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New Yorp New Yorp
Jul 18, 2003

Only in Kenya.


Pillbug

Mister Olympus posted:

People on these very forums regularly use "reign someone in" and "hand over the reigns" as if the reference isn't to the reins of a horse

That's just people not understanding the source of the idiom and using a homophone. You see the same thing with "tow" vs "toe" the line. You even see it with words that are just similar: "loose" and "lose" are frequently used interchangeably these days despite the words being spelled differently, pronounced differently, and having different meanings.

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New Yorp New Yorp
Jul 18, 2003

Only in Kenya.


Pillbug

Cracker King posted:

This is always some thing I like to show younger people about inflation.


When Travis buys snacks at the movie theatre - he gets a lot of candy and popcorn and a soda. Nowadays itíll be like $30 but hereís its $1.80.

https://youtu.be/H3s-L2kvLLM

Also, porn movie theaters.


Another example is the book The Warriors (not the movie) - takes place in NYC in the 80s and in it the main character has only $20 but manages to get several hotdogs, soda, chips, food for friends, train fares- and still manages to have left over cash.

Or any movie that shows cigarette prices, although that's more a function of tax increases than inflation. Clerks is a great one since it takes place almost entirely in a convenience store. It came out in 1994. I just looked up a scene, cigarettes are $1.95 in the background. In New Jersey in 2020? $8.50? $9? Something like that. I haven't been to a convenience store in like 4 months (thanks COVID) so I forget.

New Yorp New Yorp
Jul 18, 2003

Only in Kenya.


Pillbug

Jazerus posted:

maybe that's become a thing in the last decade or so? fobs were originally just for convenience, not to replace the physical key entirely

besides if they have a valet key then they clearly have a physical lock

My car is from 2018 and only has keyless entry. There's no valet key, the fob just slides off of a key that locks the glove box. If you're valeting the car, you just detach the fob and hand that over. You can't lock the doors if the key is in the trunk or cabin of the car unless there's someone else nearby who has a fob. Of course, I also have the option to lock and unlock the doors with an app on my phone, so there's not much of a concern about keys being locked inside.

The key might also lock the trunk but I honestly don't recall if there's a key hole on the trunk. I don't think there is, and the trunk opens if you have the fob nearby anyway so I don't think a key is involved there. I've never had a need to lock the trunk.

New Yorp New Yorp
Jul 18, 2003

Only in Kenya.


Pillbug

HopperUK posted:

I wonder if that's going to become a relic gesture though, like how people will still mime an old-fashioned telephone handset.

Smartwatches are a thing.

New Yorp New Yorp
Jul 18, 2003

Only in Kenya.


Pillbug

Guy Axlerod posted:

Yeah, the lack of dithering means games will never look right on anything but a CRT. But I enjoy having a TV that doesn't weigh hundreds of pounds and generate tons of static/attract dust.

A friend of mine has a classic console collection (including some really cool rare/exotic stuff like a Sharp X68000 and the Famicom Disk System) and where applicable he just runs it through OSSC and it looks great on modern TVs.

New Yorp New Yorp
Jul 18, 2003

Only in Kenya.


Pillbug

Tiggum posted:

My family's first ISP was AOL and I never knew what AOL keywords were or what you did with them. I'd used the internet at school before getting it at home so I just opened the AOL app to make it connect to the internet then left it minimised unless I needed to disconnect (or reconnect).

It was a big deal when AOL and Prodigy started providing internet gateways. There was a long period where they didn't; they weren't ISPs, they were walled-off content providers with no access to the internet. My family had Prodigy from the early 90s through to the late 90s. I convinced them to get a real ISP account in the mid 90s so I could play Ultima Online and Warcraft 2 via Kali's IPX emulation, but they still used Prodigy for years afterwards.

New Yorp New Yorp
Jul 18, 2003

Only in Kenya.


Pillbug

hexwren posted:

This sentence from the netiquette memo now means the opposite of what it meant.

quote:

Never send chain letters via electronic mail. Chain letters
are forbidden on the Internet. Your network privileges
will be revoked.

If only.

New Yorp New Yorp
Jul 18, 2003

Only in Kenya.


Pillbug

A Festivus Miracle posted:

I compared a thing to Time Cube recently and my younger cousin (who's twenty) had no idea what that is.

