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Alhazred
Feb 16, 2011






FreudianSlippers posted:

Here in Iceland during the day babies sleep almost exclusively outdoors if the weather allows (anything short of a storm).

It's a thing In all the nordic countries and there's basically no reason other than "that's what we've allways done".

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Vavrek
Mar 2, 2013

I like your style hombre, but this is no laughing matter. Assault on a police officer. Theft of police property. Illegal possession of a firearm. FIVE counts of attempted murder. That comes to... 29 dollars and 40 cents. Cash, cheque, or credit card?


My dad had one of those for his cats. Plastic, with clear walls. I don't think it had vents. Just gave them a nice view of the outside, and could support lounging in a way narrow windowsills couldn't.

My Lovely Horse
Aug 21, 2010




Just gonna throw out one word: pigeons

Alterian
Jan 28, 2003



My grandma napped my dad/his siblings on the porch during Buffalo, NY winters. She suggested it to my mom when I was born and my mom thought she was nuts.

Ynglaur
Oct 9, 2013



Cold air is good for the lungs. Just need to keep to core temperature up.

Cheesus
Oct 17, 2002

Let us retract the foreskin of ignorance and apply the wirebrush of enlightenment.

Yam Slacker

Here's one lost on me.

In Alison Bechdel's "Fun Home" she recounts the story her grandmother would tell of Alison's father stuck out in a muddy field at age 3 for some time in the late 1930s. He was found by the milkman who brought her father to her grandmother who proceeded to put him into the oven to warm him up.

Alison said it really freaked out her and her siblings, thinking about how that would work with a "modern" (late 60s) oven with heating elements and presumably turning it on.

I've read it several times and I can't find where she explains how exactly it DID "work" for pre-electric/pre-gas stoves. Were those ovens just steel cavities that could have fit a 3 year old child and that without a fire going, it would just allow the child's body heat to reflect back upon them? Or with embers going from the previous meal, just have enough heat to be "pleasantly warm" instead of actually cooking/roasting?

Moo the cow
Apr 30, 2020



Cheesus posted:

I've read it several times and I can't find where she explains how exactly it DID "work" for pre-electric/pre-gas stoves. Were those ovens just steel cavities that could have fit a 3 year old child and that without a fire going, it would just allow the child's body heat to reflect back upon them? Or with embers going from the previous meal, just have enough heat to be "pleasantly warm" instead of actually cooking/roasting?



Keep the door open and they can stay merely warm.

Often used to heat up semi-frozen kittens and the like

Alhazred
Feb 16, 2011






Ynglaur posted:

Cold air is good for the lungs.

There's literally no scientific reason to why we let kids sleep outside.

BonHair
Apr 28, 2007

Welcome to the machine

Alhazred posted:

There's literally no scientific reason to why we let kids sleep outside.

As a parent, it lets me have loud sex without fear of waking the kid. Also I forget to change the air inside by opening windows, which is bad for both me and my kid.

Alhazred
Feb 16, 2011






BonHair posted:

As a parent, it lets me have loud sex without fear of waking the kid. Also I forget to change the air inside by opening windows, which is bad for both me and my kid.

By all means, I'm not saying you shouldn't do it. Just that we shouldn't pretend that it is a rational reason as to why we do it.

Alterian
Jan 28, 2003



Alhazred posted:

There's literally no scientific reason to why we let kids sleep outside.

Research shows that babies sleep better / longer when they sleep in cold air. We've discussed this a couple of times in the parenting thread!

Platystemon
Feb 13, 2012



Sleeping more is strongly correlated with mortality!

in adults

Milo and POTUS
Sep 3, 2017

I will not shut up about the Mighty Morphin Power Rangers. I talk about them all the time and work them into every conversation I have. I built a shrine in my room for the yellow one who died because sadly no one noticed because she died around 9/11. Wanna see it?


Moo the cow posted:



Keep the door open and they can stay merely warm.

Often used to heat up semi-frozen kittens and the like

Nobody likes cold pussy

Milo and POTUS
Sep 3, 2017

I will not shut up about the Mighty Morphin Power Rangers. I talk about them all the time and work them into every conversation I have. I built a shrine in my room for the yellow one who died because sadly no one noticed because she died around 9/11. Wanna see it?


Platystemon posted:

Sleeping more is strongly correlated with mortality!

in adults

Not a mark against it

My Lovely Horse
Aug 21, 2010




Platystemon posted:

Sleeping more is strongly correlated with mortality!

in adults
This guy hasn't woken up in three days. Let's see if he's dead.

Mmmmyep. Oh man, this dataset is coming together nicely.

Prism Mirror Lens
Oct 9, 2012

~*"The most intelligent and meaning-rich film he could think of was Shaun of the Dead, I don't think either brain is going to absorb anything you post."*~






In the intro to “Tellers of Tales”, Maugham writes “A culture is meagre that cannot get fun out of push pin as well as out of poetry.” Apparently this is paraphrasing Bentham, but what is push pin? Wikipedia provides this amusingly opaque description while noting that it “may be confusing or unclear to readers”:

quote:

Push-pin was an English child's game played from the 16th until the 19th centuries In push-pin each player sets one pin (needle) on a table and then tries to push his pin across his opponent's pin. The game is played by two or more players.

