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FauxhawkSatan
Mar 27, 2010


Note from the Author: There is going to be some discussion by and about LEO and military people so if you hate cops or whatever just donít post here. You can post in the other hot topic threads instead. This is also more geared to tactical type gear so if you think tactical stuff is lame and dumb, donít post in here telling everyone how stupid they look. Lets just keep this about gear and the use of said gear.


Want to be the coolest, lowest drag operator at the range? Want to know what the best armor is for whatever doomsday scenario you have in your crazy mind? Do you just want quality firearm related gear? This is the thread for you.

Thereís a lot of shooting related gear that arenít guns or gun parts and this thread is to discuss such gear. Several other threads have gear discussion related to that thread topic (IE ccw thread, hunting thread, and competition thread) but there is a lot of gear that doesnít always fall into those categories so this can be a catch all for all gear related questions, even if there is overlap.

Iím going to start with different categories of gear and try to explain the different types and then will post about what I have and why I use it. Iím going to avoid going into detail since this covers lots of areas. Iíll just mention the topics and areas I have in mind and let people post their own questions or comments with further detail.

First line, Second line, and Third Line gear
Your gear can be broken into three main categories, first, second, and third line. This is a way or prioritizing the gear and the accessibility of it. First line is considered items you may need right away and are carried on your persons at all times such as gun, mags, ifak, small tools, comms, etc. Second line are items to sustain yourself but aren't always immediately needed and are typically kept in a small bag within easy reach. Items like spare parts, batteries, food/water, extra mags, more tools. Third line are items that are used less frequent then second line and kept in another bag also.

Holsters

This is where we will get a lot of overlap with the CCW and competition thread but I will still include those types of holsters here. Holsters hold your gun on your persons in a position where you can draw and fire it with relative ease.

Holsters can be divided into two main groups, Inside the waistband (IWB) and outside the waistband (OWB) holsters. They are exactly what they say, it depends on where the holsters sit inside the waistband. IWB holsters are pretty much only used for concealed carry and tuck inside the waistband and usually have clips that come over the top of a belt or waistband. OWB holsters are your typical holsters that thread on a belt and ride on the outside of your pants. These are used for call kinds of purposes and cater to various niches.


IWB and OWB holsters

They are usually made from two types of materials, leather or some sort of hard plastic (kydex or some sort of injection molded plastic).

Inside the waistband holsters

Iím not going to go super in depth here because we have the CCW thread but I still think any questions regarding holsters can be posted here. As mentioned earlier, these go inside the pants and usually clip on the belt. They are usually worn on the strong side hip but appendix carry is gaining popularity and that positions the gun at the 12:00 position on the body. Different people carry in different positions ranging from 5:00 on the body to 12:00. This is highly dependent on body type, gun size, and holster design.

Outside the waistband holsters

These are worn on a belt of sorts and what are typically pictured when you think holster. These are pretty much always going to be worn on the strong side hip at 3:00. You can get OWB holsters that ride real close to the body and/or higher up on the belt concealed carry, ones that stick out and barely hold the gun for competition, ones that have active retention for duty use, have one's strapped your leg like robocop, and all kinds of variations.

I will go into duty/retention holsters a bit since there is not really a thread that covers that. These are the holsters you see cops or soldiers wearing typically. The generally stick out to aid in drawing since concealment doesnít matter and have some sort of active retention system to keep the gun in the holster. This means you have activate/push something to unlock the gun to draw. Safariland came up with the different levels of retention and generally the biggest player when it comes to duty holsters. Level 1 is just passive retention only, basically it's just friction that holds the gun in place and the gun can be easily drawn. Level 2 will have one active retention system like a thumb break or hood that must be moved to draw the gun. Level 3 has two active systems like the hood and some sort of other lock. A good design will incorporate the unlocking motion into the draw stroke so it's not much slower like Safarilands ALS/SLS system. A bad design will either be slow to draw or dangerous by making your trigger finger activate a button near the trigger like the Blackhawk Serpa holster. Donít use Serpa holsters.


A typical level III Safariland holster

There are other types of holsters like chest holsters, shoulder holsters, ankle holsters, etc and they have their specific roles. If you have a question, just ask.

Magazine pouches

Now that you have something to hold your gun, youíll need something to hold your magazines. These are either worn on your belt or on a chest rig/armor carrier. Belt pouches are going to depend on the type of belt and use. Carrying a spare magazine for your concealed carry gun is different than carrying spare duty mags which is different than carrying mags in a competition. The way the mount will also vary. If you are using a war belt with molle will generally have molle mounted pouches, non-molle belts will typically thread on the belt somehow, and some have clips that can clip on and off without threading the belt. Different pouches will also have different levels of retention, depending on use.

Pistol mag pouches are obviously for pistol mags. These are generally worn with the top of the mag down and bullets pointed clockwise for right handed shooters or counter for left handed or bullets outward. There are horizontal pouches you can use as well and many cops use horizontal pouches for some reason. There are pistol specific pouches for one type of magazine or ďuniversal onesĒ that fit multiple types. Rifle pouches hold rifle mags and are worn with the top of the mag facing down and can point either way, depending on how you grip the mag for reloading.

Other Pouches

There are all kinds of other pouches you can get that hold stuff like grenades, radios, handcuffs, admin pouches to hold notebooks or pens, dump pouches to throw whatever into, medical gear, and all kinds of stuff. If youíre looking for something specific, there is probably a pouch for it.

