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rjmccall
Sep 7, 2007

no worries friend

Fun Shoe

also taxing illiquid wealth has a simple solution, you just put a lien on it for when it actually becomes sellable. if its value drops in the intervening time, fine, adjust it down. if it needs to get transferred for some other reason (death) then you just force it to be liquidated if nobody can pay the lien

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rjmccall
Sep 7, 2007

no worries friend

Fun Shoe

Captain Foo posted:

What's all this about wealth taxes being unconstitutional

the us constitution limits the sorts of taxes the federal government can impose in article i, section 9, clause 4: No Capitation, or other direct, Tax shall be laid, unless in Proportion to the Census or Enumeration herein before directed to be taken.

that was modified by the sixteenth amendment: The Congress shall have power to lay and collect taxes on incomes, from whatever source derived, without apportionment among the several States, and without regard to any census or enumeration.

taxes are considered direct if they're laid on people or property rather than transactions. there are scholars who think that the amendment was unnecessary, i think on the principle that income counts as a taxable transaction. that's the rule that allows inheritance taxes. but i don't see how you can stretch that to cover wealth; i'm in favor of a wealth tax, but i do think it probably needs an amendment. unless you can find a way to restrict it to be proportional to state population

rjmccall
Sep 7, 2007

no worries friend

Fun Shoe

sardines are actually very low in mercury, probably not to the point that it’s okay to eat 10+ cans a week, but still much better than most other fish

unfortunately they’re super high in cholesterol so between the sardines and the cup of cottage cheese a day that dude is maxing out the recommended limit of something that ideally you eat as little of as possible

rjmccall
Sep 7, 2007

no worries friend

Fun Shoe

my ptrauth paper got linked on hn so let's see what the hackers have to say

quote:

Nope. ptrauth needs a good hash in Hardware. There's only crc32c, aes, sha1 (-160) and sha256 (i.e. sha2-256). Of these crc32c is entirely insecure, aes not applicable, so we are left with AMD, Intel laptops (Goldmont), armv8 and Power8. For sure we don't care about any SHA vulnerabilities here, only about speed.
Blake2 is about a factor of 1000 slower. Secure hashes are not really applicable for pointer hashing (i.e. 48bit). Some need 16byte alignment (but you can use a stack word for that), some need excessive padding. Here the padding will kill you.

quote:

If you don't use the standard library, and you don't need JIT, you can simply not use pointers to callbacks. You can still have something like qsort() but you need to have statically defined:
typedef void*(*callback)(...);extern const callback callbacks[256];
and qsort() takes an index instead of a raw pointer to a callback. "Validating" a callback is cheap: Just make sure it's <256 (how many do you need anyway?). If you don't do an unchecked call* or a jmp* then you don't have anything an attacker can exploit, and I find it hard to believe a cached load is going to be slower than something like this.

quote:

Is it technically possible to design a MMU that prevents a process reading or writing to a region of memory that don't belong to it?

quote:

Wow. Incredible to see the new heights of complexity that the von Neumann architecture has led to. Corruption of data leading to corruption of control leading to control flow guarantees through the addition of cryptography. Wow.

rjmccall
Sep 7, 2007

no worries friend

Fun Shoe

JawnV6 posted:

wait who's still bitter about harvard architectures

that one is my favorite. it doesn't even make sense, it's not like harvard architectures just don't have function pointers or return addresses

now there are architectures that put return addresses in a separate stack which iiuc can't be directly addressed, but that's strictly a rop protection, and it's not like every harvard architecture does that

rjmccall
Sep 7, 2007

no worries friend

Fun Shoe

do the mill fans talk big about von neumann? i've never looked into it, since fifteen years on they're still vaporware, but it looks like they still have a unified address space and it's just return addresses that are isolated in non-addressable memory

rjmccall
Sep 7, 2007

no worries friend

Fun Shoe

i'm just intrigued by the idea that there might still be mill fans after all these years of nothing. like they could absolutely have made some prototype chips by this point if their design was worth anything

i love some of the mill talking points, like they use a generic instruction encoding and it's just the interpretation of the bits in those encodings that varies between models so somehow the programming model is easier, for all the programmers who are keying in their assembly programs with the front switches and don't mind rewriting for a completely different isa as long as they don't have to write out where the operands go on a new piece of masking tape

