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DurianGray
Dec 23, 2010

King of Fruits


A little while back someone was asking about The Unbroken by C.L. Clark since they heard people liken it to Baru.

I just finished it the other day and can say that there are some broad similarities. The main character is a lady who likes ladies. She was taken from her home country by the Not-French empire and raised to be a disposable soldier with a bunch of other kidnapped kids. The main plot is about the impacts of imperialism and rebelling against it. There's also a secret rebel council and secret magic. One big difference is that it seems to be a queernormative universe, so it's not a big deal that a bunch of the main characters are gay/bi (even the Not-French princess who is also a POV character is casually bi).

It was a solid enough book but not the most amazing thing I've read recently. Some of the plot pacing felt a little uneven, kind of dragging in some parts and going a little too fast in others (basically just standard debut novel roughness). There's some interesting things going on with the worldbuilding that I wouldn't mind knowing more about, though. (There's a giant library in a cursed, abandoned city that gets mentioned a lot but they never actually get to go there so I'm sure it'll turn up in again. I'm a sucker for big fantasy libraries/archives.) It's the first in a series, but it also felt pretty wrapped up by the end at the same time, which I appreciated. I think if you wanted to treat it as a stand alone you totally could.

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Destroyenator
Dec 27, 2004
"Don't ask me lady, I live in beer"

team overhead smash posted:

Just googled this and sounds super cool. Please let me know how it reads.

I really enjoyed it. Very well written and the prose is almost poetic in sections. Itís all narrated by a storyteller giving you oral histories of different events or periods of the empire. Lots of well done vague world building where the narrator throws out stuff like ďand of course we all know what happened to the Blah dynastyĒ but not enough to tie any of the stories together in time or context.

Rianlee
Jan 15, 2009


Pillbug

StrixNebulosa posted:


Are there good cozy sci-fi novels? Ones with really optimistic themes and good characters doing good things?

Somehow Catherine Asaro's Skolian Empire came to mind when you asked this. I guess because the books have more of a romance bent than most sci-fi? Can't recall if it had optimistic themes, maybe put it in the back burner if you want something of that sort?

got some chores tonight
Feb 18, 2012

honk honk whats for lunch...


i recently finished a memory called empire and im surprised people are including it in the "cozy" genre

the central argument of the novel, to me at least, is that cultural hegemony is an inherently corrupting structure and nothing one individual does can overcome it as evidenced by how ambassador dzmare goes home at the end, which feels like one of those bummer truths we want to avoid when we read escapist fiction. compare the archetype cozy novel the long way to a small, angry planet (which i have not read in 6 years so i may not remember all the details correctly) which has a bunch of alien races from various socioeconomic classes help each other with their personal issues in celebration of multiculturalism to a memory called empire where two people who are essentially both humans realise they are from too different cultures (the in race and the out race) to ever truthfully love each other so they go back to their home planets

got some chores tonight
Feb 18, 2012

honk honk whats for lunch...


the tyrant baru cormorant is cozier than a memory called empire because the noble dying emperor who gracefully sacrifices him/herself to preserve their empire at least gets to live in the end of tyrant

Tars Tarkas
Apr 13, 2003


quantumfoam posted:

Please stop replying to the thread troll, thanks in advance.
LotR chat: Dennis L. McKiernan wrote a bunch of obvious (he says so while discussing the books) Tolkien knockoff books, however there is also a weird & bizarre & forgotten Russian continuation of the LotR series called 300 Years Later.
I thought this was The Last Ringbearer but it's actually the Ring of Darkness series by Nikolay Perumov, no idea yet if there is an english version but the synopsis I saw is lol so probably not worth the time

Liquid Communism
Mar 9, 2004


Out here, everything hurts.




Zore posted:

Long Way has 2 sequels that fit as well if you haven't read them. Final book in that universe is supposed to be coming out soon as well.

Later this month IIRC. Chambers has a new series starting this year as well, Monk & Robot.

freebooter
Jul 7, 2009

AUSTRALIA
NEEDS
TURNBULL


StrixNebulosa posted:

- Huh. The Golden Globe is in my uncle's collection and I don't have any emotions when I pick it up, so I might be clear to just read it. Thanks!

You're welcome It's a "sequel" in the very loosest sense of the word to Steel Beach, but it's basically just a shared universe and I didn't recommend SB because it definitely doesn't fit your definition - a much darker story about suicide and depression - and you don't need to have read it at all to enjoy TGG.