You can see various mag pouches and other pouches in the belt photo below.

Belts

Now that you got your guns and magazines in things to hold them, how do you hold those things? The answer is typically a belt. Belts used to hold all your shooting gear is different than a typical belt solely used to hold your pants up because it needs to support more weight. Gun belts will generally be stiffer than a standard belt and belts designed to carry a lot of gear externally, as opposed to IWB/concealed carry belts, will often have some sort of inner/outer belt design.

These belts are typically referred to as duty belts, war belts, or competition belts. These typically work by having an external belt that carries all your gear and everything is left attached. You then just wear this belt on the outside of your pants and not threaded inside the loops. On a lot of designs, especially duty and competition belts, there is an inner belt that is threaded through the pants and the outer belt attaches to the inner belt with either velcro or belt keepers (basically straps that go around both belts). Inner/outer belt systems are typically 1.75in-2.25 wide and can have molle on the external belt to attach items or items be threaded on like a typical belt.

Traditional war or battle belts were more of a sleeve design where you had a belt that ran through a large sleeve with molle on it and everything attached to the sleeve via the molle. These didnít interface with a belt that ran through your pants and relied on things like non-slip materials or suspenders to stay in place. These were usually much larger than duty belts.



This photo shows the difference of more modern inner/outer belt systems and older designs. The top belt is a Ronin with 2 rows of molle. Items can either be threaded on the outer belt or attached via molle. The outer belt attaches to the inner belt, which is threaded through pant loops, via velcro on each belt. The bottom belt is an older HSGI battle belt and is much larger. You can see the belt threads through the sleeve and all the pouches are attached on the molle except for the holster. The sleeve allows parts of belt to be exposed to thread on items like holsters.

The trend right now is to the smaller inner/outer belts as opposed to the big padded belts. This is because they are lighter and less bulky and easier to set up.

Chest Rigs

Some people elect to carry items on chest rigs instead of belts. Chest rigs are pretty much exactly what they sound like, a device that straps onto your chest with various pouches. Carrying items on your torso is more comfortable than a belt because it supports the weight better but having a bunch of items on your chest can be awkward in certain positions like prone. A basic chest carrier does not have any armor, but I will get into armor carrier in a bit. Some chest rigs have built in pouches and arenít configurable and some just have molle and allow you to attach whatever you want. These are useful if you are in plain clothes 99% of the time but want something you can throw on without dicking around with a belt to have access to more gear.



Body Armor

Body armor falls into two categories, hard or soft armor. Hard armor is a hard plate, typically made out of a ceramic composite (older ones being steel and there are some polymer hard plates also) and are usually rated to stop various rifle rounds. Soft armor is made from a kevlar composite and is a flexible sheet of various thicknesses that can bend and is only rated for pistol rounds. Below is an image that shows the different level ratings and typically what they can stop. This isnít standard for ever piece of armor and each manufacturer might be slightly different. There is a standard rating system done by the National Institute of Justice (NIJ) that will rate armor for each rating but not every manufacturer tests their armor to the standards. It is up to the consumer to know the ratings and abilities of the specific armor you purchase. Soft Armor is going to be level II or IIIA only and hard armor can be rated up to IV. Some armor has special ratings that donít fall into the NIJ ratings.



Hard armor is worn in external plate carriers. These are typically worn over any clothes since they are thicker than soft armor but there are a few concealable carriers. The plates are rigid and come in different cuts and sizes. Because they are rigid and do not conform to your body, they are designed to only cover vitals and must be properly fitted. Here is a good article about that. http://sixty-six.org/files/GUNFIGHT...ar_of_armor.pdf


Different cuts of hard armor

Plate carries can come in all kinds of designs with all kinds of features. Some have pouches built in, some have molle or other methods of attaching pouches, and some are slick with no way to attach anything.

Soft armor is a pliable sheet made up of multiple layers of Kevlar or other fabrics designed to stop fast moving objects. These are only rated for pistol rounds but are lighter than hard plates typically. Since they can conform to your body they have a bit more coverage and can be worn under clothes in concealable carriers or in external carriers as well. Soft armor is not stab proof and a knife will typically go straight through soft armor. There is stab proof armor that can incorporated into soft ballistic armor or as a stand alone system where guns aren't a huge threat but sharp weapons are such as Correctional Officers.

Medical Gear

If you typically carry a gun for work and/or work in an environment where people might get shot/hurt a way to carry medical gear is a good idea. This can vary to an Individual First Aid Kit (IFAK) which is a small pouch just for you or maybe one other person to a large kit with supplies for multiple people. IFAKís are designed to be worn on your person like on a belt, chest rig, or armor vest. Larger kits are typically stand alone bags you can grab but some can be attached your kit. A quick rundown on items in a first aid kit are;

-Tourniquet: Tourniquets (TQís) are used to stop bleeding on extremities after suffering a traumatic injury. Traumatic injury to an extremity is often cited as the number one killer in combat environments due to lethal blood loss. Tourniquets work by applying force around the extremity above the wound and cutting off blood flow. These used to be thought of as dangerous due to possible tissue damage from no blood flow but after being at war for so long, various combat medical industry experts figured out they were the best way to prevent death. Tissue damage is really only a concern if the TQ is left on for like 6+ hours. There are a bunch of different tqís out there but not all of them are any good. The Committee on Tactical Combat Casualty Care (CoTCCC) is the governing body on what tqís actually work and they only have a few approved ones. The two big ones are the Combat Application Tourniquet (CAT) by North American Rescue or the SOF Tactical Tourniquet Wide (SOFTT-W) by Tactical Medical solutions. Hereís an article with the most up to date list to my knowledge. https://www.offgridweb.com/preparat...-list-for-2019/

-Chest Seals: Chest seals are devices used to seal sucking chest wounds. A Chest seal is used to seal a penetrating chest wound to keep pressure from building inside the chest cavity and collapsing a lung. If a person has a punctured lung as well, pressure will build from the person breathing and you need to periodically release pressure.This can be done by just pulling the seal up briefly every few minutes or by the use of a vented chest seal which acts as a one way valve to allow air out but not in.

