

I will not shut up about the Mighty Morphin Power Rangers. I talk about them all the time and work them into every conversation I have. I built a shrine in my room for the yellow one who died because sadly no one noticed because she died around 9/11. Wanna see it?



I'm still trying to figure out this response

zoux
Apr 28, 2006



Panzeh posted:

Shogun is, uh, to put it politely, really bad on all the cultures it represents, including the Dutch and English. I liked it a lot when i was a teenager though. I tried to read Gai-jin fairly recently and had to put it down not far into it because it felt even worse.

Ah too bad, I rather enjoyed them 15 years ago. They were the first books that got me into historical fiction

SeanBeansShako
Nov 20, 2009


Woah weird, I read them more or less from the library around the same time too.

Nebakenezzer
Sep 13, 2005

The Mote in God's Eye



Chamale posted:

Edit: As an Albertan, here's my understanding of the regions of Canada:



As someone who's lived on both sides of that line I found that division p. interesting

As far as I can tell, the only place this tracks completely accurately is Western Canada loves (american) football, Eastern Canada does not

e: oh and west of Winnipeg plowing the roads is a sign of moral decay

PS> In my high school's libriary I was chagrined to discover that in the encyclopedia Newfoundland's main economic activity was "nomadic herding"

Nebakenezzer fucked around with this message at 16:06 on May 20, 2020

Kemper Boyd
Aug 6, 2007

no kings, no gods, no masters but a comfy chair and no socks


KYOON GRIFFEY JR posted:

Coastal forts are pretty much ideal for oddball stuff, including captured artillery pieces. You have a lot of places to store ammunition and the fort don't move, so it's not like you have to worry that much about resupply. A lot of the troops are specialists so they will stay posted in the same place for longer, and there's less temptation to strip the fort of its garrison than say, a town.

A story about the Finnish coastal artillery I heard back in the day when a friend served on the fort of Utö, was that the other main fort, Örö, had a grand total of one combat casualty during the entirety of WW2. A detachment from the fort was sent to investigate a Soviet bomber that had crashlanded on the sea ice near the fort during the winter, and one of the crew members was found wandering around the bomber, probably wounded and concussed to poo poo during the crash. The Lt in charge of the patrol got so worked up by finding a prisoner that he tried drawing his pistol and promptly put a round in his own leg and bled out on the ice.

Trin Tragula
Apr 22, 2005



Young Officers: universally a Bad Thing

Nenonen
Oct 22, 2009



Fallen Rib

Trin Tragula posted:

Young Officers: universally a Bad Thing

Fortunately the quick thinking sergeant protected the fortress' morale by making all witnesses swear that they'd go by the Plan. It wasn't until 1944 when the war was over that the lieutenant, who had become surprisingly antisocial and would only talk through his sergeant, was revealed to be a Soviet airman.

Grimnarsson
Sep 4, 2018


Kemper Boyd posted:

Those apparently turned up at coastal forts a lot, since those were out of the way and no one expected the coastal artillery to have anything else to fight than botes.

I've read the that the Carcanos Finland procured from Italy, the ones with the fixed sights and uncommon caliber, ended up in coastal forts as well.

KYOON GRIFFEY JR
Apr 12, 2010



Grimnarsson posted:

I've read the that the Carcanos Finland procured from Italy, the ones with the fixed sights and uncommon caliber, ended up in coastal forts as well.

Mussolini used/attempted to use Finland as a dumping ground for all manner of poo poo that the Italians didn't want. What's funny is that the Germans restricted transit of arms from Italy to Finland due to the desire to keep on the USSR's good side.

crazypeltast52
May 5, 2010



Nebakenezzer posted:

As someone who's lived on both sides of that line I found that division p. interesting

As far as I can tell, the only place this tracks completely accurately is Western Canada loves (american) football, Eastern Canada does not

e: oh and west of Winnipeg plowing the roads is a sign of moral decay

PS> In my high school's libriary I was chagrined to discover that in the encyclopedia Newfoundland's main economic activity was "nomadic herding"

So what you’re saying is that the next time oil is above $100 a barrel, Calgary is going to poach an NFL team?

