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Violet_Sky
Dec 5, 2011



Fun Shoe

turd in my singlet posted:

it's v common for people who don't act exactly like the stereotype of autism to not get diagnosed

i didn't get diagnosed until i was like 27 even though i'm obviously autistic???????

women and minorities especially have this problem from my understanding

This is an interesting article written by a late diagnosed woman:

https://howilostallmyfs.medium.com/when-youre-autistic-but-don-t-seem-like-it-1430209b92d1

That bit about not being able to focus when other people are conversing got to me. I assumed I had some kind of hearing problem.

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Karenina
Jul 9, 2013



turd in my singlet posted:

women and minorities especially have this problem from my understanding

This is an interesting article written by a late diagnosed woman:

https://howilostallmyfs.medium.com/when-youre-autistic-but-don-t-seem-like-it-1430209b92d1

yeah, i can vouch for being diagnosed with ADHD by someone who didn't know what they were doing and getting medicated for a disorder i didn't have, which was a pretty terrible experience. the good news is i ended up seeing a therapist who did know what he was doing. dude knew what he was doing as an autistic guy (diagnosed in his 50s, too) whose big thing just happened to be psychology and personalities

Klaaz
Sep 23, 2003



to get back on the topic of great aspie characters in series. Max´ persona in Parenthood is excellently crafted and acted. He really reminds me of myself when I was still a boy and teenager except that I don´t have that much problems with figurative speech and I am not really a math wizard (not at all). The show itself is kinda cheesy and melodramatic although me and my wife got used to that halway through the second season. I guess it´s not for everyone and I probably would´ve never watched it if it wasn´t partly about growing up with autism but that part is really good. Lot's of typical american family values being shoveled up your nose though but as I said I got used to it and even consider it endearing at some level. If I am correct it's from the same maker as Friday Night Lights and it has quite a couple of actors from that show.

turd in my singlet
Jul 5, 2008

DO ALL DA WORK

WIT YA NECK

*heavy metal music playing*

Nap Ghost

Violet_Sky posted:

That bit about not being able to focus when other people are conversing got to me. I assumed I had some kind of hearing problem.

https://twitter.com/autisticats/status/1343994411466838016

this twitter thread covers some basics about how autistic people's senses work differently than neurotypical people's, including several references

ultrafilter
Aug 23, 2007






Predictive coding explains a lot more than just autism. It's not mainstream yet but it probably will be in the near future.

Organza Quiz
Nov 7, 2009




I'm currently being assessed for ASD (probably a couple more sessions left) and I'm curious about how others think about time and the future and how that relates to enjoying routine and not liking changes of plans.

Before a psych started asking me a bunch of questions about my life, I wouldn't have said that I require routine or a schedule particularly. It's not something out of the list of autistic traits that I've particularly identified with. While thinking about it more though I realised I am actually pretty bad at dealing with sudden changes to my near future.

This has always felt logical though because I'm basically always thinking about the future and visualising events that I know will happen in the near future, and if I can't clearly picture how I think something will go then I get very nervous.

It was most obvious to me before I got my first tattoo - everything I read about the process was basically that it's super dependent on the person how it feels and how much it hurts and where hurts more than other places, and how it heals... so I basically felt like there was a huge blank zone in my mind's eye for the afternoon of the appointment and that really freaked me out. It was fine in the end though and now I kinda like the process because the healing goes through very defined, predictable stages that I'm familiar with now.

Anyway that means I don't deal well with sudden changes of plans because I've been imagining one future so clearly and all of a sudden I have to readjust to the new change of plans.

Does that sound familiar to anyone else? Do those of you who prefer routine prefer it for a different reason?

turd in my singlet
Jul 5, 2008

DO ALL DA WORK

WIT YA NECK

*heavy metal music playing*

Nap Ghost

The thing about the autism "spectrum" is that it isn't like a linear gradient of "autistic/not autistic", it's a collection of traits that can be more or less present in basically any combination and people who share the same traits may experience them very differently. "If you've met one autistic person, you've met one autistic person" is a common phrase I've seen in the community, which means that the experience of autism isn't really generalizable beyond a tendency towards certain traits.

Organza Quiz posted:

Anyway that means I don't deal well with sudden changes of plans because I've been imagining one future so clearly and all of a sudden I have to readjust to the new change of plans.