-Packing gauze: These are used to pack a wound to control bleeding in the case of a wound in spots TQís or chest seals wont work. This is basically just gauze that you shove into the wound as deep as you can and apply pressure until bleeding stops.

-Hemostatic Agents: Another popular medical item to carry when gunshot wounds are a possibility are hemostatic agents. These items help promote rapid coagulation of blood to reduce or stop blood loss when pressure won't suffice. The two main brands in this category are Quikclot and Celox. Quikclot used to come in a powder form that was poured into the wound and reacted to liquid causing a thermal reaction that would cauterize the wound which was painful to use and would also burn your eyes if the wind blew it into them while trying to treat a wound. The formula was changed to one that does not produce a chemical burn but is still effective. The active ingredient is kaolin. Celox is another alternative but uses chitosan, which is derived from shellfish and may cause issues with those allergic to shellfish. Both are widely available in an impregnated gauze form as mentioned above or as stand alone material you pour into a wound.

-Other bandages. There are different types of external pressure bandages like Israili bandages,H bandages, compression bandages, and others that are wrapped around a less severe wound to control blood flow. These typically wont stop an arterial bleed.

-Other medical items: Gunshot wounds are pretty rare in range environment and non-combat areas. It's a good idea to also keep some basic first aid kit items near by such as chewable aspirin's for heart attacks (probably the most likely life saving measure most people will encounter), small bandaids for minor things, neosporin, and other such small items. Keep this separate from the more severe items up top because if you have a major trauma you don't want to be dicking around a giant first aid kit for your TQ. Keep a blow-out kit with the major items and another kit for this small stuff.

Iím no expert on this stuff but have some basic training in it. If you want to carry med gear, I highly recommend getting some training on how and when to use it. Stop the Bleed is a program by the Red Cross that teaches people on the use of this stuff. Below is a good diagram on what type of items to use on the body.



Night Optical Devices (NODS)/ Night Vision

This is the fancy wizard eyes that lets you see in the dark. I know very little so Iíll let someone else effort post about it. The Rat made a post with some basic NOD info here. https://forums.somethingawful.com/s...hreadid=3825678

Lights

If you're too poor to afford NODS then stop being poor first but until that you can use lights. I'm going to break this into two types of lights, weapon mounted and handheld. Weapon mounted lights are just that, lights mounted to weapons, be it pistols or long guns. These are great because you don't need a second hand to operate a light and can keep both hands on the weapon. Downside is that you have to point your gun at stuff to light it up but this can be mitigated by using light splash to light up an area as opposed to directly point a light at it. Typically, the controls on these are placed in a position you can use without altering your firing grip.



Handheld lights are your typical flashlight. They range in all kinds of sizes and brightness and take various types of batteries. I'm in the camp that believes you can never have enough lumens (lumens measure how bright a light is), the brighter the better in any situation. Some people think you'll blind yourself with too bright of a light but they are wrong and with proper training and use you won't. Lumens isn't the only factor about light output though, candela measures how far the light is thrown and is important if you are using the light outdoors or in large areas. Light splash, hotspot, and color can also affect how a light is used.

Clothing items

Stuff like boots, gloves, pants, etc can also be discussed here.

Bags, cases, etc.

There is a lot of stuff that isn't carried on your person but in various types of bags/cases. Obviously there are rifle/gun cases to hold weapons/mags, "go-bags"or "bug-out" bags for second line stuff, three-day bags to hold items for typically three day long excursions, and other even larger bags. There are also specialized kit bags for items like med gear or comm gear.

LEO/Military specific gear

Gear specific to LEO or military people can be discussed here as well. I know we have a few posters in both groups to answer questions. Stuff like handcuffs, tasers, comms gear, whatever that a typical non leo or military person would never use.

Other gear not listed
If theres an area I missed but you feel belongs in here just post. I don't want to limit everyone to my very limited knowledge on things.

FauxhawkSatan fucked around with this message at 23:05 on Sep 9, 2019

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FauxhawkSatan
Mar 27, 2010


Space reserved for effort posts made by other users and for recommended manufacturers links

FauxhawkSatan
Mar 27, 2010


This post is for me to talk about my personal gear I own and use for work as a patrol officer with less than 5 years on. I'm not here to post about my actual work or my experiences unless it pertains to the gear I'm talking about. If you have non-gear related cop questions look elsewhere for the answers.