I'm old enough to vaguely remember a time before cellphones were widespread, so go figure.

I graduated college before cell phones were widespread (2004). They were certainly catching on, but it wasn't that uncommon to not have one. It's weird to think back on how we organized things and communicated. Lots of AOL Instant Messenger and waiting around places. Hell, people didn't even commonly bring laptops to class at that time. I remember one guy who always brought a laptop and I thought he was a weirdo. And I was studying computer science!

I forgot my phone for the first time in years a few days ago when I went out to run a few errands and felt lost and disconnected for the hour without it.

New Yorp New Yorp
Jul 18, 2003

Only in Kenya.


Pillbug

wesleywillis posted:

I finished college in '03. Same here. Not everyone had a cell phone, most had land lines. I think I had both? Also, no facebook, or anything like that that I can remember. Nobody that I knew had Live Journal, and even myspace was a few years away.
Sometime in the last week of school, one guy went around and got everyone's number on a piece of paper, or most people's numbers. Then photocopied it and handed it out. But like after a few months all those numbers were mostly dead because people either moved away for jobs, so their landline was gone, their cell number changed. A lot of times, even with the same carrier, if they just moved to a different area, the number got changed. There was no number portability or whatever they call it.

poo poo, a lot of people didn't even have email addresses besides their college address. Which luckily we were able to keep for about a year and a half or so after we finished.

I think Facebook existed but wasn't opened to students at my school at the time, at least during my senior year. I remember it opening up to students at my school in 2005 or so, but I no longer had a college email address. I was banished to MySpace, where you could modify your personal page with HTML and people had the most hideous abominations of pages with flashing text and embedded music that you've ever seen.

Hey, kids! There was a time before Facebook was open to anyone who wanted to join! It was only for college students, and even then, not every college! You had to have an email address at a supported school to join.

But yeah, I fell out of touch with a lot of friends because there was no good way to remain in touch. And my college relationship ended almost immediately after graduation (as they so often do), so there were a few women whose contact information I immediately regretted not having.

New Yorp New Yorp fucked around with this message at 19:02 on Mar 14, 2021

New Yorp New Yorp
Jul 18, 2003

Only in Kenya.


Pillbug

Edgar Allen Ho posted:

As a babby who is scared of phone calls it's amazing to me that you olds would just... call up your high school bros to chat or whatever. The closest I've ever gotten is facetiming and only for romantic partners

And there were a limited number of phone lines (most houses had 1, maybe 2 if they had kids or liked using dial-up at the same time as other people made phone calls), which was shared by all the phones in the house. So your parents could pick up the phone and hear what you were saying. And you'd have to get off the internet to make a phone call if you didn't have a separate line.

There's the "drat chatty teenage girl ties up the phone all the time" trope that you'll see in old sitcoms.

New Yorp New Yorp
Jul 18, 2003

Only in Kenya.


Pillbug

Parahexavoctal posted:

I still do that, although the number of people with whom I do it has plummeted.

I've had friends for over a decade that I have literally never spoken to on the phone. Entirely text and in-person communication.

The only people I talk to on the phone now are my wife and other family-types. My wife is the only one I talk to on a regular basis, and it's usually short communication like "I'm on my way home, do you need anything from the grocery store? Okay, text me a list."

New Yorp New Yorp
Jul 18, 2003

Only in Kenya.


Pillbug

doctorfrog posted:

People still say "tape" when they talk about recording video. I don't know anyone all that young though, so maybe it's all "record" or "unlivestream" something.

Yeah, and people called removable storage media "floppy disks" long after they hadn't been floppy for ages. I called them floppies despite never having seen an 8 inch actually-floppy disk. The 5.25 disks weren't all that floppy, and the 3.5 inch disks weren't floppy at all! I don't know why, but the transition from rectangular removable storage to round removable storage killed the "floppy".

New Yorp New Yorp fucked around with this message at 21:04 on Mar 17, 2021

New Yorp New Yorp
Jul 18, 2003

Only in Kenya.


