Register a SA Forums Account here!
JOINING THE SA FORUMS WILL REMOVE THIS BIG AD, THE ANNOYING UNDERLINED ADS, AND STUPID INTERSTITIAL ADS!!!

You can: log in, read the tech support FAQ, or request your lost password. This dumb message (and those ads) will appear on every screen until you register! Get rid of this crap by registering your own SA Forums Account and joining roughly 150,000 Goons, for the one-time price of $9.95! We charge money because it costs us $3,400 per month for bandwidth bills alone, and since we don't believe in shoving popup ads to our registered users, we try to make the money back through forum registrations.
«342 »
  • Post
  • Reply
Cyrano4747
Sep 25, 2006



sullat posted:

On the other hand, I doubt parents are going to be spending $20 bucks to have their kids watch Tom Hanks drive a boat just to get 90 minutes of WFH peace which is what drove Trolls: World Tour's success.

On the one hand, yes I agree.

On the other don't underestimate the power of bored adults. I caught my wife watching the Gummi Bears on Disney+ a few days ago.

. . . I joined her. It holds up surprisingly well. It's no Tail Spin but not bad after a few beers. Pairs well with moderating internet slap fights.

Adbot
ADBOT LOVES YOU

Nebakenezzer
Sep 13, 2005

The Mote in God's Eye



Fly Molo posted:

And there’s that recent DNA evidence that the Plague of Justinian was actually Bubonic Plague. The people who did survive probably weren’t too fond of public gatherings after a few rounds of plague swept through.

So, wait, did people start to think bathing spread disease and stopped bathing?

MrYenko
Jun 17, 2012

#2 isn't ALWAYS bad...


Cyrano4747 posted:

I caught my wife watching the Gummi Bears on Disney+ a few days ago.

. . . I joined her.



Needs more David the Gnome, though.

Thomamelas
Mar 11, 2009


Cyrano4747 posted:

Not only that, but any money you have tied up that hasn't been earning is basically wasted. Once you've invested, say, $50 million you need it to be loving working. The opportunity costs of letting the product sit are huge, because the revenues are money that you can't reinvest in other projects. There's a business argument for releasing it even if you're going to take a loss on the product if it allows you to fund other projects that might be more profitable.

The deal with Apple is for $70 million for the streaming rights for 15 years. Sony keeps the China distribution rights and some other foreign markets. So Sony is in a position where it will break even and if does $30 million in China and another few million in the rest of the world then it becomes slightly profitable until the accountants get to it. And Apple is desperate for content. Apple TV+ hasn't had the uptake Apple hoped for, and it's looking for content. They likely overpaid but Sony gets an influx of cash for a film that would have been crushed in the post pandemic glut. And Apple gets something to advertise as HBOMax comes out.

GotLag
Jul 17, 2005

食べちゃダメだよ


sullat posted:

On the other hand, I doubt parents are going to be spending $20 bucks to have their kids watch Tom Hanks drive a boat just to get 90 minutes of WFH peace which is what drove Trolls: World Tour's success.

My parents would 100% have done this if the lockdown had happened when I was 10

aphid_licker
Jan 7, 2009

kiss kiss


Pillbug

Nebakenezzer posted:

So, wait, did people start to think bathing spread disease and stopped bathing?

Sitting in a communal tub of lukewarm water alongside everyone else in town will absolutely, definitely spread disease

ChubbyChecker
Mar 25, 2018
Probation
Can't post for 6 days!


Cessna posted:

$5 says they made their grad students do it.

No, it was themself.

Libluini
May 18, 2012

Did I predict the future?


Grimey Drawer

MrYenko posted:



Needs more David the Gnome, though.

David the Gnome was called David der Kabauter in German, which always confused the heck out of child-me. I basically only watched to hope for an explanation, but was always disappointed.

(In German, a "Kabauter" is some sort of dwarf-spirit, which in my part of Germany was completely unknown. Instead, we were more acquainted with the "Klabauter", which is some sort of ship-dwelling kobold. The trifecta of stupid is the fact that German kids would have known what a loving Gnome is. We call them Gnome instead of Gnomes. That's it.)