rjmccall
Sep 7, 2007

no worries friend

Fun Shoe

lol they're writing their own os instead of just porting linux or maybe some tiny embedded kernel? yeah that fits

rjmccall
Sep 7, 2007

no worries friend

Fun Shoe

i mean there’s a pretty deep divide on that, but yeah, the idea that of course all feminists are opposed to sex work is pretty funny

also obligatory “that’s not how alphas work”

rjmccall
Sep 7, 2007

no worries friend

Fun Shoe

city consolidation makes sense in the abstract but i fault exactly no-one for not wanting anything to do with sf’s extremely hosed up local politics

rjmccall
Sep 7, 2007

no worries friend

Fun Shoe

sf is basically the center of the state democratic machine, so it’s actually really out-sized in its importance in state politics, and serving in city office is a pretty good stepping stone, not a dead end. it doesn’t help; you just get ambitious councillors who immediately start running for state senator and laying out their own ten-point plans for fixing everything just to get good press instead of trying to build any sort of real support from the other councillors

rjmccall
Sep 7, 2007

no worries friend

Fun Shoe

eh, on the grand fraud-crank-optimist spectrum i’d probably put mill somewhere between the latter two. there’s a ton of ideas there, and some of them seem really dumb to me (vliw) and others could be the right trade-off for some client out there (the belt maybe?). as a sort of patent-oriented architecture research group they have some potential to get picked up for their ip, and they don’t need a working product for that, so it’s not total investor storytime

rjmccall
Sep 7, 2007

no worries friend

Fun Shoe

yeah i think vliw might make sense if you have a pretty small instruction set and a very particular execution model like a gpu where control flow is really uncommon. it’s really dumb for general-purpose computing and i really don’t understand the allure for architects

rjmccall
Sep 7, 2007

no worries friend

Fun Shoe

seeing an actual doctor is overkill for the vast majority of checkups/visits, which is why those things are already usually handled by nurses, and a doctor maybe waves at you if you’re old and insist on it

a programmer could do a great job of diagnosing a cold when that’s all the patient has. so could a donut with “you have a cold” written on it in sprinkles. the point of seeing an actual medical practitioner is that occasionally it’s not the correct diagnosis

rjmccall
Sep 7, 2007

no worries friend

Fun Shoe

so, i’m not going to scour hn to find that doctor/lawyer post, but: on second read, that post is almost certainly an argument by absurd analogy, i.e. it is trying to make the point that it is silly to think that trained programmers are unnecessary just because some of what they do is rote. it’s just in the context of hn that it’s confusable for “actually these other professions are trivial”

rjmccall
Sep 7, 2007

no worries friend

Fun Shoe

a lot of journalism does have a pro-establishment bias

roughly all journalism has a pro-sensationalism bias

having a finely-tuned balance of panic and despair does not mean you are a sophisticated media consumer, it means you read very specific things

rjmccall
Sep 7, 2007

no worries friend

Fun Shoe

most of the stuff in this thread is not deserving of moderation. it’s embarrassing to the author, or should be, but it’s not offensive or combative or detrimental to the community except in a “gosh this community sure has a lot of idiots in it” sort of way

rjmccall
Sep 7, 2007

no worries friend

Fun Shoe

crazypenguin posted:

I mean, that's detrimental to the community as anyone with sense decides "ew" and then avoids it

yeah maybe but if you ban people for being wrong you won't have a community either

rjmccall
Sep 7, 2007

no worries friend

Fun Shoe

it really doesn't look like it'll be that long, but i'm sure the poor and disadvantaged will get incredibly hosed over anyway

rjmccall
Sep 7, 2007

no worries friend

Fun Shoe

Mr.Radar posted:

zerm778 10 hours ago [-]

Patreon became successful mostly because of the girls charging money for their nudes. Then they've started to ban these girls because they wanted a clean platform. Guess what, these girls have now moved to onlyfans and they won't come back. Patreon has lost the money bringing members thinking that failed musicians/youtubers would bring them the big bucks.

