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EthanSteele
Nov 18, 2007

I can hear you


Serf posted:

ah yes, the famous concept of a communist monarchy

Communists are famously very fond of Czars.

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EthanSteele
Nov 18, 2007

I can hear you


hyphz posted:

You also get a free +1 to the healing roll if your medkit is connected to the Internet, because apparently by this point in the future Google is an intrinsic part of the medicine process.

This makes sense cos it's just connected to the sum of all medical knowledge NeoWebMD or whatever. Its good!

EthanSteele
Nov 18, 2007

I can hear you


PurpleXVI posted:

"Google! My leg hurts! There's bone poking through the skin! Is it broken?"

"Oh no, it's cancer. Now commencing radiation therapy."

Nailed it, that's exactly why its only a +1

EthanSteele
Nov 18, 2007

I can hear you


Halloween Jack posted:

Yeah, the illustrations for the pregens in 2e and 3e were great, the problem was that the actual statblocks were badly-built or broke the rules. I suppose they were made in the middle of the design process and never fixed. The Weapons Specialist was in 3rd edition and was my favourite illustration.



Shadowrun liked to pretend that "extremely skilled with little or no cyberware" was equivalent to "mediocre skills and cybered to the gills." It's not.

Yeah! That illustration is rad and there's always at least one character inspired by it in every Shadowrun game I've played. Give up one of those weapon skills (probably projectile weapons) to lower skills and up the resources for wired reflexes instead and she's real good.

EthanSteele
Nov 18, 2007

I can hear you


Dawgstar posted:

We found this out the hard way when my group made characters based mostly off the pregens. Like, for the Face it didn't matter. At combat she was competent enough with some skill with pistols and hand-to-hand and that was fine, she was there to make sure it didn't come to combat. The Shaman had magic. Decker, Rigger, their skill sets. The Weapon Specialist, though? It's kind of demoralizing to be the one who can use any lethal weapon ever and watching the Street Samurai carve things up before you can even act because Wired Reflexes.

Not terribly along into the campaign one of the run rewards was either nuyen or a much larger store credit in cyberware. They took the hint and got wired and all was well. (Well, as well as 3E got but we made it work.)

How did they carve things up before you could even act? In SR3 they still have the same options as you per pass and only act once per pass, they just get extras afterwards. The only to get more sets of actions per pass is Move-by-Wire cyberware which has a whole host of drawbacks, is mondo expensive and none of the pregens have because it was introduced in a later book. The way it shakes out in the game I'm in is most things are dealt with by everyone's second pass and then the third pass guy has nothing to do.

In the SR3 game I'm in now we have a rotating cast of 14 characters, only 5 have Wired Reflexes 2 (or magic equivalent) and any time they get a third pass its always pretty perfunctory.


Zereth posted:

the lovely budget knockoff of wired reflexes no PC should ever take".

Once you realise that every initiative score between 11-20 and 21-30 are the same 99% of the time because 99% of the enemies you'll face will only get one pass, a low two if they get lucky, while you hitting a guaranteed two passes every time means you've already won and that its trivially easy to get a guaranteed two passes suddenly nobody needs Wired 3 anymore and you can get other stuff. Everyone has access to some initiative boosting thing that can, for very little investment, get them an average of 16-19 on the deck meaning they will always go before all but the massive outlier strongest opposition.

EthanSteele
Nov 18, 2007

I can hear you


Dawgstar posted:

Mostly it boiled down to the Weapons Specialist only going the same amount of times as somebody playing a support role. How it worked in my experience is everybody'd get their pass and then the Street Samurai would go two more times because the WS had to roll high to get two passes because, whoops, no initiative boosting. They're only rolling, what, 6+1D6 and hoping for an 11 to go again?* And that's not even considering stuff like the spell-lobber just flinging down an AOE spell and calling it a day (which is a Shadowrun problem in general). The crux of the problem - 'highly skilled is the same worth as lots of cyberware or spells or any other niche' - is that it just doesn't apply to combat characters. The player wanted to contribute via combat and did not feel they were really doing so.

*My player didn't buy the Booster Reflexes, buying - surprise - more weapons and such because he thought that was the pregen's deal which in theory it is.