My duty belt is currently an Esstac 2in Shooter's belt in black. This is an inner/outer system with a slick belt, meaning no molle. The inner belt has the soft velcro side on so it doesn't tear up my clothes or car seats if I'm just wearing that and the outer belt has the hard side velcro. All the items are threaded on via belt loops and a few items designed for 2.25in wide belts have zip ties to keep them in place. I had a 2.25in Bianchi Accumold belt issued to me which was solidly ok. The Bianchi was floppier despite being wider and thicker and would stretch over time. The Esstac keeps everything from flopping out and is lighter and less bulky overall which makes it more comfortable.



Going from left to right I have two spare glock 9mm mags with Dawson extensions in Esstac Kywi double pouch, an Axon Taser X2 in it's supplied holster in a cross draw configuration, a flash light holder which typically has a Streamlight Protac HL-X light, a baton ring, S&W model 100 hinged handcuffs in a Safariland handcuff strap, Safariland 6360RDS lvl III holster with a Glock 17 mos in it, a key holder, and a bianchi single handcuff case with a set of regular S&W model 100 cuffs in it.

I wear an external soft armor vest carrier made by Pointblank. I have mounted on that my radio, an IFAK, and a SOFTT-W tourniquet. I keep a notebook in the pockets as well my wallet and some other small items like pens and another handcuff key.



I also have an issued plate carrier with Hesco plates. The carrier is an older design First Spear carrier that is pretty basic and just ok with 2 AR mags on it and 2 more TQ's in the pouch. I'll be replacing this in the near-ish future but this stays mostly in my vehicle.



I also carry a variety of small other items on me in my pockets. Another flashlight because two is one and all that, a knife, nitrile gloves (the most used item after a flashlight), small baggies for putting drugs in, and a property bag to put people's property in.

I also have a second Esstac belt setup for training/competition shooting. I'm using the Esstac mag pouches on it as well and a Safariland belt mount with QLS system. The QLS system allows me to easily change the holster. I have this on my duty belt as well to allow me to take off my gun with the holster for entering secured areas.



I also have a large first aid kit with like 6 more tq's, more chest seals, more gauze, and more bandages. In my duty bag I carry spare batteries, a binder full of papers I need, tissues, hand sanitizer, a small clipboard, ticket books, leg restraints, and anything else I use at work.

Kommienzuspadt
Apr 28, 2004

U like it


Doc_Awesome posted:

Medical stuff

Just a a brief missive from my soap-box on this issue:

If you are going to buy buying a trauma kit to carry to the range, keep in your car, etc, then PLEASE also take a class on Adult CPR from either the Red Cross or the American Heart Association.

As mentioned in the OP, unless you are in the military, the most common medical emergency you are likely to encounter on the range will be some kind of cardiovascular event (eg heart attack). Generally speaking, shooting is a pretty safe sport and cardiovascular disease is the #1 cause of death in the world, so the odds you will need to do CPR are exponentially higher than the need for a TQ.

I know the idea of throwing a chest dart into someone with a sucking chest wound is sexy, but the odds you will need this equipment and skillset are far lower than the need to be able to provide quality bystander CPR. Good quality chest compressions can absolutely save lives, but you will save zero lives if your only knowledge of CPR comes from TV.

Speaking of which, decompression needles (aka chest darts) are NOT a good idea. In the very unlikely event that a bystander develops traumatic pneumothorax, it is even less likely that it will be life threatening (eg tension pneumothorax) before they get to a hospital. Using these needles incorrectly can cause serious injury and their use is even discouraged among paramedics for this reason. If you have little to no formal medical training, you have no business owning or carrying one of these.

A few more misc points:

1. As mentioned in the OP, 4x 81mg chewable baby aspirins given to someone who is suffering from a heart attack (but is still conscious and breathing) can dramatically improve their odds of survival and functional recovery. Make sure you know to recognize the symptoms and keep a fresh, unopened bottle anywhere you'd consider keeping an IFAK or other trauma kit. Chewable baby aspirin is super cheap - I have bottles in my car, backpack, range bag...

2. All of the trauma kit you are buying is useless unless you know how to use it. If you buy a TQ, buy a second TQ you can use to practice with (do NOT use a TQ you are keeping for emergency use! they wear over time). Practice applying it to yourself. Learn to find your pulse in your legs/feet and wrists . If you apply the TQ correctly, your pulse will disappear. It will also hurt like a motherfucker. Practice so you know how to use the drat thing, because it is not a skill you want to learn while someone is exsanguinating in front of you.

3. You should also keep a 'booboo' kit in your range bag for common, non emergent medical issues like bumps, cuts, headaches, etc. I like these kits.

4. As a final point, generally speaking, there is a very limited list of things that you can do for a seriously injured person in a pre-hospital setting; particularly if you are not a paramedic with an ambulance full of medical supplies. Ultimately, someone who has been shot needs a surgeon; someone having a heart attack needs the cath lab.

Your job as a bystander is to have the basic skills and equipment to provide immediate life-saving first aid and then to get to get EMS on scene ASAP. If you are in a remote area far from EMS, call 911 anyway; paramedics can meet you half-way and can provide life-saving care that you cannot (intubation and ventilation etc) as well as make sure you get to the appropriate hospital for your patient(s). You don't want to drop a GSW off at a free-standing ED/urgent care.

One last point:

Doc_Awesome posted:


-Hemostatic Agents: Quikclot used to come in a powder form that was poured into the wound and reacted to liquid causing a thermal reaction that would cauterize the wound which was painful to use and would also burn your eyes if the wind blew it into them while trying to treat a wound. The formula was changed to one that does not produce a chemical burn but is still effective. The active ingredient is kaolin. Celox is another alternative but uses chitosan, which is derived from shellfish and may cause issues with those allergic to shellfish. Both are widely available in an impregnated gauze form as mentioned above or as stand alone material you pour into a wound.