reply

i've definitely heard this from sex workers before. every "you can advertise and people can pay you" site ends up building their user base in large part based on sex work and then eventually kicking it off so that they can go mainstream

rjmccall
Sep 7, 2007

no worries friend

Fun Shoe

it’s particularly important that people recognize that the amount of thought and effort that i put into things is the right amount, while any greater consideration or research probably indicates some sort of mental disease

rjmccall
Sep 7, 2007

no worries friend

Fun Shoe

on the one hand, lmao at the “golden egg” of hn being in any way comparable to the value of one of their actual companies

on the other hand, lmao at the idea that hn censoring comments for financial advantage would trigger some sort of massive user revolt

anyway the real reason they wouldn’t bother is just the streisand effect

rjmccall
Sep 7, 2007

no worries friend

Fun Shoe

i was chuckling at his technical description of buffer overflows and then remembered that in 2001 there really still were a lot of operating systems with poo poo like executable stacks, so it’s only 95% hilariously wrong

rjmccall
Sep 7, 2007

no worries friend

Fun Shoe

Best Bi Geek Squid posted:

holy poo poo what's wrong with people

too much self-centering, not enough mindful action

or in mtg terms (checks) too much black, not enough whi... uh maybe let's go back to tarot

rjmccall
Sep 7, 2007

no worries friend

Fun Shoe

quote:

White puts value in the group, the community, and its civilization as a whole. White's ultimate goal is peace — a world where there is no unnecessary suffering, a world where life is as good as it can be for each individual, a world where everyone gets along and no one seeks to disturb the bonds of unity that White had worked so long to forge. A White organization may believe in order and ethics, enforcing its beliefs through government, religion, and other large-scale institutions. However, a White individual may mirror this on a smaller scale, such as preferring their family eat together at the dinner table, putting value in dining etiquette and proper manners. An organized character is not automatically White. A character that values organization, however, may be. If the character spends a great deal of time around Black characters, they will likely do some things that can be considered selfish or outright Black. This does not make them Black, as they may have been suffering under peer pressure, they may have lost or may be losing sight of morality, they may not be entirely aware of what they're doing, or they could perhaps be in the process of reconsidering their own views and making a shift into or toward the color. Black characters will do anything to ensure their own well-being even at the expense of others; to black, anything less only allows others to do the same. Thus, black does everything possible to gain the only commodity that can secure it from weakness — power.

i can see the attraction of this philosophy, to some

rjmccall
Sep 7, 2007

no worries friend

Fun Shoe

humans exhale about 800 pounds of carbon a year, and the average hardwood tree growing outdoors in good light absorbs about 50, so i guess it depends on your house plants

rjmccall
Sep 7, 2007

no worries friend

Fun Shoe

alexandriao posted:

I remember reading a stack exchange about a human's chance of survivial in a sealed room of (I don't remember the dimensions) with plants inside, and someone did the math and it worked out at few days even without the plants, and then they went further and calculated the amount of plants needed to replenish, but that was maybe 3 years ago and I don't remember enough unique keywords to dig it up, sigh.

i think it varies a lot based on light; if those plants aren’t under basically grow lights then they reach an equilibrium where they respire as much co2 as they take in during photosynthesis . i don’t know how much that changes based on co2 concentration

carry on then posted:

oh no another oil spill, oh well

oil spills are much better for atmospheric co2 than actually using the oil :science:

mrmcd posted:

All the carbon you exhale from metabolism comes from plants or animals that ate plants so it's already carbon neutral aaaaaaaugh this argument is so stupid why am I wasting my life.

happy to help

rjmccall
Sep 7, 2007

no worries friend

Fun Shoe

yeah, the pointer authentication spec/whitepaper got posted to hn and i felt obliged to sign up and answer questions in case there was anything good. obviously there wasn’t, because hn is 60% javascript developers who think they’re brilliant hackers and 40% moribund old farts who think they’re way too cool for hn but do spend an awful lot of time there, but i put the work in just in case

rjmccall
Sep 7, 2007

no worries friend

Fun Shoe

as usual, apple’s colossal flop disgusting failures would be runaway successes if they weren’t being compared to the iphone