Yeeaaaah, taking stuff off a pregen is a recipe for disaster in any game, that one doesn't feel like it's exclusive to Shadowrun. It does allow you to be bad at it, which is certainly one of its problems, but you can dump str, dex and con on a fighter in D&D too. It could be clearer that multiple passes is how you be good at combat I guess, but every combat based pregen except the ganger (who is melee) has some manner of improved initiative so, for SR3 at least, it doesn't try and say 'highly skilled is the same worth as lots of cyberware or spells or any other niche' for combat, the highly skilled one still has the minimum of cyberware it needs to be proficient at combat. As is its 2d6+7 for initiative, which is two passes on anything higher than a 3 on 2d6 so, ~92% of the time and then the street sam is only getting one more pass on average, instead of two which is much nicer for both parties. The WS could certainly be better, but as is works perfectly fine in a regular game.

EthanSteele
Nov 18, 2007

I can hear you


Halloween Jack posted:

You are correct, but you'd be surprised how many people houseruled 3e so that wired reflexes worked like in 2e. I remember people complaining about it on Dumpshock. Bad design can be addictive.

I've seen a lot of people read a rule and there be two ways for it work and they go with the one that completely breaks the game, but that's wild even for that sort of thing.

EthanSteele
Nov 18, 2007

I can hear you


hyphz posted:

"Soft targets inflict the target's Body/4 rounded up damage back on the vehicle", so ramming a troll with a sports car can leave the car off worse.

This is the way it should be, hitting a troll with a lovely little hatchback should annihilate the hatchback. The troll should get jacked up too, but the car should be a wreck.


PurpleXVI posted:

Next: A loving 20-page "example of play," what the hell, that's a small campaign.

One of the biggest criticisms of Moran's games is that it's really hard to figure out how to actually play them, so having a thing that covers a whole session is super useful. The individual systems aren't usually very complicated, but figuring out how to put them together and get a session out of it, especially with the wild narrative power that players have in her games, can be difficult. I'm looking forward to seeing it.

EthanSteele
Nov 18, 2007

I can hear you


Cooked Auto posted:

Invisibility has always been the most broken spell in SR because it's an effective encounter or problem skipper unless the GM goes to extreme lengths to negate it.
The lead designer for SR has a massive boner for what is essentially Magicrun.

Pretty sure PhysAdepts were a borderline must take in 5 as well. In the campaign I played the power gamer of the group always tended to go for them regardless of concept otherwise.

Invisibility is rad because spells only need line of sight so you can make a wall invisible and laugh.

In my experience PhysAdepts vs Not That always come down to how good is cyber vs not having cyber and how often you are going to be doing something that isn't your main deal. Theoretically having to give up something for the magic priority is also a thing but also no one is falling for that old chestnut and it turns out being hyper-specialised in the game that has always rewarded and incentivised hyper-specialising is really good.

EthanSteele fucked around with this message at 23:04 on Oct 16, 2019

EthanSteele
Nov 18, 2007

I can hear you


Ratoslov posted:

And every iteration of the build-a-gun rules. Those things are completely cursed.

I go to bat for SR3 a lot, but even I can't on this one. The build-a-gun rules either get you a gun that's the same as something that exists for double the price, or you completely gently caress everything up and the advice for the GM on availability/street index stuff is "just make it up yourself" and only one of the options (the bullet-hose one) is really obvious whether that should be available at chargen or not. Going in with an eye for "ok, what's a gun that doesn't exist, but would make sense" like a super concealable shotgun that's for Tir na nOg special forces or something instead of just the most broken thing you can make can help, but its still garbo.

Balance wise for SR (and a bunch of games actually) a lot of the time "balance" is that baseline competence is a low bar to clear and that being the Absolute Best at a thing doesn't change much for general performance. You can only kill a guy so much before it's overkill that you rolled 12 die instead of 6. That doesn't mean there's no point in having the bigger pool and being an Adept, it just means that when it comes to the standard shootman scenario, you're both killing a guy. The Adept shines in the trickshot, long distance, low-visibility scenario and you just bulldoze it through sheer number of die being rolled while the other guy is still putting on his tactical goggles (new from Renraku) before he can even approach the task. Obviously its different for each edition and even systems within each edition.

Never gonna try and defend SR editing though, I only have experience with SR3 and 5, but both of them have some real nightmare passages for figuring out stuff. Core stuff in SR3 is fine, Fight, Sneak and Magic are easy enough to understand, but once Adjusted Barrier Rating gets in there I'm out. SR5.... well when the rules that are referenced exist its not so bad, unfortunately that appears to be a big hurdle.