Pillbug

Edgar Allen Ho posted:

And yet you don't know how to change a tire. Curious.

e: that might actually be thread relevant, because aren't modern tires a hell of a lot more robust? I've never had a flat and I drove cross-continent multiple times as a dumbass kid (ie like four years ago) without doing any maintenance at all, never until recently took the tire pressure light seriously, never in my life have a had a flat or blowout or had anyone in my family or friend group have a flat. One blowout among them on a 20+ year old piece of poo poo.

Yes, and there are also things like run flat tires now. I've personally never had a flat in ~20 years of driving, but my wife managed to hit a nasty pothole a few winters ago and pop one of the tires on my car. It has run flat tires, which let you keep driving on a flat for 100 miles or so as long as you're careful and don't go too fast, so she was able to limp the car home.

My grandfather did a lot of research and development on various plastics and rubbers in the 50s through the 80s and he still keeps up on the industry despite being 94. I could probably reach out to him and ask what's changed and receive a very detailed answer, but I prefer not interacting with my family when I can avoid it.

New Yorp New Yorp
Jul 18, 2003

Only in Kenya.


Pillbug

One Nut Wonder posted:

Funny you should mention this. I'm a 38 year old manager and several of my coworkers are still in high school. I decided to ask each one of them what the save icon was a picture of. They gave me bewildered looks.

I explained what a floppy disk was, and they looked like I'd grown a second head. So last weekend I ordered a USB 3.5" drive and some disks. Put a README. txt file on there that said, "Hello, world!"

Gave them out today. They seemed genuinely surprised, like I was just messing with them.

Did their heads explode when you told them that those disks store about 100,000 times less than a USB thumb drive?

New Yorp New Yorp
Jul 18, 2003

Only in Kenya.


Pillbug

Comstar posted:

Ok Genius, what is the correct answer? My dad is moving old pictures and home movies to DVD...which is now obsolescent. My current PC does not have an optical drive and I have 100 CD's I can't import to iTunes until I remove it from my old dead PC to the new one.

When I stick them in the cloud I now have to pay for that storage now AND it's format probably won't be readable format for my 3 year old to be able to watch when he's 18 either.


I'm serious here- What's the answer to this problem? I am not storing nuclear waste for the next 10,000 years here. Upload it to Youtube and have THEM care about the format and storage?

This is a legitimate problem. Physical removable storage "rots" quickly even if stored optimally. Most magnetic disks from the 90s are unusable now. Writable CDs and DVDs only last for about 10-15 years -- the dyes that they use break down. That's totally aside from the fact that there's no guarantee that a popular file format today will still be readable by common software in the future and that the physical devices themselves break down or simply just use interfaces that are no longer supported. Remember PCMCIA/PC Card? Remember ISA? VLB? AGP? And so on.

New Yorp New Yorp
Jul 18, 2003

Only in Kenya.


Pillbug

JacquelineDempsey posted:

Lol, even VJs are obsolete, no? I referenced Downtown Julie Brown the other day at work and was met with blank stares.


She has a show on Sirius!

New Yorp New Yorp
Jul 18, 2003

Only in Kenya.


Pillbug

Teriyaki Hairpiece posted:

I just googled it and I still don't fully understand what a "smartboard" is. It's just a big screen you can write on like a tablet, right?

We didn't even have whiteboards when I was a lad.

Some are just giant tablets. Some are e-ink style drawing surfaces with special "marker" styluses.

New Yorp New Yorp
Jul 18, 2003

Only in Kenya.


Pillbug

My Lovely Horse posted:

Some of the styluses look extremely similar to permanent markers, ask me how I know.

In college (in the dark ages of 20 years ago), I attended classes in a brand new building that had just opened and had the walls painted with "whiteboard paint" where you could draw on the walls directly with erasable markers. Only the wall facing the class was painted that way.

My calculus professor did not realize that and proceeded to draw a wall full of equations on a wall that could not be erased.

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New Yorp New Yorp
Jul 18, 2003

Only in Kenya.


Pillbug

FreudianSlippers posted:

Wasn't there a blind dude called Joybubbles who became a legend in the Phreaker (like hackers except for with phones) community in the 60s due to his ability to hack phones and get free long distance calls by whistling at the exact correct frequency.

Yes. There was also John Draper, aka Captain Crunch, who got his name because he discovered that a toy whistle included as a prize in Captain Crunch cereal had a pitch of exactly 2600 hz, which is what the phone companies used.

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