apple’s wearables division brings in about half as much revenue as facebook

rjmccall
Sep 7, 2007

no worries friend

Fun Shoe

yeah, i mean it’s pretty intuitively obvious that people’s personalities are similar or different in various ways, and those traits drive a lot of things about them, and if you ask people to self-assess in as non-leading a way as possible then they’ll probably be mostly honest despite undoubtedly the occasional aspirational answer. so it’s not surprising to me that it’s a useful tool despite being grossly flawed especially theoretically

rjmccall
Sep 7, 2007

no worries friend

Fun Shoe

i think the thing about these traits being continuums and interrelated (and dependent on how you’re overall feeling, and subject to legit change over time) is exactly why people get different results all the time. that’s a big part of what i mean by the theory being nonsense, and if you read meyers and briggs about it, it’s clear that they buy into the worst conceptions of it

the management theory part is interesting. on the one hand it’a a huge grift like all management theory and the idea of putting people in a box based on their personality testing is terrible bullshit. on the other hand if it gets a manager thinking about how to deal with their reports as individuals with differences instead of demanding that they conform to a single idealized stereotype then it’s actually good despite all that

rjmccall
Sep 7, 2007

no worries friend

Fun Shoe

Neon Noodle posted:

SuoDuanDao 7 minutes ago [–]

On a tangentially related note, I've noticed that many heterosexual men imagine the comedian Felix Kjellberg (AKA Pewdiepie) must be the height of attractiveness for women, while few heterosexual women find him particularly attractive. I found this very confusing, but after a few discussions with heterosexual female friends of mine we've come to the conclusion that the kind of playfulness and disinhibition this persona consists of is looks like vivaciousness in a woman but immaturity in a man. I imagine some similar dynamics must be in play there

haha what

rjmccall
Sep 7, 2007

no worries friend

Fun Shoe

mrmcd posted:

This isn't about the comments so much but it's on the front page and it's amazing: https://paygo.media/p/25171

Imagine got for the layup shot of making GBS threads on Google and BigTech and failing so hard even HN can smell the nightmare rear end in a top hat boss coming off you.

this is a pro hate-click

rjmccall
Sep 7, 2007

no worries friend

Fun Shoe

quote:

Hiring, Firing and Promoting. The famous Netflix culture doc claims that culture is “who you hire, fire or promote”. I strongly agree with this, reality > theory. The challenge was that, as Google employees, we were subject to all of the Corporate hiring practices. It is practically impossible to fire someone for the basic reason that you don't need this role any more or there is a better person out there or just plain old - you are not doing a great job. This neuters managers and does not lead to great teams, driven by mission, pushing each other to do better. Fast paced products have different needs that change all the time. There are people who are great for a stage of the company and later, do not have the right skills as the company grows. It is not their fault, it is reality. But not being able to replace them with people that do have the right skills means that people are constantly trying to “offload” an employee on a different team rather than fire them - something that is not conducive with fast moving and changing needs. I learned the hard way that if another manager is recommending a great employee to hire, that they are probably trying to get rid of the employee since they cannot fire them.

quote:

Focus - as much as I tried to keep the team focused, being part of a Corporation means that the signal to noise ratio changes dramatically. The amount of time and effort spent on Legal, Policy, Privacy - on features that have not shipped to users yet, meant a significant waste of resources and focus. After the acquisition, we have an extremely long project that consumed many of our best engineers to align our data retention policies and tools to Google. I am not saying this is not important BUT this had zero value to our users. An ever increasing percent of our time went to non user value creation tasks and that changes the DNA of the company quickly, from customer focused to corporate guidelines focused.

quote:

Compensation - at Corp-Tech, the salaries are so high and the options so valuable that it creates many misalignments. The impact of an individual product on the Corp-Tech stock ins minimal so equity is basically free money. Regardless of your performance (individually) or your product performance, you equity grows significantly so nothing you do has real economic impact on your family. The only control you have to increase your economic returns are whether you get promoted since that drives your equity and salary payments. This breaks the traditional tech model of risk reward. Corp-Tech gives you now risk returns on equity. Since 2008, FAANG stock have only gone up so employees look at the equity is a fixed part of their salary with the only option of increasing. We tried to build an innovative compensation model but quickly ran into the challenge that employees viewed their equity as a given compensation so why sacrifice it for a risk model? These realities lead to extreme focus on promotion vs product success --Me > We > Product/Users. I feel that the risk reward model in Corp-Tech is broken due to ever rising stock prices and lack of personal impact on your returns. Perhaps Corp-Tech should move to employee share buy back where employees must sacrifice some of their salary for equity or change equity to vest by a product related metric to connect the teams performance with the employee returns.

