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Doctor Jeep
Dec 30, 2008



MockingQuantum posted:

Have you read The Boy on the Bridge? I was actually kind of lukewarm on Girl for most of the book, but ended up enjoying it well enough, so I'm curious how the second book stands up.

And anybody read Fellside or Someone Like Me? I generally like, but not love, Mike Carey's books so I'm curious about them, but not enough to just dive in without a recommendation.

boy - very good
fellside - very good
someone like me - just ok

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Doctor Jeep
Dec 30, 2008



Look Sir Droids posted:

Just finished Children of Time and have not read this thread at all, so going way back for this quote reply.

The spiders did win. They had humanity on its knees and could have killed them all. Iím still mulling over the ending, but itís arguable the spiders enslaved humans just as they enslaved ants. The last few pages did a bit to soften that and true mutual acceptance is consistent with the theme. But itís not necessarily as pat as the author (I think?) wants it to be.

How is the sequel? Iíve seen mixed reviews.

IIRC it's specifically said that the spiders implanted into humans the same virus/whatever that the humans implanted into them, which gave them a concept of "this being is like me maybe I won't kill it", while they domesticated (enslaved?) the ants not through messing with their dna but through figuring out how their pheromones worked and manipulating their perception that way

Doctor Jeep
Dec 30, 2008



TheAardvark posted:

Question about Foreigner:

who does Bren actually shoot at the beginning? I can't tell if I'm having massive brain fart, or if it's never confirmed.

iirc the conservatives who ilsidi is grouped with at the time got spooked by what you find out at the end (dunno if you've finished the book so i won't spoil it) and sent an asassin to merk him

Doctor Jeep
Dec 30, 2008



freebooter posted:

If I said to you I'd just read a book involving:

- a post-apocalyptic world which centuries later has developed into a new generic-fantasy-level-of-tech society
- A centuries-old cybernetic super-soldier from the past era
- Ancient orbital weapons being reawakened

What would you think it's ripping off? I just read a fairly obscure book which strongly reminded me of something else, but maybe these are fairly common tropes?

sounds like the steerswoman series except for 2

Doctor Jeep
Dec 30, 2008



pradmer posted:

Willful Child by Steven Erickson - $2.99
https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00ILY5BY2/
Heard it described as a comedy parody of star trek. Seems strange from the Malazan guy.

84K by Claire North - $2.99
https://www.amazon.com/dp/B06Y178M4C/
I really liked her other book The First Fifteen Lives of Harry August, but I haven't heard anything about this one.

Sixteen Ways to Defend a Walled City by KJ Parker - $2.99
https://www.amazon.com/dp/B078W5M7DB

Basically I know the authors but nothing about these books. Anyone willing to give a recommendation?

16 ways is good, but I'm a KJ Parker fan so anything in his style would be fine by me. ymmv.

Doctor Jeep
Dec 30, 2008



High Warlord Zog posted:

Robin Hobb would like a word

and the word is PAIN

Doctor Jeep
Dec 30, 2008



biracial bear for uncut posted:

-it would be weird for the child of a polyamorous marriage to call Murderbot what she called Murderbot, if Murderbot didn't have at least enough feminine appearance traits for her to think that was ok. Unless the author slipped here and the kid is a sexist and it was meant to insult rather than compliment (the way it read).

"what are you, my mother?" is a usual saying in english, so it's got nothing to do with sexism

Doctor Jeep
Dec 30, 2008



biracial bear for uncut posted:

"Okay, third mom" is not.

there's another phrase - "alright, mother" - used in the same way

Doctor Jeep
Dec 30, 2008



Poldarn posted:

giving me the impression that the world is incredibly old, history is caught in cycles, and things just repeat.

it is, that's the thing with parker's main world, the various series and standalone novels happen in different eras

Doctor Jeep
Dec 30, 2008



mewse posted:

I think Ernest Cline might be a straight up moron. I just came across this section in Armada where he tries to explain to the reader what "gallows humor" is:

lmao this is terrible

Doctor Jeep
Dec 30, 2008



Xenix posted:

It seems to be an unpopular opinion here, but I regret wasting my time on Malazan. I found they were interesting through The Bonehunters (with the exception of Midnight Tides which was bearable but not great) then dropped off precipitously in terms of being enjoyable. The last 2 books were nothing but a bore with a terrible payoff. Virtually every non-Bridgeburner/Bonehunter story threads end without having any bearing on the main thrust of the series in the most limp-dicked manner. I didn't expect everything to be tied up neatly in a bow, but goddamn, talk about a disappointment.

agreed, only I'd add reaper's gale to the interesting ones

Doctor Jeep
Dec 30, 2008



Ccs posted:

Has anyone read The Angel of the Crows? I enjoyed the author's other book, The Goblin Emperor, a lot, but I'm seeing a lot of 2 and 3 star reviews on Goodreads for this one...

it's fine, I guess, but don't expect much more than sherlock holmes fantasy fanfic

Doctor Jeep
Dec 30, 2008



hard r fantasy

Doctor Jeep
Dec 30, 2008



Yoked posted:

How is the Inheritance Trilogy for someone who hasnít read Jemisin yet?

too romancey for me, characters I didn't really care about
the dreamblood duology is her best work imo

Doctor Jeep
Dec 30, 2008



Ccs posted:

I finished KJ Parker's "The Folding Knife" which I picked up on sale. I've read a previous book of his, Sharps, but had no memory of it other than it had a fencing competition. Reading this one, I recognized a few names of the countries, so they seem to be in the same world.