Toast King
Jun 22, 2007



Lipstick Apathy

It's not as intensely fantasy/sci-fi as a lot of books in here, but I just listened to the audiobook for Piranesi and man, what an incredible story. There's some books where I can just really visualise and picture everything perfectly, this was one of them for sure. The narrator does an amazing job as well and brings a great vibe to the character and cheery vibe/matter-of-factness in his descriptions about the House as well.

I've been looking for some good self-contained stories for a while and this fit in perfectly. I've just gotten through the first quarter or so of Borne by Jeff VanderMeer and it's hitting a lot of the same notes for me. Some books I feel like I can just see everything perfectly, in a way that doesn't always happen. I had similar feelings about Book of the New Sun which just felt like a weird surreal dream world the whole time. I really need to get back to that series some time too.

Gnoman
Feb 11, 2014

"What we therefore hath joined together, let Gnoman put asunder..."


StrixNebulosa posted:

May I interrupt? I'm literally sitting here minutes from bed scrolling through books in my kindle wanting some kind of comfort sci-fi. Not fantasy, but sci-fi. There's the thread favorite Murderbot, and Long Way to Angry Planet, but...what else? Bujold kind of fits, kind of doesn't, Cherryh's Foreigner's later books are definitely cozy, and I think it might be time to read more of James White's space hospital series, but it's never a bad time to ask:

Are there good cozy sci-fi novels? Ones with really optimistic themes and good characters doing good things?

Little late, but Mike Resnik's Santiago might fit the bill. A fair bit of the story is about "bad" characters realizing they're much better than they realize.

Cardiac
Aug 28, 2012



uber_stoat posted:

finally got rid of 'em, god bless. ever thus to an-cap pedophiles.

lmao

edit: anyway bout to start in on this



I am halfway through and while it is good, I keep thinking there is nothing new with the format. Reads more like a classic fable or thousand and one night story.

Invalid Validation
Jan 13, 2008

DON'T DOUBLE DOWN ON YOUR STUPID SHIT JUST CAUSE YOU THINK IT'S FUNNY. YOU MAKE STUPID FUCKING DECISIONS ALL THE TIME THEN DOUBLE DOWN LIKE A PETULANT CHILD. GOD I FUCKING HATE YOU SO MUCH SOMETIMES.

One of my favorite trilogies is The Coldfire Trilogy and I need new books to read. Any suggestions?

Jaxyon
Mar 6, 2016
Probation
Can't post for 4 hours!


Invalid Validation posted:

One of my favorite trilogies is The Coldfire Trilogy and I need new books to read. Any suggestions?

It's been a long time since I read her stuff but I remember that trilogy being a bit hard to replicate because it's one of the classic examples of a series that straddles scifi and fantasy.

The Goodreads "also liked" list isn't much help because it's basically a list of fantasy from the same era.

Invalid Validation
Jan 13, 2008

DON'T DOUBLE DOWN ON YOUR STUPID SHIT JUST CAUSE YOU THINK IT'S FUNNY. YOU MAKE STUPID FUCKING DECISIONS ALL THE TIME THEN DOUBLE DOWN LIKE A PETULANT CHILD. GOD I FUCKING HATE YOU SO MUCH SOMETIMES.

Guess Iím looking for something more that tone but newer? Fantasy preferred.

shirunei
Sep 7, 2018

I tried to run away. To take the easy way out. I'll live through the suffering. When I die, I want to feel like I did my best.

Invalid Validation posted:

Guess Iím looking for something more that tone but newer? Fantasy preferred.

A Land Fit for Heroes, the trilogy by Richard K. Morgan might work

branedotorg
Jun 19, 2009


Phobeste posted:

This is ironically a very apropos thing to associate with the Alex Benedict novels

Especially the first one.

I can never remember which ones are Alex Benedict & Chase and which ones are Pricilla Hutch ones.

They're all pretty good in a low stakes space detective way

StrixNebulosa
Feb 14, 2012

You cheated not only the game, but yourself.
But most of all, you cheated BABA


Invalid Validation posted:

One of my favorite trilogies is The Coldfire Trilogy and I need new books to read. Any suggestions?

Have you read her other stuff? This Alien Shore is one of my favorite books.

tildes
Nov 15, 2018


Toast King posted:

It's not as intensely fantasy/sci-fi as a lot of books in here, but I just listened to the audiobook for Piranesi and man, what an incredible story. There's some books where I can just really visualise and picture everything perfectly, this was one of them for sure. The narrator does an amazing job as well and brings a great vibe to the character and cheery vibe/matter-of-factness in his descriptions about the House as well.

