Register a SA Forums Account here!
JOINING THE SA FORUMS WILL REMOVE THIS BIG AD, THE ANNOYING UNDERLINED ADS, AND STUPID INTERSTITIAL ADS!!!

You can: log in, read the tech support FAQ, or request your lost password. This dumb message (and those ads) will appear on every screen until you register! Get rid of this crap by registering your own SA Forums Account and joining roughly 150,000 Goons, for the one-time price of $9.95! We charge money because it costs us $3,400 per month for bandwidth bills alone, and since we don't believe in shoving popup ads to our registered users, we try to make the money back through forum registrations.
«3 »
  • Post
  • Reply
lllllllllllllllllll
Feb 28, 2010

Now the scene's lighting is perfect!


What about social conventions like saying thanks, hello and bye? I could imagine going from barely recognising those to a complete turnaround where adults with autism are relying on them a little too much, appearing a little stiff and formal. Is it difficult for someone with autism to experience this, uh, brief closeness to someone else by following the above mentioned social conventions? Would you stick with it like it was a rule and if so do you feel irritated by all the people who may or may not follow those but are quick to offend when you don't? And last question, was there a moment where you recognised following along was better than to avoid it (like with eye-contact?)? Thanks.

Adbot
ADBOT LOVES YOU

mycelia
Apr 28, 2013

just a big doofus fightin pokemons





lllllllllllllllllll posted:

What about social conventions like saying thanks, hello and bye? I could imagine going from barely recognising those to a complete turnaround where adults with autism are relying on them a little too much, appearing a little stiff and formal. Is it difficult for someone with autism to experience this, uh, brief closeness to someone else by following the above mentioned social conventions? Would you stick with it like it was a rule and if so do you feel irritated by all the people who may or may not follow those but are quick to offend when you don't? And last question, was there a moment where you recognised following along was better than to avoid it (like with eye-contact?)? Thanks.

Yet another adult-diagnosed autistic chiming in: I absolutely do get irritated when people ignore normal social conventions. I know it's completely irrational but some part of my brain is going "no, I learned this, that's not how you do it! Someone's going to yell at you for not being Normal(tm)!"

Learning to follow along came around high school. Like someone said last page, being an academic overachiever (plus being born a girl; autistic trans club represent) meant a lot of people assumed I was just shy and bookish. Which I was, but that wasn't the only reason I had no friends. I did figure out the bridge of the nose trick quickly, which ironically made it harder to get diagnosed because psychs would always write down that I "maintained good eye contact".

Leg-jiggling chat: my wife has the ADHD/autism/OCD trifecta and jiggles her leg constantly.

JetBlack
May 22, 2020



credburn posted:

Something like fifteen years ago someone on this forum made an ask/tell thing about autism. I can't remember much of it, only thinking it was kind of interesting, and I remember there was that fellow whose online handle was something like ullululuul and he having autism. I could relate in a lot of ways to these two, except I wasn't autistic.

Whoops fifteen years later actually turns out I have autism and it explains a LOT of my life. Since my diagnosis like two years ago (I'm 35 now) I've recontextualized my entire life, and I feel I have a somewhat handy perspective on life as a "high-functioning person with autism" (or Aspergers, but both that term and "high functioning" aren't really acceptable anymore. For the sake of helping anyone understand, though, I'll just use them. They do a better job of illustrating a person's capacity for autonomy and executive function than the more politically-correct replacement terms do. I think for a little while, we're going to be in a nomenclature limbo until we can find a fun way to say "low functioning." because I spent 33 years not knowing I was autistic and trying god drat loving hard to be "normal." I have at times, like a drunken chameleon, fit in around the normies around me, and other times now. But I've lived on both sides, and have two different perspectives on what an autistic person is. I say all that because I think that gives me a unique advantage in understanding how to convey some of the nuances of autism with someone who is neuro-typical and perhaps does not really "get" autism.

Soanyway. Ask me whatever. I'm happy to share what I can; it is therapeutic for me, too, as discussions like this I imagine can in turn help me better understand how I am perceived or how others might feel toward someone like me.

Oh, one more disclaimer: autism is a spectrum, right? On one side of it you have cool dudes like Anthony Hopkins and, I don't know, Beethoven probably, who can utilize autistic superpowers to propel them into greatness. But on the other side of the spectrum there are people who can't speak, who can't walk, who live in a wheelchair and drool and will never experience life beyond that. My own experiences are unique to me, but I suspect there are many facets that have a much wider application. One might suppose I fall somewhere around the middle - I'm certainly not what one would call "low functioning," but at the same time, I'm so awkward and anxious and puzzled by the world around me that a lot of the time it feels like I'm just two really big mistakes from ending up in a situation where I need someone to look after me. Anyway, it's kind of like asking a black guy what it's like being black. His experiences aren't going to be representative of all black people, but maybe a lot of them, and as a white guy I sure as poo poo don't know what it's like.

Do you constantly find yourself arranging poo poo according to shape and size?

Honest question. I know very little about autism.

Dance Officer
May 4, 2017

It would be awesome if we could dance!


That's something that young kids do. Not really an adult thing.

Tjadeth
Sep 16, 2012

Cat Army
2nd Battalion
VOLUNTEER


AngryRobotsInc posted:

On the trans topic, an interesting tidbit, and one where no one is quite certain why, those who are transgender show a higher degree of autism spectrum disorders than you find in just a general slice of the population.

This is a near decade-old study, but I vibe pretty hard with the term "gender incoherence".

An interesting sidebar is the suggestion that autistic people tend to look younger than their age for likewise chemical reasons. I've seen autistic people saying they get mistaken for high schoolers or college students, but it's usually written off as a matter of behavior or clothing. I know me and my more autistic-seeming family members have plenty of stories of people thinking we're ten years younger than we are. Anyone else in that boat?

Jack Trades
Nov 30, 2010



If I shave they start asking me for my ID at the liquor store, because of my babyface. If I don't then they don't.

Adbot
ADBOT LOVES YOU

Gantolandon
Aug 19, 2012



Tjadeth posted:

This is a near decade-old study, but I vibe pretty hard with the term "gender incoherence".

An interesting sidebar is the suggestion that autistic people tend to look younger than their age for likewise chemical reasons. I've seen autistic people saying they get mistaken for high schoolers or college students, but it's usually written off as a matter of behavior or clothing. I know me and my more autistic-seeming family members have plenty of stories of people thinking we're ten years younger than we are. Anyone else in that boat?

Yeah, if not for male pattern balding, I look very young. People usually think I'm less than 30 and if I shave my head, I look like a college student.

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • Post
  • Reply
«3 »