Does that sound familiar to anyone else? Do those of you who prefer routine prefer it for a different reason?

Tbh I've never thought that much into the process of my desire for routine lol. That does sound familiar but for me what I notice most about having something disrupted is that it kind of takes a little while to get into focusing on a task then if something comes up and I have to stop it's like a train derailing... my brain wants to keep going with whatever the thing was and adapting to a sudden new demand is stressful and takes time to readjust

turd in my singlet fucked around with this message at 17:09 on Jan 31, 2021

whydirt
Apr 18, 2001


Gaz Posting Brigade


Our 2 1/2-year-old with ASD habitually turns off all the overhead lights at night, even if they're dimmed to lower settings. We can't tell if he has light sensitivity issues or is just doing it as a game since after he does it in giggles and runs around. He doesn't seem to mind our lamps. We don't want to make him uncomfortable, but eating dinner in the dark isn't something I'd prefer to do long-term.

Any thoughts? Is there a way to test his light sensitivity or is this something we'll have to muddle through?

TVsVeryOwn
Jan 9, 2011






whydirt posted:

Our 2 1/2-year-old with ASD habitually turns off all the overhead lights at night, even if they're dimmed to lower settings. We can't tell if he has light sensitivity issues or is just doing it as a game since after he does it in giggles and runs around. He doesn't seem to mind our lamps. We don't want to make him uncomfortable, but eating dinner in the dark isn't something I'd prefer to do long-term.

Any thoughts? Is there a way to test his light sensitivity or is this something we'll have to muddle through?

I loving hate reostatted lights. The moderated level of light that some people find pleasant or reminiscent of candle just stresses me out. It makes my eyes feel like they're stuck switching between low light and regular light mode.

Mister Olympus
Oct 31, 2011

Buzzard, Who Steals From Dead Bodies


I had mine diagnosed by an optometrist.

Buried alive
Jun 8, 2009


Organza Quiz posted:

I'm currently being assessed for ASD (probably a couple more sessions left) and I'm curious about how others think about time and the future and how that relates to enjoying routine and not liking changes of plans.

Before a psych started asking me a bunch of questions about my life, I wouldn't have said that I require routine or a schedule particularly. It's not something out of the list of autistic traits that I've particularly identified with. While thinking about it more though I realised I am actually pretty bad at dealing with sudden changes to my near future.

This has always felt logical though because I'm basically always thinking about the future and visualising events that I know will happen in the near future, and if I can't clearly picture how I think something will go then I get very nervous.

It was most obvious to me before I got my first tattoo - everything I read about the process was basically that it's super dependent on the person how it feels and how much it hurts and where hurts more than other places, and how it heals... so I basically felt like there was a huge blank zone in my mind's eye for the afternoon of the appointment and that really freaked me out. It was fine in the end though and now I kinda like the process because the healing goes through very defined, predictable stages that I'm familiar with now.

Anyway that means I don't deal well with sudden changes of plans because I've been imagining one future so clearly and all of a sudden I have to readjust to the new change of plans.

Does that sound familiar to anyone else? Do those of you who prefer routine prefer it for a different reason?

Rings super true with me. Sometimes it's okay because I have some other routine, or process, or whatever that I can switch to. When that's not available, though, cripes it's super upsetting.

impossiboobs
Oct 2, 2006



whydirt posted:

Our 2 1/2-year-old with ASD habitually turns off all the overhead lights at night, even if they're dimmed to lower settings. We can't tell if he has light sensitivity issues or is just doing it as a game since after he does it in giggles and runs around. He doesn't seem to mind our lamps. We don't want to make him uncomfortable, but eating dinner in the dark isn't something I'd prefer to do long-term.

Any thoughts? Is there a way to test his light sensitivity or is this something we'll have to muddle through?

Is it the light he takes issue with, or does he mention a noise? Some lights can make a noise when they're on, and I know a lot of autistic people say they can "hear" (some describe it as sound, some as a sound-like feeling) electronics that are on. Fluorescent lights especially.

Luneshot
Mar 10, 2014



Some lights definitely make noise. I know as a kid I was always aware of a high-pitched whine from CRT TVs. Haven’t heard it in years, as a natural consequence of aging affecting the ability to hear high frequencies and the declining population of CRTs, but it was noticeable from across the room if I was listening for it.

