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Prism
Dec 22, 2007

yospos


A beer stein is absolutely a cup IMO - that isnt even weird semantics. And probably a better option than my first idea, which was a kid's sippy cup (you can seal over the opening for transport).

What counts as an agent of chaos for his bane? Just any human? (Edit: originally I had non-angel here but I don't know what supernaturals would count.)

Also do you have to hit him with it hard, or is he vulnerable to any touch from it?

Prism fucked around with this message at 18:04 on Oct 3, 2019

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Prism
Dec 22, 2007

yospos


Servetus posted:

This is getting dangerously close to "Dare you enter my Magical Realm?"

I mean, you could also just stab someone and fill it with blood.

Okay, four someones.

Prism
Dec 22, 2007

yospos


hyphz posted:

Allergy: you're allergic to something. The bonus depends on how allergic you are (in terms of a universal dice pool penalty) and how common the allergen is. For some reason it appears to be a tradition that the sample characters in Shadowrun have ridiculous allergies; for example, almost all the sample characters in Fourth Edition were allergic to gold. Sixth Edition also continues with that, giving us a combat magician and a technomancer both allergic to grass, a decker allergic to dairy, a weapon specialist allergic to strawberries, and this charming lady:



The street shaman, who they chose to be represented by this art, is allergic to insect stings. I mean, you couldn't make it up.

To be fair, if I was deathly allergic to insect stings, but could learn the ability to control insects, I would. Good way to avoid getting accidentally stung.

Allergic to gold, though, really? Is that even a thing?
edit: apparently it is! Who knew.

Prism fucked around with this message at 20:26 on Oct 8, 2019

Prism
Dec 22, 2007

yospos


I forgot about the insect spirit thing. And I didn't know

hyphz posted:

Which would be cool if true, but she doesn't actually have the power to control insects. She has the ability to summon Beast Spirits, which she can choose to be insects, but could also choose to be literally anything else she's not allergic to.

That bit at all.

Nessus posted:

I don't think you CAN be allergic to gold. It's like titanium, biology just kind of frowns at it and either leaves it there or throws it in the colon.

I thought that too, but I did a quick look and apparently you can be, though it's a minor thing (the primary people investigating it are dermatologists). You are right in that gold does not really cause any problems when ingested.

Edit: It also appears to be gold sodium thiosulfate that causes the reaction rather than pure gold, which would be fine - it's just that you get that in gold-plated items or impure gold.

Prism fucked around with this message at 21:59 on Oct 8, 2019

Prism
Dec 22, 2007

yospos


Ithle01 posted:

Yup, I can't remember the name, but the NES D&D game was actually DragonLance. I think there might've been a Forgotten Realms one too, not sure.

There is; Pool of Radiance (the first Forgotten Realms gold box game) had a NES port and it's probably the one you are thinking of.

Actually there were a surprising number of NES D&D games; Heroes of the Lance and its sequel Dragons of Flame, Dragonstrike, Pool of Radiance, Hillsfar (also Forgotten Realms)... I might be missing one.

Prism fucked around with this message at 15:01 on Dec 4, 2019

Prism
Dec 22, 2007

yospos


Cythereal posted:

Also a point in Eberron's favor. Elves are your pick of: soulless megacorp, jungle-dwelling necromancers, or fantasy Scythians.

Aren't the necromancers good, too? Just really into keeping their ancestors around. They're certainly better than the corporate elves...

Hell, IIRC Deathless run on positive energy so they don't even default to evil.

Prism
Dec 22, 2007

yospos


wiegieman posted:

You can run on positive energy and still be a racist, imperialist rear end in a top hat.

You sure can! I didn't say they can't be evil, only that they don't have to be, which is A Thing for 99% of undead in 3.5E, when Eberron was written.

Edit: maybe I should F&F the new 5E Eberron stuff... would people be interested in that? I know Eberron has been started before, but I think it was abandoned and it would have been the 3E stuff anyway.