Hemostatic powders cause burns because they work via an exothermic reaction. Does not really help cauterize the wound, just burns the poo poo outta your patient.

You want to use hemostatic agent impregnated bandages and not the powder. These agents are not strong enough to tamponade life-threatening bleeds on their own, so there really is no point to using the powder.

FWIW, the evidence for the use of hemostatic agents is kinda weak too (see p.173 of this pdf. I have regular bandages in all of my trauma kits. Hemostatic dressings won't hurt, just not worth the expense to me personally. YMMV.

Kommienzuspadt fucked around with this message at 17:24 on Sep 10, 2019

thr33n0r
Nov 18, 2006
www.theowla.com

As a paramedic myself, I agree strongly with the above post.

pantslesswithwolves
Oct 27, 2008

Ba-dam ba-DUMMMMMM


Pillbug

In addition to Kommieís great post, his GSW thread from a few years ago should be required reading if youíre considering putting together an IFAK. Iím linking to it her.

I have a battle belt that Iíve put together for range use, and the IFAK on that contains a CAT, a packet of Combat Gauze, and an ETD. Another CAT rides on my belt at the 1230 position. I also have some chewable Aspirin in there because Kommie is 100% right that in most cases, sudden cardiac arrest is going to present itself without penetrating lead poisoning.

honda whisperer
Mar 29, 2009



I don't know who in tfr said it the first time, but I'm quoting a better poster than I.

Gear thread: I'm not gear queer, I'm metro tactical

Butch Cassidy
Jul 28, 2010



I also like to keep something sugary with my med kit. Not only do I have diabetics close to me but have run into several developing hypoglycemia halfway up mountains. Being diabetics, they pften enough don't tend to have junk food around to self-treat. Granola bars last forever, are compact, and weigh pretty much nothing. Powdered drink mix likewise.

As for flashlights, I dig Steamlight's Stylus Pro. Takes a couple AAA batteries for ubiquitous resupply and availability of inexpensive rechargeable cells. Bright enough to shoot with, can win a flashlight duel with a dollar store light, small enough for most men to keep one on their person, and around twenty bucks to buy several to scatter around versus one more spendy unit. The number of coworkers on my shift who don't carry a light never fails to astound me.

The Rat
Aug 29, 2004

You will find no one to help you here. Beth DuClare has been dissected and placed in cryonic storage.


honda whisperer posted:

I don't know who in tfr said it the first time, but I'm quoting a better poster than I.

Gear thread: I'm not gear queer, I'm metro tactical

They're real and they're spectacular



I have some opinions and preferences, but I dunno what people are interested in.

Thelonious
Jul 15, 2005



thr33n0r posted:

As a paramedic myself, I agree strongly with the above post.

Empty quote

Edit: Butch mentioned sugary poo poo for diabetics and granola bars. Gonna have to disagree on giving somebody chewy and chokey stuff as glucose. Oral glucose or a small tube of decorative cake frosting is gonna fare a lot better imo.

Thelonious fucked around with this message at 02:56 on Sep 10, 2019

beanieson
Sep 25, 2008

I had the opportunity to change literally anything about the world and I used it to get a new av


Posted without comment

The Rat
Aug 29, 2004

You will find no one to help you here. Beth DuClare has been dissected and placed in cryonic storage.


BOUT TO GET hosed WITH THE LONG DICK OF THE LAWWW

Butch Cassidy
Jul 28, 2010



Thelonious posted:

...Gonna have to disagree on giving somebody chewy and chokey stuff as glucose. Oral glucose or a small tube of decorative cake frosting is gonna fare a lot better imo.

Depends how out of it they are. Have personally had better luck offering "real food" to people in need of a boost than chalky tablets.

Miso Beno
Apr 29, 2004


Tryin' to catch me ridin' dirty


Fun Shoe

In an off forum discussion I had with Kommie, there is a significant difference between chewable aspirin and regular old aspirin that could change the course of a heart attack. Make sure you're keeping the chewable stuff in your kit. You might also want to note on the bottle the correct number of pills for a heart attack based on the pill dosage.

I've been carrying the regular dosage coated stuff in my travel and daily first aid kits but will be upgrading to the chewable low dose stuff asap.

Dr Ozziemandius
Apr 28, 2011

Ozzie approves

On the glucosey stuff, most pharmacies sell chewable glucose tablets, basically compressed Tang/glucose. They stay good for basically ever if they donít get wet, and a couple of them will bring somebodyís BS up really quickly, as well as being quick to dissolve on chewing so thereís little chance of choking. I have all my diabetic patients keep them on hand in their car/purse/desk/whatever.


Anybody have a recommendation for good tactical boots with a wide toebox? Iím hoping to get a job in the federal prison system here soon (as a medical director, not guard or anything), and I guess I need something in the line of tac boots to wear with the shank-resistant vest and belt/whatever. Steeltoes are frowned upon from what I gathered. Iíve got some Danner tacticalish boots Iíve worn forever, but theyíre kinda beat up and honestly just loving huge and heavy to clomp around in.

BrianM87
Oct 30, 2006
I keep missing. Are you sure the bullets work?

