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fritz
Jul 26, 2003



airstrike 4 hours ago [-]

I don't know. As the son of a High School teacher and an unemployed father from a third world country, I'm probably not what you call "smarter rich kid" yet I went to a top 5 MBA. Many of my classmates came from equally diverse backgrounds and nationalities. I think 30%+ of my class were foreigners.
But go on, it's easy to hate on MBAs. It's the one bigoted view everyone is seemingly allowed to have.
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fritz
Jul 26, 2003



jmpman 34 minutes ago | parent [-] | on: Ban Facial Recognition at Festivals

Iíve always used the number of Spanish speaking radio stations on the dial as a litmus test for how much illegal immigration exists in my city. First generation and second generation donít typically listen to to the Spanish speaking stations, so the demand is being driven by the initial immigrants, the majority of whom are illegal (in my city).
No matter how much I hear about illegal immigration being cracked down upon, the Spanish speaking radio stations arenít being converted to another format, so thereís still enough advertiser demand to pay for the station. That can only happen if the advertisers are finding a large enough customer base to justify their costs.
If these radio stations then sponsor concerts, itís likely that the attendees will have a high illegal immigrant percentage.
Should the government be able to mass survey the Spanish speaking population attending these concerts, looking for immigrants who have not turned up to their deportation hearings?
I applaud the government for being that efficient with my tax dollars (I expect this method is much cheaper than others), but should they be doing it? Probably not.
Now what about facial recognition for known terrorists at large sporting events in order to prevent an attack? Maybe?? At music festivals? I can see the argument there too.
reply

fritz
Jul 26, 2003



codr7 11 days ago | parent | favorite | on: Magic Mushrooms Can Help Smokers Kick the Habit

Precious few mushrooms are truly poisonous.
And I've picked and eaten A LOT of supposedly dangerous ones, as well as other plants; something I suspect most people speaking out on the subject haven't.
As a matter of fact, I just got some red amanitas out of the freezer that I picked a few days ago. I'm going to fry them in butter with onions and garlic and make a lovely shroom sandwich.
Like amanitas, liberty caps have a very distinctive look. Soak them in water for a while if at all unsure, and only eat a small amount to begin with.
The really dangerous stuff is pushed by "science" and the people who come up with this FUD to sell their artificial, truly poisonous and addictive chemical cocktails for awesome profits instead.

fritz
Jul 26, 2003



Doc Hawkins posted:

i thought k-means requires you to specify the number of clusters you want ahead of time.

it does but you can run it a bunch of times with different clusters and pick the "best" one

(also its been more than a few years since ive done recommender systems but kmeans would def. not have been the first thing i reached for)

fritz
Jul 26, 2003



Cybernetic Vermin posted:

i think that impulse is backwards though, in that k-means is pretty good as a first "is this good enough?" check. in that it is one of those that is sure to get you *somewhere* without worrying about convergence or parameters (the k itself being a pretty intuitive thing)

the way i remember it is for recommender systems the thing to do is start with nmf-style factorizations, but again that was a while ago

otherwise agree in the absence of any problem knowledge kmeans is a good first start

fritz
Jul 26, 2003



a13n 21 hours ago [-]

These actions may look anti-competitive, but these companies are all foreign (China, South Korea, Japan). China does anti-competitive stuff to US companies all the time. I doubt there's any legal case for FB abusing monopoly powers based on this email. If anything, this is just very competent business decision making.
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fritz
Jul 26, 2003



SamReidHughes 9 hours ago [-]

Spineless? KubeCon uses a system of racial preferences when giving out free tickets [1]. The leadership isn't spineless, they're evil and they believe in this stuff.
(Hell, they also have preferences for gays, as if they're a marginalized or underrepresented group. That's batshit crazy.)
[1] https://events19.linuxfoundation.org/events/kubecon-cloudnat...
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fritz
Jul 26, 2003



tomp 1 day ago | parent | favorite | on: Itís Not Enough to Be Right Ė You Also Have to Be ...