Prism fucked around with this message at 18:22 on Dec 4, 2019

Prism
Dec 22, 2007

yospos


Althalin posted:

I got the :justpost: treatment, and so shall you.

I'm in the midst of a 5e campaign at the moment, so I at least would be interested in seeing what you make of Eberron

MonsterEnvy posted:

I think it would be cool. Eberron's cool.

Seems reasonable! I'll reread the book and then get to posting in the next few days.

Prism
Dec 22, 2007

yospos


Seatox posted:

Wait, Ember is a red dragon. Red dragons are immune to fire, why did she scream in agony when Flamestrike used her red dragon fire breath attack on her?

Who wrote this drat cutscene?!

Oh, that's easy: like everything else in 1E, red dragons are not immune to fire. They don't even resist it. You can light fire elementals on fire in 1E; the rules don't care. Works in the Gold Box games, too.

Prism fucked around with this message at 23:24 on Dec 6, 2019

Prism
Dec 22, 2007

yospos


Seatox posted:

Also, here's a fun thing out of the OD&D Rules Cyclopedia about dragons and their immunities:

(...)

So, you could fireball basic D&D red dragons, but they no-sold their own breath attacks (meaning Red vs Red would be a badass contest of claws and teeth, not some sad standoff zappy fight)

That part isn't in the AD&D Monster Manual (I just checked) though it makes a lot of sense. Did they just... forget?

They did give them a (very small) bonus to saving throws against certain damage types, depending on what damage type their breath weapon was, and very good saving throws in general.

Prism fucked around with this message at 03:35 on Dec 7, 2019

Prism
Dec 22, 2007

yospos


Green Intern posted:

Dragons are all apex predators with PHDs and should act like it.

They don't even all have PhDs yet.

The general intelligence of an adult white dragon in 1E is Average (Low), so in the 7-9 range. For black dragons, it's 'average' (8-10), for greens, it's 'average to very' (8-12), and for blues, it's 'very' (11-12). Metallics average a little higher; copper and brass are 'high', so 13-14.

Only red, bronze, silver, and especially gold dragons are really smart, but they're still no smarter than a human can be. Gold dragons are geniuses (17-18) and the other three are 'exceptional', so about 15-16.

(By comparison, in later editions, gold dragon wyrmlings have 14 and go up from there all the way up to 32 at great wyrm. Even white dragons get up to the 18-20 INT range and they're frequently described as stupid - and, by dragon standards, they are. Though it's easier to have stats over 18 in 3E, dragons are still a lot smarter in comparison to everybody else.)

Prism fucked around with this message at 16:27 on Dec 15, 2019

Prism
Dec 22, 2007

yospos


Omnicrom posted:

Fire Emblem 11/Shadow Dragon is the one and only FE that took after Valkyria Chronicles by having a mechanic such that if you were under a certain number of units after every map you were given mooks to make up the difference. Said mooks were pulled in from a big long list, had exactly baseline stats, and about halfway through that list (in the localization at least) you got characters with mocking names that essentially called you bad at the game for chewing through enough characters to see them.

I think fielding the team of Wymp, Laim, Auffle, Rejek and Wieklin is hilarious, but that's me.

Prism
Dec 22, 2007

yospos


Mors Rattus posted:

See, I would assume that a being of pure goodness would be most vulnerable to this kind of trap, because no matter what they can't make a right choice. Accept for the moment that the eggs count as children; they are definitely being treated as such in the story and in D&D dragons-in-egg are already, IIRC, sentient beings who are learning from their surroundings which is why hatchlings pop out with full baby dragon capabilities (including speech).

Either they allow the world to inch closer to destruction by inaction, or by action they risk the deaths of their children, whom they love dearly. While those deaths are not their fault but the fault of the eggnappers, they still have to choose between an evil of action or an evil of inaction. Philosophically, it has been shown repeatedly that people intuitively find the evil of inaction to be less bad than the evil of action, but sure, let's assume dragons are beings of ultimate good.

