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StrixNebulosa
Feb 14, 2012

You cheated not only the game, but yourself.
But most of all, you cheated BABA


flippin' through my hoard, deciding what needs to stay vs what needs to go

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Groke
Jul 27, 2007
New Adventures In Mom Strength

pradmer posted:


The Broken Sword by Poul Anderson -$1.99
https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00PI181JI/

Fuckin' rules.

biracial bear for uncut
Jun 9, 2009

ask me about being the most obnoxious person of all time

Groke posted:

We're going on an adventure!

Had strong The Thing vibes off that creature.

pradmer
Mar 31, 2009


The Long Way to a Small, Angry Planet (Wayfarers #1) by Becky Chambers - $2.99
https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00ZP64F28
Reading now and I don't like it as much as I thought I would based on the universal praise. Only half done though.

The Rage of Dragons (The Burning #1) by Evan Winter - $2.99
https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07L2VKFP5/

The Collected Stories of Arthur C Clarke - $1.99
https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07NMJPD6T/

biracial bear for uncut
Jun 9, 2009

ask me about being the most obnoxious person of all time

I got into the Wayfarer books on a recommendation because I had just finished the Last Policeman books and needed something optimistic scifi to read and Chambers does that very well.

pradmer
Mar 31, 2009


biracial bear for uncut posted:

I got into the Wayfarer books on a recommendation because I had just finished the Last Policeman books and needed something optimistic scifi to read and Chambers does that very well.

I can definitely see that. The first two have a great balance of a driving mystery with depression around the edges. The last one is just a kick in the stomach.

mllaneza
Apr 28, 2007


Veteran, Bermuda Triangle Expeditionary Force, 1993-1952





Oh hey, The Galaxy, and the Ground Within: A Novel (Wayfarers Book 4) due on 2/16/2021.

I'm in single digits for authors that I;ll automatically mash the preorder button for, Chambers is definitely one of them.

Bujold, Brust, Cook, Stross, Wells, Lee, Chambers not necessarily in that order.

Kestral
Nov 24, 2000

Forum Veteran

Clapping Larry

Groke posted:

Fuckin' rules.

Seconding this, probably my favorite book I've read this year.

pradmer
Mar 31, 2009


The Lord of the Rings (All 3 books) by JRR Tolkien - $2.99
https://www.amazon.com/dp/B007978OY6/

Teddybear
May 16, 2009

Look! A Samus doll!
It's soooo cute!


Lipstick Apathy

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8fTixQc410o

The Nebulas are starting!

A human heart
Oct 10, 2012



anilEhilated posted:

Well, do they tell you anything about the human condition? Lovecraft doesn't exactly invite you to share his paranoia, Vance's Dying Earth hardly has a message past "people are assholes" and so on. They're just for fun.

pulp doesn't mean that the art is just meaningless fun, it's an indicator that it's lowbrow. lots of pulp art has explicit politics.

SurreptitiousMuffin
Mar 21, 2010


Has anybody got any recommendations for gothy SFF in that sorta Gideon mood? Particularly audiobooks: I've finally caved, and I've found it a really good way to read while I work. I've tried browsing Audible but there's just ... so much porn. Like, a shocking amount of porn that it's apparently impossible to filter out.

The Monster of Elendhaven was super good, and that sorta dark/weird/bittersweet is definitely what I'm going for.

Stupid_Sexy_Flander
Mar 14, 2007

Is a man not entitled to the haw of his maw?


Grimey Drawer

Seven Blades in Black by Sam Sykes has that sort of feel to it. Pretty good, but I have literally no idea if it's in audio format or not.

freebooter
Jul 7, 2009

AUSTRALIA
NEEDS
TURNBULL


Finished The Second Sleep by Robert Harris. Starts off in 15th century England with a priest trying to find an obscure village, but quickly becomes clear (and this isn't much of a spoiler since it's revealed by the end of the first chapter) that it's actually a post-apocalyptic future. I enjoyed it quite a lot while I was reading it, but felt it really didn't bring much new to the genre at all - authoritarian church, fascinating relics of the ancients left behind, what is there to see here in 2020, really? I don't feel like my time was wasted but doubt I'll remember it in a few years and wouldn't really recommend it to anyone.

A human heart posted:

pulp doesn't mean that the art is just meaningless fun, it's an indicator that it's lowbrow. lots of pulp art has explicit politics.