Yeesh, it's a grim book at the end. I've heard Parker's works compared to Abercrombie, but Abercrombie spreads the grimness around. Characters are dying or facing bad turns or start off in a bad place from the beginning. Basso in "Knife" has one very bad thing happen to him near the beginning of the book, and then things seem to go swimmingly for him after that. There are attempts on his life and threats of bankruptcy and a number of political challenges but with incredible luck and ability he triumphs over all of it. And there's not a sense that any of these things was a real threat to him. The tension is kept by periodic intrusions of his sister into his life. She is bent on destroying him because of the bad thing that happened near the beginning. So in among Basso's numerous accomplishments, the reader is always thinking "So when is the other shoe going to drop and the sister finally get her revenge?"

Then Parker orchestrates a very tight conclusion that undoes all of Basso's accomplishments. His business and city-state face ruin, but it seems to come out of nowhere, the freak accident of a plague. Then, once he's on his way out of the city, it's revealed his immigrant wife was behind this final failing, and that her antipathy toward her countrymen disguised a deeper desire to have it not taken over by Basso's imperial ambitions. The sister never orchestrates a revenge, and has her son taken from her as a result of this wife's plot.

Part of the source of the grimness in Abercrombie's world is due to immortal wizards that control things, keep the people down, and prevent positive change. The grimness in Parker's world seems to stem from a much more nebulous place, the general ignorance of another person's thoughts and motives. The idea that we don't even know our own reasons for doing something, to the point that positive changes can result from pure self interest as opposed to noble goals and rampant death can happen because a simpler solution just didn't occur to the orchestrator. The ending is so monstrous in how things come apart that it makes me pine for the worlds where the wizards are behind it all.

In fact, to go even further into the Abercrombie comparison, Basso is like Bayaz but if this were the real world. He's exceedingly competent at statecraft and finance, but that can't save him. The world is too complex.

nicely put, parker is one of my favorites but I admit he's a very cynical bastard

Doctor Jeep
Dec 30, 2008



Groke posted:

His stated reason for choosing "Parker": It is a pen name.

Doctor Jeep
Dec 30, 2008



Ben Nevis posted:

Thief by Margaret Whalen Turner - The longest book of these at 270 pages, this was surprisingly good. I didn't know much about it. It's about a thief who is taken out of jail to steal an important artifact which will help determine the fate of 3 neighboring kingdoms. Solid all round, and generally pretty interesting too. I'll probably pick up the sequel.

the sequels are much better than the first one, IMO

Doctor Jeep
Dec 30, 2008



a baru in three parts

Doctor Jeep
Dec 30, 2008



a foolish pianist posted:

The weird thing about that piece is how he says the cover will attract men in a certain age range, as if he thinks that photo is actually sexy in some capacity, as opposed to being a hideous circa-1991 CGI tech demo that's somehow from loving 2008.

there are loads of people melting down because their pixellated waifus' cleavages have been covered up a bit
also, I'd say that the problem is also that the cover will repel more people than it will attract

Doctor Jeep
Dec 30, 2008



Ccs posted:

I finished The Two of Swords Volume 3. Wow, for a K.J. Parker series that was positively lighthearted. Mass death occurred, sure, but a couple of the characters arenít completely miserable!

there's even a happy ending

Doctor Jeep
Dec 30, 2008



Remulak posted:

Considering they one-upped not just Thanos in death but also Pol Pot in creating a Year Zero. And hitler in a leibestraum creation, repopulated by literal slaves.

I forgot to add "for a kj parker novel" at the end, of course

Doctor Jeep
Dec 30, 2008



Jedit posted:

I read the Night Watch books after watching the first movie, and I enjoyed them more than the movie - which I enjoyed a lot. Worth noting that this is the first Night Watch collection, though; there is a second trilogy containing Last Watch, New Watch and Sixth Watch. Lukyanenko is also reportedly writing a seventh volume titled The Eternal Watch.

whoever like this "forces of dark and light battle in the mundane world" type of thing should check out carnivale (tv show)

Doctor Jeep
Dec 30, 2008



Ccs posted:

I just started RJ. Barkers Age of Assassins cause it was recommended around online and it was on sale for $3. Man, this is a come down after reading a bunch of KJ Parker (hey these authors names even rhyme). The prose is competent enough and the protagonist is a bit witty but it feels like Iíve fallen straight back into run of the mill fantasy. When I used to go to Barnes and Nobles the majority of the fantasy book covers were men in cloaks. Itís been about 6-7 years since Iíve lived in a place with a B&N so maybe thatís changed, but the cover of this book is... a man in a cloak. And from the first two chapters that seems fitting somehow.