My old rifle and plate carrier from when I was with the Park Ranger division (Before they fired us all by cutting the budget and rehired me back to the patrol division.)



The carrier was a special order made for us by Propper, and I absolutely hated it. The undersides had zero padding and I would have preferred a cummerbund. Anytime we had to wear them while going through the forest was miserable. Let me keep two rifle magazines and two pistol magazines, plus NAR CAT in the center. There's a clotting bandage in the pouch directly behind the tourniquet.

A note for anyone wanting tourniquets: For the love of god don't buy the cheap ones on amazon. Actually, don't buy on on amazon at all. Most of them are fake and the windlass will snap when you try to tighten them. Also what Kommie said about them. Don't practice with the one you intend to use, buy a duplicate.

Once I'm home I'll add in my duty belts.

BrianM87 fucked around with this message at 14:21 on Sep 10, 2019

beanieson
Sep 25, 2008

I had the opportunity to change literally anything about the world and I used it to get a new av


What light is that, thing is huge

BrianM87
Oct 30, 2006
I keep missing. Are you sure the bullets work?

Streamlight TLR-1 HPL. It is huge and ridiculous, but my pleas for surefire scouts fell on deaf ears until I was allowed to just use my own rifle after I went to patrol. Basically all our rifles were outfitted exactly the same per the range master at that time. Once he retired we were allowed a little leeway to change things up. And then the new range master who I was friends with died and things started rapidly going to poo poo at the range/training center, and the political environment simultaneously shifted for the worse at the department (Some how someone went from patrolman, to Sergeant., to Captain in less than 6 months...)so I left at the beginning of August.

BrianM87 fucked around with this message at 14:55 on Sep 10, 2019

The Rat
Aug 29, 2004

You will find no one to help you here. Beth DuClare has been dissected and placed in cryonic storage.


E;fb

Looks like a TLR-1 HPL.

FauxhawkSatan
Mar 27, 2010


Dr Ozziemandius posted:

On the glucosey stuff, most pharmacies sell chewable glucose tablets, basically compressed Tang/glucose. They stay good for basically ever if they donít get wet, and a couple of them will bring somebodyís BS up really quickly, as well as being quick to dissolve on chewing so thereís little chance of choking. I have all my diabetic patients keep them on hand in their car/purse/desk/whatever.


Anybody have a recommendation for good tactical boots with a wide toebox? Iím hoping to get a job in the federal prison system here soon (as a medical director, not guard or anything), and I guess I need something in the line of tac boots to wear with the shank-resistant vest and belt/whatever. Steeltoes are frowned upon from what I gathered. Iíve got some Danner tacticalish boots Iíve worn forever, but theyíre kinda beat up and honestly just loving huge and heavy to clomp around in.

I wear Danner Acadia non-insulated boots for work and really like them. They are pretty comfy for wearing 8-12 hours at a time but are a bit heavy. I'm not sure on the toebox though. I know a lot of people really like the Under Armor duty boots and they are lightweight but not all that durable. If you're not running around a bunch and stepping in a bunch of poo poo all the time they'll probably last a while. I've also heard good things about the Oakley SI boots but I think they look dumb.

Kommienzuspadt
Apr 28, 2004

U like it


BrianM87 posted:

A note for anyone wanting tourniquets: For the love of god don't buy the cheap ones on amazon. Actually, don't buy on on amazon at all. Most of them are fake and the windlass will snap when you try to tighten them. Also what Kommie said about them. Don't practice with the one you intend to use, buy a duplicate.


Yeah, for tourniquets, the only ones worth owning are the those endorsed by Comittee on Tactical Combat Casualty Care. They recently expanded this list - see here - but IMO the two most well vetted via real-world use are the the CAT-T by North American Rescue or the SOFT-TW by Tactical Medical Solutions.

Miso Beno posted:

In an off forum discussion I had with Kommie, there is a significant difference between chewable aspirin and regular old aspirin that could change the course of a heart attack. Make sure you're keeping the chewable stuff in your kit. You might also want to note on the bottle the correct number of pills for a heart attack based on the pill dosage.

I've been carrying the regular dosage coated stuff in my travel and daily first aid kits but will be upgrading to the chewable low dose stuff asap.

Yeah, a lot of aspirin tabes are enterically coated so they do not begin to dissolve until they have left your stomach and are in your bowels. This is good for reducing the odds of getting peptic ulcer disease, but bad for providing immediate anti-platelet action that you want in someone with a heart attack. Carry the chewable baby kind, individual bottles are hella cheap. I write the dose (4 tabs) on the lid of each bottle I own for emergency use so that I have less to think about if/when I need to use them.

edit: I added this to my first post as well:

One last point:

Doc_Awesome posted:


-Hemostatic Agents: Quikclot used to come in a powder form that was poured into the wound and reacted to liquid causing a thermal reaction that would cauterize the wound which was painful to use and would also burn your eyes if the wind blew it into them while trying to treat a wound. The formula was changed to one that does not produce a chemical burn but is still effective. The active ingredient is kaolin. Celox is another alternative but uses chitosan, which is derived from shellfish and may cause issues with those allergic to shellfish. Both are widely available in an impregnated gauze form as mentioned above or as stand alone material you pour into a wound.


Hemostatic powders cause burns because they work via an exothermic reaction. Does not really help cauterize the wound, just burns the poo poo outta your patient.