quote:

Transparency and directness - I have always been a pretty passionate guy, especially at Waze. After the acquisition, I was invited to speak on many different Google panels and events and very quickly, I began racking up my HR complaints. I used a four letter word, my analogy was not PC, my language was not PG… I actually stopped speaking at events where the majority appreciated what I was saying but the minority that was offended by something (words and not content) made it a pain. I began watching what I said, what I discussed and began wearing a corporate persona (I was still probably one of the less PC characters at Google but this was my cleaned up act…). I value transparency and feel that people should bring themselves to work but that also means a certain tolerance of people not saying something exactly as you would like them to or believing something you don't. That tolerance is gone at Google and “words” > “content” is the new Silicon Valley mantra of political correctness. You can say terrible things as long as your pronouns are correct or can say super important things but use one wrong word and it's off to HR for you…

quote:

Work life balance. When I was growing up in Tech in the ‘90’s - there was no such thing as work life balance. We loved what we did and wanted to succeed so we worked like crazy to achieve great things. As I had kids, I learned the importance of being at home for them and that's how I understood Work Life balance - its a balance, sometimes you need to work weekends and nights, sometimes you can head out early or work from home - we balance the needs of the employee and the company. Today, in Silicon Valley, work life balance has become sacrificing Work for Life - not a balance. Young people want it all - they want to get promoted quickly, achieve economic independence, feel fulfilled at Work, be home early, not miss the Yoga class at 11:00am etc. Having trouble scheduling meetings because “it's the new Yoga instructor lesson I cannot miss” or “I’m taking a personal day” drove me crazy. The worst thing is that this was inline with the policies and norms - I was the weirdo who wanted to push things fast and expected that some level of personal sacrifice when needed. I don't believe long hours are a badge of honor but I also believe that we have to do whatever it takes to win, even if its on a weekend.

also some poo poo about entitlement

rjmccall
Sep 7, 2007

no worries friend

Fun Shoe

in principle it's worthwhile to e.g. teach the system to charge your electric car at 2am instead of as soon as you plug it in after a long day at the office drinking highballs and flirting with the secretaries

but there aren't a lot of other significant power-consuming jobs that can be time-shifted that way, unless you're going so far as to buy a home battery

rjmccall
Sep 7, 2007

no worries friend

Fun Shoe

Plorkyeran posted:

it's not too hard to come up with a pile of things like car charging and weed growing that benefit from scheduling, but the average household isn't doing any of them (yet, hopefully, in the case of cars) and i'm not sure that any of them would benefit meaningfully from real-time pricing decisions rather than just doing them at night.

true, and i think it might already be pretty common for electricity to be priced slightly differently for peak / off-peak hours

rjmccall
Sep 7, 2007

no worries friend

Fun Shoe

MononcQc posted:

It's like physicists went around trying to please have the farmer produce more spherical cows rather than acknowledging the model's limitations.

ah, i see you’ve met a physicist

rjmccall
Sep 7, 2007

no worries friend

Fun Shoe

perl ought to make working with unicode easy, in the sense that it has no excuse not to. its string type is opaque and primarily manipulated with high-level append and search operations. and yet

rjmccall
Sep 7, 2007

no worries friend

Fun Shoe

Penisface posted:

yeah, although i never felt rap and the associated clothing style is so obviously aggressive-violent when compared to metal (leather, studs, spikes, etc.)

can't imagine a rap album titled kill em all either

i guess the difference is that metal is overt and direct in it's messaging, rap not so much really? i don't know too much about rap so i'll not hypothesize further

lol wtf

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rjmccall
Sep 7, 2007

no worries friend

Fun Shoe

it’s a space telescope, elon. what it could it cost, ten billion dollars?

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