SeanBeansShako
Nov 20, 2009


You guys need a new compound word for regional Gnome confusion.

Deptfordx
Dec 23, 2013



How much small arms do warships carry in their ships armouries?

Do smaller ships that are more likely to be boarding carry proportionally more than their bigger cousins.

Just how much would a Battleship likely to have stowed away.

I know modern warships sometimes carry stingers or their equivalent SAM. What about ATGM's like the Javelin, or mortars/grenade launchers?

Kaiser Schnitzel
Mar 28, 2006

Schnitzel mit uns






SeanBeansShako posted:

You guys need a new compound word for regional Gnome confusion.

Gebietlichgnomeausdruckverwechslungschwierigkeit

Roughly translated as "Regional Gnome word confusion problem"

Usually abbreviated GeGnomAusVerSchi

Nenonen
Oct 22, 2009



Fallen Rib

Deptfordx posted:

I know modern warships sometimes carry stingers or their equivalent SAM. What about ATGM's like the Javelin, or mortars/grenade launchers?

1) there are no real space or weight constructions on a ship, so you could, but you could also carry something beefier instead
2) for naval purposes, those weapon classes are very short ranged and of limited firepower, might just bring more AAA/HMG which can be used against air and surface targets
3) many ATGM'S like the TOW can't actually be used over bodies of water - the IR beacon gets reflected which screws up the guidance system. Javelin works differently, but you would probably rather bring some longer ranged missile that packs more punch

MikeCrotch
Nov 5, 2011

I AM UNJUSTIFIABLY PROUD OF MY SPAGHETTI BOLOGNESE RECIPE

YES, IT IS AN INCREDIBLY SIMPLE DISH

NO, IT IS NOT NORMAL TO USE A PEPPERAMI INSTEAD OF MINCED MEAT

YES, THERE IS TOO MUCH SALT IN MY RECIPE

NO, I WON'T STOP SHARING IT

more like BOLLOCKnese


Park an Ontos on the deck of a ship

bewbies
Sep 23, 2003



Fun Shoe

if you have need of a javelin on a surface warship you have considerable problems

GotLag
Jul 17, 2005

食べちゃダメだよ


If you don't have a Javelin how are you going to kill that rear end in a top hat in the tank spawn-camping all your planes?

zoux
Apr 28, 2006



Grenrow posted:

The guy being quoted here...wasn't a historian. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_of_Wallingford_(d._1214)

And why is this dude who was born in 1152 being quoted as a source on the viking era, which would have been centuries earlier?

Because it's funny and also if you don't like sources from 3-400 years after the fact, you won't like the 1st millenium AD in Europe

Cessna
Feb 20, 2013

KHABAHBLOOOM

Deptfordx posted:

How much small arms do warships carry in their ships armouries?

As always, it depends on the ship, era, etc. Pretty much any ship is going to have something.

Pampanito (a WWII submarine) had a small arms locker located below the galley. (This is because the deck gun was located over the galley, and the small arms locker was in the magazine for the deck gun shells.) There wasn't an exact inventory, but I'd say there was space for about a dozen rifles and pistols.

The very well restored WWII destroyer, USS Kidd, says:

quote:

Just aft of the Captain’s stateroom and under the ladder leading up to the 01 level is a small closet known as the Small Arms Locker. In the Small Arms Locker was space for 22 rifles. The ship was equipped with rifles, pistols, and “Tommy guns”—Thompson submachine guns like those used by mobsters in the 1930s—to provide shipboard security and to equip a landing party should such a need arise. The rifles were also used by shipboard personnel on occasion to detonate floating mines found drifting near the ship.

Mr Enderby
Mar 28, 2015



Libluini posted:

(In German, a "Kabauter" is some sort of dwarf-spirit, which in my part of Germany was completely unknown. Instead, we were more acquainted with the "Klabauter", which is some sort of ship-dwelling kobold. The trifecta of stupid is the fact that German kids would have known what a loving Gnome is. We call them Gnome instead of Gnomes. That's it.)

Given it was coined by Paracelsus, gnome is more a German word than an English one.