EthanSteele
Nov 18, 2007

I can hear you


Omnicrom posted:

I will accept gun customization only if you can go full Resonance of Fate.



I previously presented this evidence to my GM as to why only allowing one add-on at each point was ridiculous but he didn't fall for it.

EthanSteele
Nov 18, 2007

I can hear you


I'd like to give them the benefit of the doubt on the magic healing circle thing, but. There's everything else.

EthanSteele
Nov 18, 2007

I can hear you


Omnicrom posted:

Explaining Murderhoboing is always kind of a tricky sell, but it's easier in a fantasy setting where the assumption is that there's lots of unexplored/untamed locations with monsters and we need to occasionally point people with swords in that direction. It works far less effectively as an explanation in Shadowrun's near-future Urban Science Fantasy Cyberpunk setting.

The answer to explaining murderhoboing is..uh.. don't? As in "don't murderhobo" but for some reason people decide that the Sneaky Espionage game where best case scenario is you sneak into a place or talk your way by some guards and do sick hacking tricks so that nobody has ever known anyone was there is the one to get an SMG and then just shoot everyone you see with APDS rounds.

EthanSteele
Nov 18, 2007

I can hear you


wiegieman posted:

The reason you're a Shadowrunner should be part of your character's backstory. All runners are tough, established experts, so how did your character get their skills and why aren't they working for a government or getting paid a ton of money by a corp? Usually it's because they have serious issues preventing it, but it's up to you.


Cythereal posted:

That's my feeling after having played Dragonfall. If you could be a productive member of society, you wouldn't be a Shadowrunner.

Yup! Just like Torchbearer says, you wouldn't be a protagonist if you could be a productive member of society. My group was talking about this today after the session, that one of the valid end points for a Shadowrunner is a corp recognizing your skills, deciding you're worth whatever problems you've got and going "yeah, we'll hire you on retainer and give you a pension" and being an official Aztechnology Problem Solver (Assassin) or something.

EthanSteele
Nov 18, 2007

I can hear you


Ronwayne posted:

Re: Shadowrunners being shadowrunners due to an inherit deficit, I strongly disagree. Pretty much all my PCs do not work for a corp because they don't want to. And the GM forcing you to sucks and I wouldn't play with one that enforced that fluff conceit. "The problems inherent in shadowrunning, up to and including horrible death and things worse than death, are still preferable to work-a-day-life under any possible corp context."

I'd say that "not wanting to work for a corp" counts as an issue that prevents you from working for a corp? No one said it was a deficit that prevented that avenue.

EthanSteele
Nov 18, 2007

I can hear you


Halloween Jack posted:

One of the things that genuinely is difficult to reconcile is how shadowrunning works with the modern omnipresent surveillance state. I tend to handwave it with the following rationale: You're living in an era presided over by the ghosts of Reagan and Thatcher, where the concept of society has been basically eliminated and governments are in full retreat in the face of corporate power. As a consequence, sharing information between corporate enclaves, government agencies, and the other corporations they contract to actually do things is a total nightmare. So getting caught on camera breaking into a Shiawase plant is not likely to impact you until the next time you mess with Shiawase.

Yep! The golden rule of Shadowrun is "Shadowrunners exist" so anything that would go against that doesn't exist, and corps instantly cracking down on every runner that goes against them in any capacity and sharing info between each other is a thing that would definitely go against that. Like, the canon reason a big search engine like google doesn't exist is because the corps won't share information with each other.

EthanSteele
Nov 18, 2007

I can hear you


It's a Boy and his Dog sorta thing. If I recall correctly the guy who made it has said he wanted sex to be a thing in a game because he always feels a bit weird about it and this was a way of making it happen. That the Battlebabe's sex move is "do not trigger any sex moves" so she's the only one that can have completely uncomplicated sex with someone and then just leave because she's Cool and Distant Like That is always a fave.

EthanSteele
Nov 18, 2007

I can hear you


Monsterhearts is absolutely not a game for everyone and not every group can even think about playing it, but it's really, really good.

edit: the Mortal is absolutely the greatest monster, hands down

EthanSteele
Nov 18, 2007

I can hear you


I mean. Nerds do think Gamers are Good and Girls are Bad.