You want to use hemostatic agent impregnated bandages and not the powder. These agents are not strong enough to tamponade life-threatening bleeds on their own, so there really is no point to using the powder.

FWIW, the evidence for the use of hemostatic agents is kinda weak too (see p.173 of this pdf). I have regular bandages in all of my trauma kits. Hemostatic dressings won't hurt, just not worth the expense to me personally. YMMV.

Kommienzuspadt fucked around with this message at 17:25 on Sep 10, 2019

thr33n0r
Nov 18, 2006
www.theowla.com

Hemostatics are trendy and tactisexual but good old pressure, wound packing and tourniquets are best practices.

Dr. Gojo Shioji
Apr 22, 2004



Does anyone have experience or opinions about Esstac triple mag versus 3+3 mag carriers? I like the idea of the 3+3, but it seems like in actuality the pistol mags would just add way too much girth to your chest and you'd bump/catch them on things constantly.

BrianM87
Oct 30, 2006
I keep missing. Are you sure the bullets work?

Dr. Gojo Shioji posted:

Does anyone have experience or opinions about Esstac triple mag versus 3+3 mag carriers? I like the idea of the 3+3, but it seems like in actuality the pistol mags would just add way too much girth to your chest and you'd bump/catch them on things constantly.

I've never personally used Esstac pouches, but my previous carrier was 2x2 for rifle and pistol mags. I didn't care for having the pistol mags on the carrier for a couple reasons:

The vast majority of my training and situations of actually using my pistol had me drawing magazines from the belt. I did train to pull them from the carrier and didn't have a problem doing so,but I just preferred keeping the magazines separate, and if I needed extra magazines I had double paddle pouch that I would throw on my belt and just shift everything else back. The other reason is as you suggested, it sticks out farther than I wanted. My department mandated single point slings. I can't speak for anyone else in the department because as far as I know no one else had this problem, but my rifle sling would constantly get stuck on the left side pistol magazine, several times actually pulling it out of the pouch while maneuvering the rifle.

infrared35
Jan 12, 2005

border patrol qt


Plaster Town Cop

Ooh, I love this thread already. None of my coworkers want to hear about all the crap I carry, so I get to bore all y'all.

I currently have two main duty belts - a nice leather one with less stuff on it for recruiting events and such, and an "enforcement" nylon belt that carries my real working gear. Going across my "enforcement" duty belt as it currently sits, from left to right:

Cobra buckle, placed in back. I know that makes me weird, but that gives me more room up front to put gear. I hate having stuff on my back, especially if I'm going to be in a vehicle all day.
Blackhawk pistol lanyard. A relatively new addition; but cheap insurance with the number of vessel boardings I do. I've been on boardings where officers have lost mags, flashlights, phones, and tablets overboard.
Benchmade Nimravus. Everyone calls me Rambo because of it, but every time I work a cargo operation I wish I had a bigger knife. This one has been great, but I may take it back a notch and run my ESEE 3 because it seems a little sturdier.
ASP baton. 26" steel. We can carry the 26, 21, or 16, and in steel or aluminum. It's heavy, but I want something I can use a tourniquet windlass in a pinch.
HK P2000 w/TLR-1 HL. Also rocking a Taylor Freelance mag extension which gives me 17 rounds on tap, same as when I carried a Glock 17.
Centrifuge Training TQ holder, which attaches to the front of my Safariland holster. Handy place for a quick TQ to throw at someone if you're passing by.
Keys. Everyone has keys.
PRD. Personal radiation detector. Handy little thing.
OC spray. 2-ounce Vexor. Stuff is evil.
Mags. Three 13-round P30 mags that work in the P2000.
Flashlight. I hate to say it but I don't remember what model it is for sure. It's a really bright Streamlight that uses a pair of 123 batteries.
Cuffs. Standard chain-link.
NAR Maritime trauma kit. I have a smaller kit on my vest, but I've been working a lot of cargo lately and getting up in the back of semi-trucks can be tricky while wearing a big-rear end vest covered in pouches. I have the drop-leg med kit so I can ditch the vest and still have stuff on me.
Gloves. Three pairs of nitrile gloves, ranger-rolled.
Radio. Probably the heaviest single item on my belt.

Only registered members can see post attachments!

BrianM87
Oct 30, 2006
I keep missing. Are you sure the bullets work?

I'm so torn between leather and nylon belts. The nylon was definitely lighter, but for some reason I felt like the leather belts were just more comfortable to me. Here's a picture of me arresting someone after a wonderful little foot pursuit through rising flood waters. Where's my backup? Why they're the one taking the picture of course. Jerks were afraid of getting a little wet.

infrared35
Jan 12, 2005

border patrol qt


Plaster Town Cop

Side note on the medical stuff, before I go in depth on my own personal gear:

In my 20 years on the job, I haven't seen a ton of medicals. Saw a couple car crashes before I really had any serious medical training, and did what I could. I've seen a handful of slash wounds, mostly from people working on broken equipment without wearing work gloves. I've seen a couple strokes, a handful of seizures (several real and one fake), and a couple heart attacks. Lots of little cuts, bruises, sprains, and broken ribs. One minor accidental LSD injection while handling broken glass.

But I did attend a firearms class where, during the previous class, a dude shot himself through the hand on an adjacent shooting bay and wandered over to the class's bay to see if anyone knew first aid. Luckily everyone did, and the instructor always has a medical plan in place and plenty of supplies.