Oh well, it might still make for a fun story, weíll see.

I haven't read that series but have read the 2 books so far in barker's the bone ships series and they're exactly as you say - run of the mill fantasy
not cringy (and it's sad that this is a quality in the genre LOL) but nothing special

Doctor Jeep
Dec 30, 2008



Ccs posted:

Is Robin Hobbís much lauded trilogy about an assassin any better? Or distinct from run of the mill fantasy? I see a lot of praise for her work, to the point that some will say sheís the best author in the genre, but I havenít read any since they rarely go on sale.

I liked it immensely when I first read it but a reread lowered the high marks, Fitz is a poo poo magnet. The Tawny Man trilogy is better IMO, but you need to read the Assassin trilogy first to know wtf is going on. The third Fitz trilogy didn't do anything for me, neither did the Rain Wilds series and the Soldier Son trilogy. Liveship Traders is good, I remember enjoying that.

Doctor Jeep
Dec 30, 2008



StrixNebulosa posted:

Can you elaborate on the spoiler in more spoilers? I haven't read the trilogy but I've thought about it for years.

His girlfriend/love of his life (Molly) marries his surrogate father (Burrich) who raised him to revile his own wild magic, which the surrogate father also has but hates in himself as well.

Doctor Jeep
Dec 30, 2008



Ccs posted:

Yeah I've heard people refer to his system as fantasy legos. He reuses the same places, same religion (Invincible Sun) and similar Greek/Byzantine names but without them actually all being a part of the same fantasy world. In some stories the Studium is a guild of wizards, in others its just a type of University. What's referred to as the City changes based on the book and what characters think of as The City.

i think it's because his novels and series can be separated by a thousand years so it's conceivable that the studium could become a university in that kind of timeframe or even that it's not the same studium that was mentioned before but something new which kept the name
same goes for "the city", there's always "a city", like today it's "new york" or at least that's the city I think about as "the city" (and i'm not even american)
it used to be london, before that maybe paris, before that rome or constantinople etc.

Doctor Jeep
Dec 30, 2008



as far as martha wells goes, I would say this is my ranking of her work:
ile-rien > murderbot >>>>> raksura > standalones

Doctor Jeep
Dec 30, 2008



How tf is that legal

Doctor Jeep
Dec 30, 2008



xiw posted:

hoping this is another Tom Holt alias, this time wearing a dog mask

not even close

Doctor Jeep
Dec 30, 2008



BurningBeard posted:

I'm just about to finish The Company by Parker and holy jeez these are some awful people. Where's the next place to go with Parker. I know there's some big fans in this thread.the only other one I tried was the first in the Scavenger trilogy or something? Protagonist with amnesia. Loved the style, didn't care for the plot.

I didn't like the scavenger and the fencer series, but the rest was great, he's one of my favorite fantasy authors.

Doctor Jeep
Dec 30, 2008



Fried Sushi posted:

some brilliant writing

The simple inscription on the base of Saevusí statue reads: He saw the worth of every man. We shall not look upon his like again.

Doctor Jeep
Dec 30, 2008



eke out posted:

jesus christ it took me way too long even after GB mentioned it was a pun

what's the pun? ESL here and usually I suss out wordplay but this one is a headscratcher. I'm sure it'll be obvious in hindsight.

Doctor Jeep
Dec 30, 2008



General Battuta posted:

Change the K to a C

that's it? it was the first thing I thought of but it felt too simple. lmao

Doctor Jeep
Dec 30, 2008



Junkenstein posted:

Anyone read the new Adrian Tchaikovsky? Sounds like a straight up slice of space opera, which I could really go for right now.

it's not slice of life, first book of a series
standard enjoyable AT

Doctor Jeep
Dec 30, 2008



John Lee posted:

I remember when I found that out, and it really recontextualized the scene in one of the Myth Adventures books where an important character goes on a nearly-unprompted rant about how it's every citizen's right, nay, duty to cheat the IRS as much as possible.

lol, it's not mycrimes.txt but "My Crimes - A Novel"

Doctor Jeep
Dec 30, 2008



fritz posted:

She's got some short stories in that setting also.

And they're all good, I like the setting more than the Ancillary universe

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Doctor Jeep
Dec 30, 2008



i liked it because it had these very different species, some of whom are big enemies in the rest of the universe, living together and actually being a community
most of the time in sf the species are very segregated, which is logical since they have their own planets etc. so this was a nice change of pace

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