EthanSteele
Nov 18, 2007

I can hear you


Joe Slowboat posted:

But can you discretely divide the entirety of high school social life into Girls and Gamers and donít answer that because Iím pretty sure some nerds would with like an argument about jocks not counting idk

I don't think it says anywhere that the groups have to be huge or widely applicable, but you can boil it down to "Us and Them" very easily. It could be you gatekeep one particular school club and your darkest self is definitely you going "no I'm a jock I can't be in the chess club I'm awful don't talk to me". Based on the origins options being "wrong side of the tracks" stuff I think the intention is to be bigger than Nerd Gatekeeper like you say, but I think its a valid read of the thing.

Speaking of darkest self, I like that the darkest self is you feeling you don't belong in the Good Group rather than having to compulsively gatekeep every gate you see which is the direction of some darkest selves. That type makes it difficult sometimes to tell when a particular character is even in that mode, Adam Koebel's group raised it every time it happened with the witch in their game, she was always maximum vengeance shithead hex mode so it was tough to see what changed.


Carados posted:

Speaking of Riverdale, I've been kind of interested in running a Monsterhearts campaign with that tone. The characters aren't monsters, more metaphorical monsters. The reality it takes place is super grounded, and any supernatural elements required can be explained with either narrative convience or some technology.

Not that itd ever happen, just a weird idea that I keep having.

That's one of the first things you have to talk about when setting up a game, how real are the monsters? Does everybody know they're real? Are the various monsters aware of each other, eg: Do Werewolves know Vampires are exist? Or is it a case where the vampire stuff is just symbolism that makes twitter mad?

The games I've been in have done it as the Monsters are treated as Definitely Real, except for when that would destroy the game, or at least move it in a direction no one is interested in playing out. Werewolf flips their poo poo in the corridors between class so the entire school sees and the game would become about hunting down a literal werewolf now? Nope, just a kid lashing out at someone in a way that's going to get parents involved. That the parents are proud of their child for showing Alpha traits (its lovely teen drama tv, the wolves are definitely big on Alphas etc) because they're For Real Werewolves too causes concerns, but no one's melting down the silverware. You can definitely do a game where that would be the case, but everyone has to be on board, if you signed up for High School Drama with a Dracula you might not be into it turning into a game about being helping a literal murderer on the run from law or whatever instead.

EthanSteele
Nov 18, 2007

I can hear you


Mors Rattus posted:

Werewolf packs having alphas just means the werewolf pack leaders don't know poo poo about wolf family dynamics.

Which, like, why would they, they're werewolves, not wolves. If they want to organize their pack structure based on a society developed by, essentially, a wolf prison gang, that's their business.

Exactly! Just awful.

EthanSteele
Nov 18, 2007

I can hear you


No. 1 Apartheid Fan posted:

Obviously mixing hobbies up with therapy is dangerous, but I think games like that could legit be helpful to people averse to thinking about their childhoods/teen years in some way. It's a weird thing to suggest, but then, even one of the best WoD games (Changeling: The Lost) is a pretty direct metaphor for abuse trauma.

It's not weird at all to consider and think about the media you consume as helpful to you and your understanding of yourself, it's media 101. Yeah, as therapy no, but just as a thing that makes you consider your experiences? Not weird at all.

Like, the movie Annihilation is only powerful and as good as it is to some people because it gets you to think about certain topics and that same thing makes it almost impossible to recommend because you can't really open up with "hey, this movie is good, it made me think about how my grandpa died and I cried for 2 hours afterwards" because that's such a personal experience.

EthanSteele
Nov 18, 2007

I can hear you


megane posted:

not to mention limiting the amount of stupid "I can choreograph a ballet with Cutting, right" arguments. Maybe you can't do that and still have a game where characters feel like gods, I dunno. I just don't want to play that game.

All the other ones seem pretty reasonable to pull off and describe how it works, but this one? I think it highlights the limitations of the power, you can solve problems when removing things or splitting things very easily, but adding things is impossible. Going "I cut the lack of choreography" definitely gets the "how?" question and if the player can't say how it works then it doesn't work.

If this was Demon and you had the multilingual pun power you would obviously be able to go "I'm the best dancer in the world because I can cut a rug" which is the good poo poo.

EthanSteele
Nov 18, 2007

I can hear you


SirPhoebos posted:

Didn't you already post Cerberus? I could of sworn we had a discussion on whether it represented nerd gatekeeping.

It was just mentioned when additional official skins came up.

EthanSteele
Nov 18, 2007

I can hear you


Mors Rattus posted:

Yes. Once a Passion gets high enough you generally have to start making rolls to not just do the thing the Passion wants. But having them high is what gets you delicious roll bonuses and even massive buffs for being Chivalrous or Religious.