KYOON GRIFFEY JR
Apr 12, 2010



It varies depending on era quite a bit as well. A 1900 era protected cruiser designed for showing the flag and trade protection in the colonies is going to carry enough small arms plus various boats launches etc to land a significant percentage of the crew as naval infantry - probably a full company sized formation. Several nations included specialized naval landing artillery for the purpose (notably the Russians), as well as of course a few automatic weapons and rifles, bayonets, and sidearms galore The cruiser had to be fully self-sustaining over a long period of time and conduct a lot of different types of operations.

An Arleigh Burke carries two RHIBs, so basically the maximum number of dudes you can put anywhere in one trip is 16 (two 8 person squads). They have M240s, M4s/16s, M14s, shotguns, sidearms, and less lethal weapons. I presume they also have hand grenades and possibly M203s. The most you will ever do is board a ship or post a shore guard. If it gets beyond that, different resources are required.

Kaiser Schnitzel
Mar 28, 2006

Schnitzel mit uns






When did most ships stop having a detachment of marines for boarding/shore harassment/putting down mutinies as was common during the age of sail?

Pryor on Fire
May 14, 2013


The Marines had to put down that lieberal who was trying to mutiny and take over an aircraft carrier like six weeks ago.

Cessna
Feb 20, 2013

KHABAHBLOOOM

Kaiser Schnitzel posted:

When did most ships stop having a detachment of marines for boarding/shore harassment/putting down mutinies as was common during the age of sail?

Marine detachments on capital ships (carriers, cruisers) were a thing up to the early 90s; I think 1995 was the last year. These days that role is handled by Navy Masters-at-Arms (essentially MPs).

Pryor on Fire
May 14, 2013


Nenonen posted:

3) many ATGM'S like the TOW can't actually be used over bodies of water - the IR beacon gets reflected which screws up the guidance system. Javelin works differently, but you would probably rather bring some longer ranged missile that packs more punch

I watched a video of ISIS putting an ATGM onto an Egyptian navy boat a few years ago. It seemed extremely effective, but no idea what kind of launcher/guidance system it had.

*I'm probably thinking of this one: https://www.reddit.com/r/CombatFoot...an_isis_kornet/

It seems like some of the wire based guidance systems just short out over water. The French SS.11/SS.12 is an example of a naval wire guided missile that sort of worked.

Pryor on Fire fucked around with this message at 17:04 on May 22, 2020

Mr Luxury Yacht
Apr 16, 2012




SS.11/SS.12 is MCLOS isn't it? So you're just steering it with a joystick, not having the launcher track an IR beacon in the missile.

Kemper Boyd
Aug 6, 2007

no kings, no gods, no masters but a comfy chair and no socks


At least some Finnish Navy warships carry AGS-17's on board for close up work.

FastestGunAlive
Apr 7, 2010

Dancing palm tree.


We (marines) would supplement the navy’s defense with some heavier stuff for ports and straits crossing but the navy just had rifles, shotguns, pistols, and mounted machine guns. Never saw any grenades or grenade launchers, that’d be a bad idea on a boat. Our recon guys didn’t even take GLs for ship clearing

zoux
Apr 28, 2006



The Navy also had F/A-18Es and cruise missiles, to be fair

Did the MEF take planes or ships to Iraq in 03

Vincent Van Goatse
Nov 8, 2006

Don't be so gloomy. After all it's not that awful. Like the fella says, in Italy for thirty years under the Borgias they had warfare, terror, murder, and bloodshed, but they produced Michelangelo, Leonardo da Vinci, and the Renaissance.




Smellrose

Kaiser Schnitzel posted:

When did most ships stop having a detachment of marines for boarding/shore harassment/putting down mutinies as was common during the age of sail?

The USMC essentially transitioned from being ship's police/landing parties to dudes whose job is amphibious warfare and/or "interventions" in the first decade or so of the 1900s. The fact the US might have to fight Japan was a major driver in this because to reach Japan US ships would need bases along the way, some of which had Japanese garrisons that had a different opinion. Suddenly having detachments of dudes who were basically infantrymen aboard ships made a lot of sense and there were was a weird period where, prior to creating permanent Marine ground units, it was expected the necessary marines would be carried in the fleet's individual ships instead of their own special transports.