How could a being of ultimate good not be paralyzed by indecision here? Compassion and caring are traits of goodness, or at least I cannot recognize a goodness that does not fundamentally center compassion, kindness and justice. As beings of pure goodness not intimately feel the intense pain of both risking the world and risking the lives of literal children - not least their own? Why would you expect them to be able to calmly and rationally decide to sacrifice the lives of children for the world, rather than be utterly unable to act due to psychological pain and empathy?

Dragons aren't ultimate good in this era of Dragonlance, nor do they have supernatural levels of insight.

They're very powerful on the human scale and the best of them are very good, but not all of them are the best of them, and some metallic dragons are selfish and don't much care for philosophy. It's not a surprise that this plot works on many dragons, but you'd expect some of them to snap and attack out of spite, vengeance, or retribution (depending on your point of view), or understand that their eggs are going to die now no matter what because evil people have them and they're definitely not going to give them back.

At least they could help the people fighting the eggnappers behind the scenes more. Lots of dragons can shapeshift! They can just... go places as a human and drop information even if they can't fight! Turn into animals and guide heroes! The Dragonarmies clearly don't notice whenever they do this or they would have spotted that silver dragon in the party.

Edit: Dargent, right, that was the name. It escaped me.

Prism
Dec 22, 2007

yospos


Tylana posted:

The more Dragonlance lore that comes out the more I want a setting where worshipping any of the Good or Evil gods is illegal for causing too many wars. (Maybe some big placation festivals, but no churches/preaching/admittedly to being a cleric of them). Obviously they'd still have cults.

For all Golarion's problems, Paizo occasionally has an interesting idea.

One of those is Rahadoum. After a series of destructive religious wars between the priests of Nethys (true neutral god of magic, insane because he can see everything), Norgorber (neutral evil god of secrets, thievery and assassination) and Sarenrae (neutral good goddess of the sun, redemption and healing), a nation rose in that region that had developed a philosophical code, the Laws of Mortality. The First Law is 'Let no mortal be beholden to a god'. Rahadoum knows the gods exist, they just don't want anything to do with them because they're all trouble. Worship is banned and actually being a cleric gets you exiled (or killed if you were proselytizing). Rahadoum's leaders aren't evil - the Council of Elders trend LN, but they are extremely strict about the First Law.

I played a Rahadoumi philosopher in a campaign and I had a lot of fun being anti-theist.

Prism
Dec 22, 2007

yospos


Libertad! posted:

Dragons of Triumph: 3rd Edition Changes

21. Ariakas’ Crown of Power, the Miceram, is given appropriate stats and backstory. It was originally worn by the Kingpriests, and requires daily will saves to avoid moving one’s alignment one step closer to Chaotic Evil (Ariakas is Lawful Evil).

I feel this explains some things.

Prism
Dec 22, 2007

yospos


Night10194 posted:

There is one pretty great picture of a wood elf looking extremely awkward with big poofy slashed sleeves and a huge hat for the Hinterglades. She's still wearing elf tights and pointy shoes, too, and has a little bindle-stick to represent she's a vagabond. That elf looks like fun to play.

I really want to see this picture.

Prism fucked around with this message at 17:12 on Apr 29, 2020

Prism
Dec 22, 2007

yospos



Thank you, it's appreciated.

You're right. It's a good picture.

Prism
Dec 22, 2007

yospos


Night10194 posted:

Skaven are the kind of people who would invent a coating for their tank to stop the magnetic mines they just invented because clearly if they have them all their enemies do but none of their enemies do and also now the tank doesn't work.

That's not true.

Skaven are their own worst enemies, so at least one of their enemies also have magnetic mines.

Prism
Dec 22, 2007

yospos


Falconier111 posted:

Mystara :colbert:

Actually, has Spelljammer ever gotten a writeup? It is the other way you get between AD&D settings :v:

I started it, but I abandoned it because of real life stuff, so having someone else do it would be good.