Had a knight with the Friendship passion at 22 and Loyalty to the Knights of the Appleblossom (the PC crew) 35 and that makes it so you basically auto crit anything you do in service of those passions but also when one of your friends and members of the crew dies you get age shock from both and lose 3 points of dex, 2 points of size and 1 appearance. Pendragon is good.

EthanSteele
Nov 18, 2007

I can hear you


Night10194 posted:

No, I remember that bit. Similarly, Wood Elves got a +1 to Str, which meant they could have a 19 str and bypass the entire Exceptional Strength subsystem in 2e. The buffest of all elfs.

It's pointed out multiple times in LotR that Legolas is loving jacked so it would make sense that derivative/homage stuff would also have wood elves be the buffest ones.

EthanSteele
Nov 18, 2007

I can hear you


Burning Wheel uses similar systems for In-depth Social Stuff (Duel of Wits) and In-depth Sword Time (Fight!) as well as one roll and opposed roll versions of both. When played properly doing the argument as the character would and being relatively strict about what Persuasion can do versus saying that no, the argument you just worded was definitely Rhetoric so people don't just do Point Point Point with Persuasion every volley (which is easily countered) it really shines. The character with the better skills will usually win, but it's extremely rare to get a full blowout so that one side gets absolutely nothing from the exchange.

EthanSteele
Nov 18, 2007

I can hear you


jakodee posted:

As mentioned, I think Burning Wheel does this.

It even does wider social conflict stuff! Duel of Wits can be used to represent a single debate or be stretched out to be a political campaign where each volley is your approach for an entire month's campaigning. You do Point with Persuasion to put up nice posters of how you're going to make everything better, next month though you do a Rebuttal using Rhetoric so make sure everyone knows your opponent is lying and to set everybody straight on the facts. It's rad.

EthanSteele
Nov 18, 2007

I can hear you


Is AD&D the one where you aren't supposed to fight every encounter? I know in one of the old D&Ds you only care about the spoils and if you could sneak past a bunch of orcs or convince some goblins to hang out with you or whatever then that's pretty much an encounter gone perfectly. A wizard with two sleeps and an acid arrow makes more sense when those two sleeps are get out of jail free cards for when you gently caress up your sneaking or talking because 8 encounters isn't 8 combat encounters unless something went wrong every single time.

EthanSteele
Nov 18, 2007

I can hear you


PurpleXVI posted:

Technically? Yes.

Practically? The only character with any system for avoiding combat is the thief, there's no actual stealth or hiding skill for anyone else, so when a 2d6 Wraiths show up as a world map random encounter, you're reliant on GM fiat if he says you're allowed to hide from them or go in a large circle around them

In one of the older editions afaik stealth and hiding worked by you just saying that you're hiding and if it makes sense you're hiding. The Thief's skills were for when it doesn't make sense. Like "I hide in the dark behind this rock" anyone can do, but "I sneak down well-lit corridor in view of the guards" is Thief time, which is also why the weird percentage is so low. There's no Spot Hidden thing either if I recall because you just say you're searching the wall and the GM says if you find the thing or not. Early D&D wasn't super crunchy and left a lot to the GM to make calls based on the personalities of the creatures and what the players could do based on what makes sense, like using the ladder you brought to cross a gap.


PurpleXVI posted:

Actually! In the earlier incarnations of D&D, collecting loot was far more profitable, XP-wise, than killing monsters, in most cases. So you really wanted to not engage most enemies and even better yet, just get the loot without the killing, because the loot was itself worth a considerable amount of XP based on its value.

Yeah, this is the thing I was talking about, gold value = XP stuff.

EthanSteele
Nov 18, 2007

I can hear you


I've seen it as gender-neutral for specifically the knightly title of "Sir" in a couple of places.


PurpleXVI posted:

My personal policy is that players can make their intellectual or social rolls as long as they put in a bit of effort. Like, you can't just go: "I roll Cha(or appropriate stat/skill) to make the guard let me through." but you can absolutely go: "I try to convince the guard that this box full of poisonous snakes is a special delivery for the evil vizier, can I roll Cha(or appropriate stat/skill) for that?" Though generally I tend to go relatively light on the rolls as a GM, I only call them if it's something where I'm not sure. Like an 18 Str D&D character wanting to push through a rotten door doesn't need a check for it, it goes down. A guy who comes up with a very believable argument that an NPC would be prone to believing doesn't need to roll for it, the guy lets him through.