Vincent Van Goatse fucked around with this message at 18:58 on May 22, 2020

FastestGunAlive
Apr 7, 2010

Dancing palm tree.


zoux posted:

The Navy also had F/A-18Es and cruise missiles, to be fair

Did the MEF take planes or ships to Iraq in 03

Both I believe

Cessna
Feb 20, 2013

KHABAHBLOOOM

Vincent Van Goatse posted:

The USMC essentially transitioned from being ship's police/landing parties to dudes whose job is amphibious warfare and/or "interventions" in the first decade or so of the 1900s.

This is true, but the USMC still had Detachments on ships for another 90 or so years. The USMC has lots of those "other duties" jobs, like providing guards for embassies.

Vincent Van Goatse
Nov 8, 2006

Don't be so gloomy. After all it's not that awful. Like the fella says, in Italy for thirty years under the Borgias they had warfare, terror, murder, and bloodshed, but they produced Michelangelo, Leonardo da Vinci, and the Renaissance.




Smellrose

Cessna posted:

This is true, but the USMC still had Detachments on ships for another 90 or so years. The USMC has lots of those "other duties" jobs, like providing guards for embassies.

Yeah. I was speaking more in terms of organizational identity than their actual work and even then I was oversimplifying immensely.

Cessna
Feb 20, 2013

KHABAHBLOOOM

Vincent Van Goatse posted:

Yeah. I was speaking more in terms of organizational identity than their actual work and even then I was oversimplifying immensely.

If you want to get REALLY nitpicky, that was job #2 of the USMC under their mission statement from the National Security Act of 1947, which was foundational to the post-WWII military:

quote:

(1)The Marine Corps shall be organized, trained, and equipped to:

(a) Provide Fleet Marine Forces of combined arms, together with supporting air components, for service with the United States Fleet in the seizure or defense of advanced naval bases and for the conduct of such land operations as may be essential to the prosecution of a naval campaign.

(b) Provide detachments and organizations for service on armed vessels of the Navy, and security detachments for the protection of naval property at naval stations and bases.

(c) Develop, in coordination with the Army, Navy, and Air Force, the doctrines, tactics, techniques, and equipment employed by landing forces in amphibious operations.The Marine Corps shall have primary interest in the development of those landing force doctrines, tactics, techniques, and equipment which are of common interest to the Army and the Marine Corps.

(d) Provide, as required, Marine forces for airborne operations, in coordination with the Army, the Navy, and the Air Force and in accordance with doctrine established by the Joint Chiefs of Staff.

(e) Develop, in coordination with the Army, the Navy, and the Air Force doctrines, procedures, and equipment of interest to the Marine Corps for airborne operations which are not provided for by the Army.

(f) Be prepared, in accordance with integrated joint mobilization plans, for the expansion of the peacetime components to meet the needs of war.

(g) Perform such other duties as the President may direct.

Milo and POTUS
Sep 3, 2017

I will not shut up about the Mighty Morphin Power Rangers. I talk about them all the time and work them into every conversation I have. I built a shrine in my room for the yellow one who died because sadly no one noticed because she died around 9/11. Wanna see it?


Kemper Boyd posted:

At least some Finnish Navy warships carry AGS-17's on board for close up work.

Is that because of all the islands in the surrounding waters connecting via ice or ?

mllaneza
Apr 28, 2007


Veteran, Bermuda Triangle Expeditionary Force, 1993-1952





Cessna posted:

Marine detachments on capital ships (carriers, cruisers) were a thing up to the early 90s; I think 1995 was the last year. These days that role is handled by Navy Masters-at-Arms (essentially MPs).

So, in cases where nuclear weapons are embarked, who guards them ? Navy or USMC personnel ?

I had a buddy who's duty assignments on the Midway included a lot of standing around with loaded weapons outside a specific magazine.

Kemper Boyd
Aug 6, 2007

no kings, no gods, no masters but a comfy chair and no socks


Milo and POTUS posted:

Is that because of all the islands in the surrounding waters connecting via ice or ?