Squalid
Nov 4, 2008



Nenonen posted:

Fortunately the quick thinking sergeant protected the fortress' morale by making all witnesses swear that they'd go by the Plan. It wasn't until 1944 when the war was over that the lieutenant, who had become surprisingly antisocial and would only talk through his sergeant, was revealed to be a Soviet airman.

Finnish Kagemusha remake looking lit

Raenir Salazar
Nov 5, 2010

ASK ME ABOUT MY LOVE OF EUGENICS AND MARIO 3


College Slice

Panzeh posted:

Shogun is, uh, to put it politely, really bad on all the cultures it represents, including the Dutch and English. I liked it a lot when i was a teenager though. I tried to read Gai-jin fairly recently and had to put it down not far into it because it felt even worse.

So, in the book, it sounded like English people in the 1600s didn't bath, we know the Romans were big into bathing, how accurate was this? Or did big public baths like the Romans had went away and people are thinking the big public baths going away also means no one bathed, even in a river, ever?

Grimnarsson
Sep 4, 2018


KYOON GRIFFEY JR posted:

Mussolini used/attempted to use Finland as a dumping ground for all manner of poo poo that the Italians didn't want. What's funny is that the Germans restricted transit of arms from Italy to Finland due to the desire to keep on the USSR's good side.

Well I haven't heard it put in that way but I suppose there's no difference between that and Italy magnanimously giving Finland whatever it has available for the fight against communism, at least from Finland's perspective. IIRC those Carcano rifles were available even as they were fairly modern because Italy decided not to move to a new cartridge and whatever other complications there might have been in replacing a rifle. They weren't dumping antiquated stuff at the very least.

HEY GUNS
Oct 11, 2012

In the 17th century, the Holy Roman Empire was ravaged by the Thirty Years' War. In the middle of this chaos appeared a Japanese mercenary named Isaak. His fierce battle begins!


Raenir Salazar posted:

So, in the book, it sounded like English people in the 1600s didn't bath, we know the Romans were big into bathing, how accurate was this? Or did big public baths like the Romans had went away and people are thinking the big public baths going away also means no one bathed, even in a river, ever?
people bathed in the middle ages. it's specifically the 17th century that may have been the grossest age in europe.

KYOON GRIFFEY JR
Apr 12, 2010



Grimnarsson posted:

Well I haven't heard it put in that way but I suppose there's no difference between that and Italy magnanimously giving Finland whatever it has available for the fight against communism, at least from Finland's perspective. IIRC those Carcano rifles were available even as they were fairly modern because Italy decided not to move to a new cartridge and whatever other complications there might have been in replacing a rifle. They weren't dumping antiquated stuff at the very least.

Oh yeah it all depends on where you sit. The G.50s were fairly modern as well.

Nessus
Dec 22, 2003

I still can't believe they cast Spock as me. Spock! Can you imagine?

Of course, he was missing a few things.



HEY GUNS posted:

people bathed in the middle ages. it's specifically the 17th century that may have been the grossest age in europe.
How bad was it? What I've heard is that basically everyone who didn't have a literal Arrakis-scale water shortage would wash their face/hands fairly regularly and all cultures would at least occasionally hose off, even if you might go the cold months without much of a body scrub. People in the past were dirtier than us but it is arguably more that we are exceptionally clean.

Grimnarsson
Sep 4, 2018


HEY GUNS posted:

people bathed in the middle ages. it's specifically the 17th century that may have been the grossest age in europe.

Why was there such a stark difference between the middle ages and the early modern period? Superficially my mind goes to the middle ages still having bath houses dating back to the Romans and early modern having powdered wigs and perfumes to dispel miasma.

zoux
Apr 28, 2006





Also their dicks are too big!

Cyrano4747
Sep 25, 2006



Ye Chad Viking & ye virgin Saxon

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Fuligin
Oct 27, 2010


Promontory posted:

Hi thread, long time lurker, first time caller.

Does anyone have recommendations for modern books about 18th century military history? Back in the day I read books from historians such as André Corvisier and Christopher Duffy, but I've been out of the loop.

Crucible of War, by Fred Anderson. It's on the French-Indian War and it's quite good.

Anarchy, by William Dalrimple, is one of the best history books I've read in a while. Covers the East India Company and its expansion into a quasi-state during the fall of the Mughal Empire. Really recommended

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