Prism
Dec 22, 2007

yospos


Dallbun posted:

317: Dewey Cheatam and Howe
Mr. Howe, a lawyer gnome, approaches the PC in an inn. He’s got a loan contract apparently signed by one of the PCs. They supposedly borrowed 8,000 gp and need to pay back 11,000 by tonight. The fine print reads that if they’re “in arrears, two of his [sic] levels are forfeit for every day he is late.” Two of his levels? Yes. He will be visited that night by Miss Cheatam, a vampire.

There are some holes here, like why the hell the PC’s (forged?) signature is on that contract, but this is so weird I can’t help but be charmed. Keep.

I'm surprised the gnome wasn't D. Cheatam and the vampire Miss Howe. The names line up better that way.

Or maybe it's just me that thinks Cheatam sounds more like a gnome surname.

Prism
Dec 22, 2007

yospos


Now I want to know what the original ways the girl was saved are.

Prism
Dec 22, 2007

yospos


Nessus posted:

If the issue was "this additional mass means we are slightly slower and we have literally no margin on bottled oxygen": Jettison a pallet of cargo. Cut all physical training, smoking ban, maybe crack open the air supply on the space suits if you need to.

If the issue was something exchanging X amount of oxygen and now being asked to do X+1, leading to eventual choking: as above (to slow the problem); lower cabin pressure if it isn't already at the tight-rear end minimum; if necessary, sedate the stowaway or a volunteer crewman so it's more like X+0.1. (Being sedated for days would certainly not be fun, but sure beats dying.)

Given the era, one would also ask this hypothetical Mr. Campbell: Are you saying that these brave souls would not have a gentlemanly drawing of straws to see who will "accidentally" perish in a manner that will guarantee a generous life insurance payout to their widow? Do you think so poorly of our Homo spaciens?

My guesses would've been the atmospheric one (if you can't just... ignore her weight, because the heat shield is going to have to be overdesigned, because the amount of abuse it takes varies heavily based on weather so you can't cut that down to no margins if you're entering an atmosphere) or, like, jettisoning chairs/clothes/etc.

But I'm actually curious what the ones that were in the earlier drafts were, not the ones that we can think of, because I want to know what was rejected.

Prism
Dec 22, 2007

yospos


Wapole Languray posted:

Anyway this is a stupid concept. There’s wells all over the place, and in them are children. These wells have some edible foodstuff in them, for they are treacle wells or marshmallow wells or cheese wells or whatever the gently caress else not water wells silly. The Children will not leave the wells, but hate the food. If you give them new food, they’ll trade y ou… random junk that begins with a letter of the alphabet based on the substance they eat but not really. Treacle wells give stuff that begin with M and “malignized adrenocortical cells” wells provide things that start with G.

The treacle one is M for molasses. I don't know what the G is.

You're right. This setting book is really stupid.

Prism
Dec 22, 2007

yospos


By popular demand posted:

Let the spirit of Dr. Liston be with me.
He sliced into the patient with such enthusiasm that he swinged and injured a spectator and another spectator collapsed of shock. All 3 died later.

The only surgery with a 300% fatality rate. I'm legitimately impressed.

Prism
Dec 22, 2007

yospos


Dawgstar posted:

The most valid excuse.

It's probably here I confess I play Military Orders, which are said knights. On the downside, it's where all the Deus Vult morons tend to land in the game but on the upside it's led by ALEPH's recreation of Jeanne D'Arc so that's fun.

Can you play this guy in the wargame?

Prism
Dec 22, 2007

yospos


Halloween Jack posted:

I still remember the DARE Officer coming to my school with a suitcase full of fake samples of drugs, to teach us what fake drugs look like? Anyway if there's some white powder in your kitchen pantry, it's something called "angel dust."

It's the secret ingredient in angel food cake.

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Prism
Dec 22, 2007

yospos


wiegieman posted:

3d6+67 is such a ridiculous thing to write that whoever did so just doesn't give a single gently caress.

3d6+67+5.

Because writing it 3d6+72 would be wrong, somehow.

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