I know I've come to use the term differently than it was intended, but I associate "pulp" with "potboiler" and to a lesser extent "airport fiction" - I don't mean it as a disrespectful description, but rather a phrase for a book that's great fun to read but has a fairly basic prose style and isn't imparting any great message, or at least not in any new or meaningful way. There are basically two different kinds of positive reading experience for me. One is the highbrow type which is full of heavy meaning and beautiful writing and leaves me with the feeling that I've experienced ~Great Literature~, and the other is a fun, enjoyable, page-turning adventure of some variety (maybe it's a space opera! maybe it's a creepy horror story!) that I can read even if I'm sitting on a plane in an unknown time zone with jet lag - exactly the kind of time I wouldn't have the patience for an MFA-style novel. And I guess even on an ordinary day, reading highbrow literature often feels like a chore, like exercising or eating healthily; I know I'll feel long-term benefits from it but I don't feel excited to sit down and read it in the evening.

Those two types aren't necessarily mutually exclusive, but it's rare to find one that does both. And of course it's all too common to find Serious Literature that sucks, and ostensibly fun lowbrow adventure stories that are actually really tedious.

Hedrigall
Mar 27, 2008

Furgiven, but not furgotten


I'm reading Great North Road by Peter F Hamilton, it's pretty good. I'm engrossed in the mystery. After this I might check out his new Salvation series, have they been good?

A human heart
Oct 10, 2012



freebooter posted:

Finished The Second Sleep by Robert Harris. Starts off in 15th century England with a priest trying to find an obscure village, but quickly becomes clear (and this isn't much of a spoiler since it's revealed by the end of the first chapter) that it's actually a post-apocalyptic future. I enjoyed it quite a lot while I was reading it, but felt it really didn't bring much new to the genre at all - authoritarian church, fascinating relics of the ancients left behind, what is there to see here in 2020, really? I don't feel like my time was wasted but doubt I'll remember it in a few years and wouldn't really recommend it to anyone.


I know I've come to use the term differently than it was intended, but I associate "pulp" with "potboiler" and to a lesser extent "airport fiction" - I don't mean it as a disrespectful description, but rather a phrase for a book that's great fun to read but has a fairly basic prose style and isn't imparting any great message, or at least not in any new or meaningful way. There are basically two different kinds of positive reading experience for me. One is the highbrow type which is full of heavy meaning and beautiful writing and leaves me with the feeling that I've experienced ~Great Literature~, and the other is a fun, enjoyable, page-turning adventure of some variety (maybe it's a space opera! maybe it's a creepy horror story!) that I can read even if I'm sitting on a plane in an unknown time zone with jet lag - exactly the kind of time I wouldn't have the patience for an MFA-style novel. And I guess even on an ordinary day, reading highbrow literature often feels like a chore, like exercising or eating healthily; I know I'll feel long-term benefits from it but I don't feel excited to sit down and read it in the evening.

Those two types aren't necessarily mutually exclusive, but it's rare to find one that does both. And of course it's all too common to find Serious Literature that sucks, and ostensibly fun lowbrow adventure stories that are actually really tedious.

'serious literature' doesn't necessarily have an overt meaning in the way you describe, and plenty of airport fiction type books are trying to be 'about' some particular topic. like what's the heavy meaning in a lot of Pavic for example? his work is far more about formal play than any strong theme or message. but really I don't see how any of this conflicts with the idea that pulp is mostly about whether something is lowbrow rather than any particular quality of the writing.

pradmer
Mar 31, 2009


Annihilation (Southern Reach #1) by Jeff VanderMeer - $2.99
https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00EGJ32A6/
Never read any VanderMeer. Worth picking up?

Wool (Silo #1) by Hugh Howey - $2.99
https://www.amazon.com/dp/B088SY4GSD/

The Loot (Charlie McCabe Thriller #1) by Craig Schaefer - $0.99
https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07L2V8GYW/

wizzardstaff
Apr 6, 2018



pradmer posted:

Wool (Silo #1) by Hugh Howey - $2.99
https://www.amazon.com/dp/B088SY4GSD/

I liked Wool. The series started to go increasingly off the rails as it went on, but it was satisfying post-apocalyptica that didn't involve roving biker gangs.

buffalo all day
Mar 13, 2019



pradmer posted:

Annihilation (Southern Reach #1) by Jeff VanderMeer - $2.99
https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00EGJ32A6/
Never read any VanderMeer. Worth picking up?


Itís one of my favorites, genuinely creepy and atmospheric and disturbing. The prose is pretty good, too. I donít want to say much more because itís worth going in blind. Itís not a long book though, and at that price itís worth it. The sequels are diminishing returns although if you played and liked the game Control you will probably like Authority (the first sequel).

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MockingQuantum
Jan 20, 2012




Gun Saliva

pradmer posted:

Wool (Silo #1) by Hugh Howey - $2.99
https://www.amazon.com/dp/B088SY4GSD/

just a heads up that Wool (and probably a few others in the series, I haven't checked in a while) is free on Prime Reading, if you're a Prime member

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