Prolly, they've also used them for Atalanta patrols near the Somalian coast.

Alan Smithee
Jan 3, 2005


I've always been curious about Vietcong traps post Vietnam war . Do they still find those things? Do civilians get maimed/killed by those things frequently?

Dance Officer
May 4, 2017

It would be awesome if we could dance!


Alan Smithee posted:

I've always been curious about Vietcong traps post Vietnam war . Do they still find those things? Do civilians get maimed/killed by those things frequently?

I can't really speak for traps, but there's still a few million mines buried in Vietnam, and they continue to claim victims

Nebakenezzer
Sep 13, 2005

The Mote in God's Eye



Speaking of Vietnam, Here's something I'd love to hear Cessna's opinion on.

Ensign Expendable
Nov 11, 2008

Родина слышит




Pillbug

T-34 and T-44 (1941)

Queue: T-43 (1942), T-43 (1943), Maus development in 1943-44, Trials of the LT vz. 35 in the USSR, Development of Slovakian tank forces 1939-1941, T-46, SU-76M (SU-15M) production, Object 237 (IS-1 prototype), ISU-122, Object 704, Jagdpanzer IV, VK 30.02 DB and other predecessors of the Panther, RSO tank destroyer, Sd.Kfz. 10/4, Czech anti-tank rifles in German service, Hotchkiss H 39/Pz.Kpfw.38H(f) in German service, Flakpanzer 38(t), Grille series, Jagdpanther, Boys and PIAT, Heavy Tank T26E5, History of German diesel engines for tanks, King Tiger trials in the USSR, T-44 prototypes, T-44 prototypes second round, Black Prince, PT-76, M4A3E2 Jumbo Sherman, M4A2 Sherman in the Red Army, T-54, T-44 prototypes, T-44 prototypes second round, T-44 production, Soviet HEAT anti-tank grenades, T-34-85M, Myths of Soviet tank building: interbellum tanks, Light Tank M24, German anti-tank rifles, PT-76 modernizations, ISU-122 front line impressions, German additional tank protection (zimmerit, schurzen, track links), Winter and swamp tracks, Paper light tank destroyers, Allied intel on the Maus , Summary of French interbellum tank development, Medium Tank T20, Medium Tank T23, Myths of Soviet tank building, GMC M10, Tiger II predecessors, Pz.Kpfw.IV Ausf.H-J,IS-6, SU-101/SU-102/Uralmash-1, Centurion Mk.I, SU-100 front line impressions, IS-2 front line impressions, Myths of Soviet tank building: early Great Patriotic War, Influence of the T-34 on German tank building, Medium Tank T25, Heavy Tank T26/T26E1/T26E3, Career of Harry Knox, GMC M36, Geschützwagen Tiger für 17cm K72 (Sf), Early Early Soviet tank development (MS-1, AN Teplokhod), Career of Semyon Aleksandrovich Ginzburg, AT-1, Object 140, SU-76 frontline impressions, Creation of the IS-3, IS-6, SU-5, Myths of Soviet tank building: 1943-44, IS-2 post-war modifications, Myths of Soviet tank building: end of the Great Patriotic War


Available for request:


RPG-1 NEW


HMC M7 Priest


15 cm sFH 13/1 (Sf)
Oerlikon and Solothurn anti-tank rifles


Lahti L-39


AMR 35 ZT

Adbot
ADBOT LOVES YOU

Solaris 2.0
May 14, 2008



Berlin WW2 bombing survivor Saturn the alligator dies in Moscow Zoo https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-52784240

quote:


Saturn was gifted to Berlin Zoo in 1936 soon after he was born in the US. He escaped the zoo being bombed in 1943.
British soldiers found him three years later and gave him to the Soviet Union.
How he spent the intervening years always remained a mystery, but since July 1946 the alligator has been a hit with visitors in Moscow.

I’m loving the idea there was a sewer gator hanging around WWII era Berlin for 3 years and somehow survived the Battle of Berlin as well.

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • Post
  • Reply
«342 »