Yeah, I also really loved the book/audiobook! Normally never listen on audio book but I really liked it for this one. I think the other thing which makes it incredible how well you can visualize it is how bizarre the setting is - nonetheless I feel like I came away with a really clear picture.

E: also i have now read a few more of the nebula books and I feel like Piranesi must be a favorite from that list. I realize though, Iím not like a professional author or critic or other designated good taste person, so maybe my opinions are idiosyncratic? Curious what others felt. At least for me:

Piranesi - instant classic imo

The City We Became- i really like NK Jemisin in general, but couldnít finish this. Maybe I just need to give it another shot. It seems like I might be in the minority in this opinion though? Maybe this would be the one to bet on if any other book were to win?

Black Sun- itís a good book for sure, but itís just not on the same level. Definitely executes a story pretty well in a cool world, but didnít feel ďbest book of the yearĒ exceptional.

Network Effect- a very good book, but I didnít feel it was quite on the level of Piranesi (or some of the other Murderbot stuff) for me. It felt a bit stretched out at points. Granted, I still really loved it.

The Midnight Bargain- sort of like Black Sun for me- good, but not ďwin out over all these other booksĒ good. Also a did not finish for me, though I probably will at some point.

Mexican Gothic I havenít read, so no idea there.

Also surprised the third Baru book wasnít nominated. I guess these things are pretty random, but it seems like a clear choice to me over at least 2-3 of the other books on the list, and competitive with basically any of them.

tildes fucked around with this message at 19:06 on Apr 9, 2021

DACK FAYDEN
Feb 25, 2013

Bear Witness

The Folding Knife by K.J. Parker is on sale for $1.99
https://smile.amazon.com/Folding-Knife-K-J-Parker-ebook/dp/B0035IICZO

it's really good even if it does have one of the typical KJP sad endings, ish

ClydeFrog
Apr 13, 2007

Jesus Suffering Fuck how can running for 3 minutes BE SO HARD.

From Darkest Skies

This has been instantly enjoyable and I'm pretty gleeful that the next two parts are written and waiting.

Harold Fjord
Jan 3, 2004
Probation
Can't post for 6 hours!


Picked up Two of Swords based on the excerpt and I just can't put down. So many shady plots!

Ccs
Feb 25, 2011




Yeah it might be the strongest of Parker's longer series I've read. I'm glad he was able to make the serialized format work. Gradually funneling the reader between characters gave vast scope to the conflict, and choosing to focus on one character in the last third prevented things from getting to disparate. And while parts felt aimless, there was never the overriding sense of "where is this going?" that I've felt while trying to read his other long series like Scavenger.

packetmantis
Feb 26, 2013

oh ar


StrixNebulosa posted:

- Greatship: uh, is this the Marrow by Robert Reed? What book is this!

Yes, sorry, my bad! Marrow is IIRC the first one chronologically but they skip around a lot and it doesn't really matter what order you read them in. There's also The Greatship, The Well of Stars, A Memory of Sky, and a million loving short stories that I wish he'd put in a collection or something.

A Proper Uppercut
Sep 30, 2008



I just finished up Curse of Chalion. Book good. Every Saturday I go to breakfast by myself and I happened to finish it while I was there. The ending was surprisingly happy and made me tear up in the middle of the restaurant.

SSJ_naruto_2003
Oct 12, 2012





General Battuta posted:

Are you a Shivan superjuggernaught named Naruto

I was namechanged in one of the gbs 'post here to have your name changed' threads years ago.

cptn_dr
Sep 7, 2011

Seven for beauty that blossoms and dies



tildes posted:

E: also i have now read a few more of the nebula books and I feel like Piranesi must be a favorite from that list. I realize though, I’m not like a professional author or critic or other designated good taste person, so maybe my opinions are idiosyncratic? Curious what others felt. At least for me:



I think Piranesi is easily the best. Of the others I've read, I'm with you—they're fine, but are up against a new classic of the genre.

StrixNebulosa
Feb 14, 2012

You cheated not only the game, but yourself.
But most of all, you cheated BABA


packetmantis posted:

Yes, sorry, my bad! Marrow is IIRC the first one chronologically but they skip around a lot and it doesn't really matter what order you read them in. There's also The Greatship, The Well of Stars, A Memory of Sky, and a million loving short stories that I wish he'd put in a collection or something.

I'll have a look at them, thank you!