But what were the rules? Was it literally just pushing the needles across the table? No one seems to know for sure because there are conflicting descriptions and references to it from various times (maybe it was played on a hat? Or the needles were aimed at object? Or it was like jacks?). So this was common enough in past centuries that every child played it and it was an easily referenced useless pastime but now nobody would know wtf this was.

Prism Mirror Lens fucked around with this message at 08:42 on May 15, 2020

Jeza
Feb 13, 2011

The cries of the dead are terrible indeed; you should try not to hear them.


Push-pin is primarily played on top of a hat (but also any flat, jostlable surface). Each player wagers a needle and places them on top of the hat. Each player takes turns hitting/probably flicking the side of the hat to jostle the needles on top. The first player to get both needles to cross over one another wins both.

Bentham uses push-pin as his example because it embodies the basest form of entertainment and holds no intrinsic merit. There may have been other versions, but this is the traditional variant.

Milo and POTUS
Sep 3, 2017

I will not shut up about the Mighty Morphin Power Rangers. I talk about them all the time and work them into every conversation I have. I built a shrine in my room for the yellow one who died because sadly no one noticed because she died around 9/11. Wanna see it?


If I recall from QI there are some old pub games that nobody has any clue how they were played

Imagined
Feb 2, 2007


I watched a pro loving click on YouTube the other day with a delightful old guy from the British Museum who deciphered the oldest known rulebook for a board game, the Royal Game of Ur, which was played almost 5,000 years ago. In the video this utterly charming old guy teaches another young guy how to play the game with him.

Imagined fucked around with this message at 15:29 on May 15, 2020

dirby
Sep 21, 2004


Fun Shoe

Imagined posted:

teaches another young guy how to play the game with him.
I don't recall his presentation skills coming in to play too much in that particular video, but that young guy is Tom Scott, who has a lot of videos on interesting history, computer stuff, linguistics, and over 2.5 million YouTube subscribers (so not a nobody, but not a famous influencer or whatever).

Ynglaur
Oct 9, 2013



How is 2.5M not at least mildly famous? Is a billion the new million or something?

My Lovely Horse
Aug 21, 2010




Tom Scott kept popping up as a guest in videos for me recently and then in my recommendations, and I subsequently found out I've actually known about him since forever and he was the kid behind the clip where they chuck a drumset of a cliff to make the "ba-dum-pshh" sound.

Cascadia Pirate
Jan 18, 2011


Milo and POTUS posted:

If I recall from QI there are some old pub games that nobody has any clue how they were played

Also, no one knows the rules to the mesoamerican ball game despite it being a major cultural institution for ages.

Cemetry Gator
Apr 3, 2007

Do you find something comical about my appearance when I'm driving my automobile?


And despite still being played today, nobody knows the rules to cricket.

Slimy Hog
Apr 22, 2008



Cemetry Gator posted:

And despite still being played today, nobody knows the rules to cricket.

I know this is a common joke, but I don't really get it, cricket isn't THAT complicated... But I'm also a huge baseball fan, so maybe I'm used to complicated sports

Midjack
Dec 24, 2007






Biscuit Hider

Slimy Hog posted:

I know this is a common joke, but I don't really get it, cricket isn't THAT complicated... But I'm also a huge baseball fan, so maybe I'm used to complicated sports

Cricket is only incomprehensible to people who expect it to be a variant of baseball.

PizzaProwler
Nov 4, 2009


To quote Raphael "You gotta know what a crumpet is to understand cricket."

Lead out in cuffs
Sep 18, 2012

Tanz mit laibach

Im der Pfunderdome!



PizzaProwler posted:

To quote Raphael "You gotta know what a crumpet is to understand cricket."

To be fair, there are regional differences over what a crumpet is, yet all of those regions agree on the rules of cricket.

Lead out in cuffs
Sep 18, 2012

Tanz mit laibach

Im der Pfunderdome!



Imagined posted:

I watched a pro loving click on YouTube the other day with a delightful old guy from the British Museum who deciphered the oldest known rulebook for a board game, the Royal Game of Ur, which was played almost 5,000 years ago. In the video this utterly charming old guy teaches another young guy how to play the game with him.

You can actually read a paper Irving Finkel (the guy in the video) wrote about this: https://www.academia.edu/15173145/O...oyal_Game_of_Ur

He goes into a bunch of detail about the kinds of dice, ways of betting on the game, and proposes several more complex rules than the simplified rule set in that video.

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Alhazred
Feb 16, 2011






Senet was really popular in ancient Egypt. People were buried with the boardgame and murals depicts people playing it:

Yet we have no idea how to actually play it.

Hnefatafl was a popular norse boardgame but the rules to it is either incomplete or mistranslated.

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