BrianM87 posted:

Where's my backup? Why they're the one taking the picture of course. Jerks were afraid of getting a little wet.

Our coworkers are our worst enemies sometimes. The city had a pursuit that ended right at the toll booths adjacent to my office. In case the vehicle decided to take off again, as it had several times during the pursuit, I ran out there with a stop stick because I know the city doesn't have them. Instead of coming out to help, my coworkers just watched from the office and heckled me on the radio.



Edit: Side note on the sideways mags: some officers prefer to carry their mags mounted sideways on the belt. It's a pretty natural motion to draw them that way, and they do take up less vertical space on the belt if you have a bit of a stomach overhang.

infrared35 fucked around with this message at 21:25 on Sep 18, 2019

Zhanism
Apr 1, 2005
Death by Zhanism. So Judged.

Perfect place for this question. Many chest rigs come with cummerbund as an option. I cant seem to see in the pictures which part the cummerbund is and what its for. Please excuse if this is dumb question. Thanks.

infrared35
Jan 12, 2005

border patrol qt


Plaster Town Cop

Zhanism posted:

Perfect place for this question. Many chest rigs come with cummerbund as an option. I cant seem to see in the pictures which part the cummerbund is and what its for. Please excuse if this is dumb question. Thanks.

It's just a strap; in most of the rigs I've worn, you have a big front piece and a big back piece, usually with adjustable shoulder straps and then straps on each side to secure the halves together. The cumerbund is typically mounted on the rear half of the armor and wraps around and fastens over your stomach to keep the back half of the armor more snug on your body. And if the back half is snug, the front half will be snug too, if your other straps are adjusted properly.

infrared35 fucked around with this message at 18:40 on Sep 21, 2019

infrared35
Jan 12, 2005

border patrol qt


Plaster Town Cop

Hereís my everyday vest. Starting at left:

- A mag pouch that I use to hold a UV flashlight for checking documents.
- A handcuff case that I use to hold a small camera for taking evidence photos or pictures of team activities or operations for the agency newsletter. Tucked behind it is a pair of Tuff Tie flex cuff things.
- A trauma kit with the usual stuff.
- An upholstery tool for prying things open.
- Taser Taser Taser

Zhanism
Apr 1, 2005
Death by Zhanism. So Judged.

infrared35 posted:

It's just a strap; in most of the rigs I've worn, you have a big front piece and a big back piece, usually with adjustable shoulder straps and then straps on each side to secure the halves together. The cumerbund is typically mounted on the rear half of the armor and wraps around and fastens over your stomach to keep the back half ot the armor more snug on your body. And if the back half is snug, the front half will be snug too, if your other straps are adjusted properly.

Ahh that makes sense on why I couldnt really tell what or where it was for. Thanks.

infrared35
Jan 12, 2005

border patrol qt


Plaster Town Cop

Zhanism posted:

Ahh that makes sense on why I couldnt really tell what or where it was for. Thanks.

infrared35
Jan 12, 2005

border patrol qt


Plaster Town Cop

My work rifle: military surplus Colt M4A1, Aimpoint CompM4, UTG (yeah) extended handguard, Magpul hand stop, B5 stock, Centrifuge Training sling, Streamlight ProTac HL-X, and Troy BUIS.

Rifle plates: just a med kit and an M4 mag.

DEAD GAY FORUM
Dec 18, 2018

the good posts were inside you all along


infrared35 posted:

My work rifle: military surplus Colt M4A1, Aimpoint CompM4, UTG (yeah) extended handguard, Magpul hand stop, B5 stock, Centrifuge Training sling, Streamlight ProTac HL-X, and Troy BUIS.

Rifle plates: just a med kit and an M4 mag.



Aren't you on the blue side of CBP? It's neat you get stuff like this for work.

infrared35
Jan 12, 2005

border patrol qt


Plaster Town Cop

DEAD GAY FORUM posted:

Aren't you on the blue side of CBP? It's neat you get stuff like this for work.

Yeah, Iím at a land border, and on the Anti-Terrorism Contraband Enforcement Team, which means we get more gear to play with than most folks.

DEAD GAY FORUM
Dec 18, 2018

the good posts were inside you all along


I shoot steel with a group of dudes in the BORTAC down here in TX. Those guys must have a black budget because they show up fully kitted out like green berets.

They don't even bring their own ammo. They shoot BP ammo. Must be nice

beanieson
Sep 25, 2008

I had the opportunity to change literally anything about the world and I used it to get a new av


Surplus M16A2 Commando


Older trijicon on there with a magpul handguard, vfg & TLR-1 HL

beanieson fucked around with this message at 19:20 on Sep 21, 2019

DeesGrandpa
Oct 21, 2009



beanieson posted:

Surplus M16A2 Commando


Older trijicon on there with a magpul handguard, vfg & TLR-1 HL

An A2 without a fixed handle is a sad A2

goosenecks forever

beanieson
Sep 25, 2008

I had the opportunity to change literally anything about the world and I used it to get a new av


Ugh I can assure you sir that A2 is quite pleased with itself

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infrared35
Jan 12, 2005

border patrol qt


Plaster Town Cop

DEAD GAY FORUM posted:

I shoot steel with a group of dudes in the BORTAC down here in TX. Those guys must have a black budget because they show up fully kitted out like green berets.

They don't even bring their own ammo. They shoot BP ammo. Must be nice

Oh yeah. BORTAC and BORSTAR are legit.

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