PawParole
Nov 16, 2019





i havent had any luck when i asked last year, but has anyone here read any good Generation ships or interstellar colony novels in the last year?

team overhead smash
Sep 2, 2006

Team-Forest-Tree-Dog:
Smashing your way into our hearts one skylight at a time

PawParole posted:

i havent had any luck when i asked last year, but has anyone here read any good Generation ships or interstellar colony novels in the last year?

Children of Ruin is half generation ship half the development of alien intelligence on the destination planet.

Tau Zero was okay and a bit dated but I enjoyed how absurd the time lag got.

Freeze Frame Revolution is decent and has a different premise as people try and rebel against their AI overlord despite spending 99.999% of their time in cryo.

Junkenstein
Oct 22, 2003



PawParole posted:

i havent had any luck when i asked last year, but has anyone here read any good Generation ships or interstellar colony novels in the last year?

What have you already read?

There's Aurora, obviously.

Chasm City and On the Steel Breeze by Alastair Reynolds have large parts of each set on generation ships.

tiniestacorn
Oct 3, 2015



PawParole posted:

i havent had any luck when i asked last year, but has anyone here read any good Generation ships or interstellar colony novels in the last year?

An Unkindness of Ghosts by Rivers Solomon. It's literary science fiction, though, so if you're looking for a hard science fiction treatment of generation ships, it probably won't be for you.

tiniestacorn fucked around with this message at 20:27 on Apr 10, 2021

Teddybear
May 16, 2009

Look! A teddybear doll!
It's soooo cute!



Iíve smashed my face against To Sleep in a Sea of Stars a couple times now and Iíve bounced off. Iím like 150 pages in and looking at the little progress marker going 17% and I just absolutely cannot see that through.

Aardvark!
Mar 3, 2002



Teddybear posted:

I’ve smashed my face against To Sleep in a Sea of Stars a couple times now and I’ve bounced off. I’m like 150 pages in and looking at the little progress marker going 17% and I just absolutely cannot see that through.

I made it to 63%, personally. First book I've ever quit over halfway through. The second one was NOS4A2

Llamadeus
Dec 20, 2005


Isn't that writer known only for an exceptionally derivative and poorly written fantasy series anyway? Doesn't seem like something worth the effort

Boody
Aug 15, 2001


Anyone own any Folio Society books?

Saw the PKD short story collection yesterday just before it sold out and had to purchase it. https://www.foliosociety.com/uk/the-complete-short-stories.html

ToxicFrog
Apr 26, 2008




StrixNebulosa posted:

Waking up to lots of recs is my favorite, thank you!!!

- On A Sunbeam: eyyy something free to look at, thanks!

If comics are in scope, also check out Always Human.

Some of the stories in We're The Weird Aliens would qualify, but it's a short story anthology and the unifying theme is "humans are weird" rather than "humans are cozy", so sometimes it's like, human introduces alien explorer to the joys of curry, and sometimes it's more like human kills an entire shipful of space pirates bare-handed. It's a mixed bag, is what I'm saying, and I haven't read it recently enough to recommend specific stories.

Invalid Validation posted:

One of my favorite trilogies is The Coldfire Trilogy and I need new books to read. Any suggestions?

The obvious recommendation is more of CSF's stuff. The Magister series has a lot of thematic parallels with Coldfire but is its own thing otherwise. Her SF work This Alien Shore, The Madness Season, and In Conquest Born are all good (although I'd skip The Wilding, the sequel Conquest absolutely did not need).

For other authors, I'd consider The Legend of Eli Monpress by Rachel Aaron, Stories of the Raksura by Martha Wells, Dragonoak by Sam Farren, and Rogues of the Republic by Patrick Weekes to all be at least vibe-adjacent, although none of them share Coldfire's "fantasy setting with SF backstory" element.

Ornamented Death
Jan 25, 2006

Pew pew!



Boody posted:

Anyone own any Folio Society books?

Saw the PKD short story collection yesterday just before it sold out and had to purchase it. https://www.foliosociety.com/uk/the-complete-short-stories.html

I own a number of individual titles and sets from Folio. I saw the PKD set, but I'm not a big enough fan of his work to justify the cost.

uber_stoat
Jan 21, 2001





Pillbug

that Folio Dune calls to me. dare i heed the call.

StrixNebulosa
Feb 14, 2012

You cheated not only the game, but yourself.
But most of all, you cheated BABA


https://twitter.com/jasonsanford/status/1380880918978658304

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Ornamented Death
Jan 25, 2006

Pew pew!



uber_stoat posted:

that Folio Dune calls to me. dare i heed the call.

That's one I have. It is absolutely gorgeous in person.

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