"I try to convince the guard the guard to let me through, I do it by X" with X being intimidating, being pals, pretending to be there for legitimate reasons etc is as legit as "I attack the goblin with my sword" to me, ie: you can do it every now and then because coming up with stuff on the fly is hard sometimes and you shouldn't be penalised for playing the talky guy because you can't think of anything to say when the sword guy doesn't get penalised for not knowing how to sword irl, but doing it every time is boring as hell and if you're having that much trouble coming up with stuff we should probably just do something else tonight.

I would still ask for a roll for your example of a believable argument because if the guy who dumped charisma comes up with it he's just getting to ignore the fact that he dumped charisma and it's kinda like cheating. If they fail the roll then its not that what they said doesn't make sense, it's that what they said doesn't sound legit from them or whatever. Maybe your character just sounds really sarcastic or something. Same for any other skill, if the character would know and you don't, that's fine, roll away and we'll see. If you know a thing and your character wouldn't then I'm not going to let you cheat, you need to roll. Or if another character would have that information they can be the one to know, but your 7 int 7 charisma fighter doesn't get to be the smooth talking genius any more than the 0 survival skill wizard gets to know how to get drinkable water out in the woods. Roll and we'll see if it goes down how you want.

EthanSteele
Nov 18, 2007

I can hear you


d66 is one die is tens so its 11-16, 21-26, 31-36 and so on. It's a thing from when the only dice you could reasonably expect anyone to own was d6.

EthanSteele
Nov 18, 2007

I can hear you


JcDent posted:

Now, since I'm taking some saber classes, I can say that there's more to fighting mano-a-mano(or a-orco) than just the hit/no hit binary. Feinting, taunting, countering... even getting tired!

Burning Wheel. It even has those things (except getting tired) in the social combat! It's good!

EthanSteele
Nov 18, 2007

I can hear you


Nessus posted:

What I never understood about these guys is: I can comprehend wishing the literary scene was more to your taste, but why does science fiction, writ large, need to stabilize and reinforce... anything at all?? It's speculative fiction, fa chrissakes.

Control. That's pretty much it. If people read about a thing they will think about the thing and they might come to the "wrong" conclusion as far as these bozos are concerned.

EthanSteele
Nov 18, 2007

I can hear you


The title of "Prince" is a derivative of Princeps. Exalted and the fiction it draws from uses it in that context.

EthanSteele
Nov 18, 2007

I can hear you


PurpleXVI posted:

VOTOMs goes a long way, but apparently past the second arc or so, which I admit is where I stopped watching, Chirico turns out to have magic powers or some such poo poo? Going entirely by word of mouth here, mind you, but yes, VOTOMs is probably the realest robotest show I can name and those two first arcs are loving great.

Gundam is uhhhh... hahahahah. Okay so the problem with Gundam is that it tries so hard to be semi-realistic but the authors can never stop themselves bringing in superweapons and fated ultrapilots that don't need tactics because they just use their soul magic or cyborg implants or psionics or whatever and then they win the fight. I think genuinely the only moment I enjoyed in a Gundam show was the end of the first season of 00 where a bunch of military veterans used tactics and coordination to gently caress up a bunch of idiot super-robots piloted by genetically-engineered ultrapilots(And then of course some even more super super pilots showed up and won the day for them anyway). Take my critique with a grain of salt in the sense that I haven't watched any of the newer Gundam stuff nor the very oldest, so if like, Iron Blooded Children or whatever it's called is a huge step up in quality from [checks] Gundam SEED, ha ha, what wouldn't be, then that's cool and good.

08th MS was also pretty good for the first half, which as far as I know fits pretty well with when the main writer or something committed suicide, which is the story related to me for how the show suddenly seems to jump off the rails and change tone.

People here are using "Gundam" to talk about the original Mobile Suit Gundam series or the more extended Amuro/Char story of MSG, Zeta and CCA, which is absolutely not like the rest of the franchise and absolutely not like SEED where that is 100% the deal while otherwise being a retelling of the original MSG story and it is much worse for it.

Original Gundam starts with the robot being basically invincible to what it fights against, with a super powerful weapon that if it hits you then you're done, but it absolutely doesn't fit the deal that other shows with that setup have and by the halfway point it's busted and worn out and what wins the war isn't the robot and the special boy being the best (though he does get very good by the end), its the antagonist reaction to it and the fact the Earth has a manufacturing base 100 times greater than the space boys and can pump out hundreds of Good Enough robots that can be piloted by basically anybody compared to the Space Nazi/Imperial Japan concentrating on super weapons and picking pilots based on how good their Sieg Zeon is.