If they are fluorescent lights, it might be the visual flicker. The 50/60Hz flicker isn’t noticeable to most people, but aging fluorescent tubes can make it worse and it can cause eye strain or headaches in some people who are particularly sensitive to it.

Mecca-Benghazi
Mar 31, 2012



whydirt posted:

Our 2 1/2-year-old with ASD habitually turns off all the overhead lights at night, even if they're dimmed to lower settings. We can't tell if he has light sensitivity issues or is just doing it as a game since after he does it in giggles and runs around. He doesn't seem to mind our lamps. We don't want to make him uncomfortable, but eating dinner in the dark isn't something I'd prefer to do long-term.

Any thoughts? Is there a way to test his light sensitivity or is this something we'll have to muddle through?

One of the few sensory issues I have is that I've always liked dimmer lights than most people. It was a pretty common interaction for me as a kid to be reading wherever with a dim light, and my mom would come in all worried I was hurting my eyes, then flip the switch for the bright white lights that I hated

I do handle yellower lights better, that might be worth a shot if your lights tend to the cooler side

credburn
Jun 22, 2016


Powered Descent posted:

Regarding diagnosischat, what does an official diagnosis actually do for you?

Using myself as an example, I figure I might qualify as a mildly autistic (or I might just be an introvert with a few personality quirks). But I've never seen any reason to go through the hassle of a full evaluation just to get an official yea or nay. Whatever the answer might be, I don't see what practical difference it would actually make to get it.

To sort of reiterate what others have said, but my autism diagnosis was the best things that ever happened to me, because it recontextualized thirty years of being "weird." I'm no longer weird, or stupid, or strange, or hosed up, or retarded, or any other kind of label others have put on me; instead I'm just autistic.

Lucky Greedo
Feb 14, 2012

At last, he held the throat of his beater.

turd in my singlet posted:

The thing about the autism "spectrum" is that it isn't like a linear gradient of "autistic/not autistic", it's a collection of traits that can be more or less present in basically any combination and people who share the same traits may experience them very differently. "If you've met one autistic person, you've met one autistic person" is a common phrase I've seen in the community, which means that the experience of autism isn't really generalizable beyond a tendency towards certain traits.


Tbh I've never thought that much into the process of my desire for routine lol. That does sound familiar but for me what I notice most about having something disrupted is that it kind of takes a little while to get into focusing on a task then if something comes up and I have to stop it's like a train derailing... my brain wants to keep going with whatever the thing was and adapting to a sudden new demand is stressful and takes time to readjust

It's this for me. I get turbo focused on whatever task I'm doing and switching causes stress

Because I am ill at ease with uncertainty I also tend to get into these thought spirals in which I try to envision every possible negative outcome of a new development so that I'm prepared for the worst that could happen. It's extremely time- and energy-consuming and makes it difficult to bring my focus onto the new task. Meds helped a lot with making these less anxiety-laced but there's no getting rid of them, now I just cooly examine the eight thousand possible pitfalls of having to unexpectedly go to the grocery store for a lemon on a busy Saturday during a pandemic.

Unstructured time at work makes me vibrate with distress

EdgyCoffeeMug
Jan 11, 2019



i feel like there is basically 2 types of autistic:

the virgin autistic:
- has some boring hobby like model trains
- tries very hard to fit in with normies
- parasocial, quiet and nerdy
- ridden by all kinds of anxieties

the chad autisticc:
- is into cool poo poo like anime and video games
- doesn't give a poo poo about normie bs, if what you have to say is not related to my special interest then gently caress off normie
- absolutely dominates social situations with his presence
- lives in the present only. act before you think

the reason why im writing this is because im reading all the problems people itt have, and its exactly the kind of mistakes i once made as a teen. like dont probate me bros. i think the goal for you all should be to become the chad kind. the kind i am. basically your first step is to say gently caress it all, start rebeling against the normies in your life.

Dance Officer
May 4, 2017

It would be awesome if we could dance!


gently caress off back to 4chan, thanks

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turd in my singlet
Jul 5, 2008

DO ALL DA WORK

WIT YA NECK

*heavy metal music playing*

Nap Ghost

Lol

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