EthanSteele
Nov 18, 2007

I can hear you


Midjack posted:

At least one of Battle Century G devs posted on this board at one point though I don't remember their username.

We also have a Gundam thread for deep dives into that franchise as well as a general mecha thread.

BCG is alright, I ran a full campaign for it and while there were some hiccups, it's not bad. It suffers from the thing that plagues a lot of mech games in that it tries to cover Literally All Types of Mecha at once and how to square Pilot and Mech stuff also its an Effect Based game which people tend to either love or hate. The author has put out a retrospective errata thing where he went over all the things and what he wanted to do with each bit and how it worked or didn't and how he would do it now with more experience and play data available.

Lancer is a very good game, partly because it doesn't fall for the trick other mech games do where they try and square Pilot and Mech stuff and end up having two separate character sheets by going "its a mech game, here are the few details you need for a pilot, but all the crunchy game parts are in the tactical mech fighting bit"

EthanSteele
Nov 18, 2007

I can hear you


Fivemarks posted:

That's the rub though. You can either make both the pilot and the mech important, or you can make the pilot not important at all and only have the mech have stats. I don't like only the mech having Stats.

I agree, one thing that pretty much every piece of mech media has in common is that the pilot is the important part. From Mazinger to Gundam, it's the human element always matters.

Making both pilot and mech important is easier said than done though, or at least to make it feel good and not just end up being two games smashed together, one for pilot scale stuff and one for mech stuff.

EthanSteele
Nov 18, 2007

I can hear you


kommy5 posted:

That monetary system sounds awful. A liquid currency creates all sorts of nightmares. I mean, just imagine what happens if you drop a handful of change. Your coins might bounce a little, but you can go pick them up. Drop your liquid life water and it's gone unless it's a water proof surface. Save maybe you have a nice flower growing there to commemorate your losing your lunch money. And then there's the manner of keeping it clean and pure enough. And then there's the special nightmare of storing large volumes of it... Water is *heavy* and awkward to store. And using a fairly complex device to measure out change is a pain. Do you just keep a pipette on your belt beside your 'sphere' of magic water? What if the sphere has ten 'drops' removed? How does a seller know it's full or not? Do they have to whip out graduated cylinders and check the total volumes for every purchase? And then carefully pour back 100 drops into every Sphere and 10 into every phial? And when you're working with liquids, what happens to the stuff that inevitably clings to the insides of measuring devices and empty containers?

And this is assuming a 'drop' is a standardized unit of volume here. And the liquid doesn't change density, but at least that's a safe assumption. Usually.

Oh, goodness. Does it freeze? Boil? Now I'm imagining walking through a blizzard, going into an inn, and trying to melt your wallet. Or finding out it evaporated in the summer. But I suppose it might've just leaked out, instead.

These are all reasons why its good though!

For all the reasons that would make it not work at all you can assume those don't matter because otherwise it wouldn't work and it's magic in a high weirdness setting. For all the reasons that mean there's a bunch of weird infrastructure required to make it work, that's good, because its magic in a high weirdness setting so it being magic and weird is good.

It's weird and impractical while also being mundane enough to be able to imagine.

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EthanSteele
Nov 18, 2007

I can hear you


Epicurius posted:

People can go into more detail than I can, but basically, souls are "us". They're the fundamental things that give personality, intelligence, creativity, and so on. Things like the Primordials/Yozi have a bunch of souls, but people only have one. So, the Yozi Malfeas, the Demon City, for instance, has as souls Ligier the Green Sun, She-Who Stands-in Doorways, the Manse of Echos Ascending, the Street of Golden Lanterns, the Creeping Oracle, and so on. They're all unique, but they're all part of Malfeas.

When we die, our souls reincarnate into new bodies. However, because of the Primordial war and the Neverborn, the normal process is corrupted, and it's possible for a soul to get too attached to something in its old life and not reincarnate. These souls become ghosts.

Some beings having multiple souls off doing poo poo also ends up with stuff like one of the souls being regarded as a simpleton dancer or whatever and then the main entity being very embarrassed about this because he likes to project an image of being a No Nonsense Mondo Macho Man but there's this side of him just out there for everyone to see and interact with that's Dipshit McJazzHands

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