No, it's just an example. Probably a poor example. In reality I don't often meet vegans, but people get upset for all kinds of reasons / statements, most commonly for political ones which are to be avoided on HN (and real life) (and are quite easy to avoid, if you want to).
Another (non-political) one that comes up fairly often, is that I don't think it's reasonable to congratulate people when they decide to get married... it's a decision after all, nothing to do with achievement and/or luck (for most people I know at least, who aren't extremely lonely to the extent that finding anyone that tolerates them is an achievement... in which case, "congratulations" would be more in order), and if anything, they should be warned (as many marriages end in failure). But if you say that, you're the rear end in a top hat.

fritz
Jul 26, 2003



Captain Foo posted:

is this the same shrughes that used to post here

ya

fritz
Jul 26, 2003



spqr0a1 16 minutes ago [-]

Light bulbs are a bad example of the dangers of cartels. Incandescent filaments are much more efficient at higher temperature but burn out quicker. In the common case, savings from reduced electricity cost more than offset the increased replacement rate for bulbs in accessible fixtures.
Short-lived bulbs were good the customers. In a market with perfect information people would have chosen them on their own. Unfortunately of 3 categories of information needed for an informed decision (lifetime, power usage, and light output) purchasers only had a good measure of how often they replaced bulbs. Usage patterns are too complex for improvements in a single bulb to be obvious on a power bill, and human brightness perception is roughly logarithmic so itís not visually obvious how much brighter different bulbs are.
Whether it was motivated by greed or not, the Phoebus cartel is an example of big business successfully advocating for the interests of the general public in the presence of information asymmetry.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Incandescent_light_bulb#Light_...

fritz
Jul 26, 2003



a rare mostly-good hn post


api 2 hours ago | parent | favorite | on: Virgil Griffith arrested over North Korea: enginee...

I knew Virgil and considered him a friend long ago when we were both very into evolutionary inspired AI research. I met him at one of the ALife conferences (in Bloomington, IN at IU) and he later attended a group I helped found in Boston called Grey Thumb.
Our archives are still at greythumg.org including many talks on ALife, genetic programming, and theoretical biology.
Anyway a few years ago I watched him get sucked into the same vortex as many others I knew back then. I am not talking about cryptocurrency but... I guess I'll call it "alt-right" for lack of a better term. His feeds started featuring race-and-IQ material and such and I heard stories about him behaving like a misogynistic rear end in a top hat which is not the Virgil I met in the 2000s. Seems like a ton of people got their brains sucked out around 2012-2016. I know many others including a once brilliant writer and artist who now sounds like Vox Day and has done nothing but rant about it for years (and zero artistic output of course).
Virgil understands a lot about evolution, so I spent some time working on a letter intended as an attempt to deprogram him. I took the approach of explaining from first principles why I reject this ideology for not only moral but also practical and theoretical reasons. (I now feel motivated to turn it into a blog post if I can find the time, but I have a startup and am time poor these days.)
When I saw him get into Ethereum stuff I congratulated him and hoped it would give him something sufficiently interesting to do.
Anyway I wish I had some Earth-shattering point or revelation here, but this just saddens me.
Virgil had a misanthropic streak I can empathize with as someone else who grew up as a geek having an awful time in public school. Underneath that he struck me as a basically playful person with a powerful mind who could have done great things. I wish he would have found something more productive to sink his brain into like AI.
Now I'll have to listen to the media trash him too, calling him a "techbro" when he was anything but that.
Like I said I was hoping Ethereum would be that but that was before I saw how toxic that world was becoming.
These events make it look worse than I thought. Honestly I partly blame whatever weird nexus he fell into. I feel like someone brainwashed him and strapped a bomb to him and sent him off to do their dirty work. None of the other high up bag holders in Ethereum went to the DPRK and now they are washing their hands of it. Anything to pump the token value I guess. I hope if that's the case someone is held accountable but they won't be. I bet they won't even contribute to his legal defense fund.
I also wish I was less time poor. There is something deeply toxic that has infected our community. I am still not quite able to see it in its entirety, though I can see its edges and when people get infected by it its obvious. For years I've been straining to compose some magnum opus to deprogram people but I can't grasp the essence of the thing quite well enough. Maybe this is how people felt when Scientology took over Hollywood.

fritz
Jul 26, 2003



NihilCredo posted:

peak circlejerk


tptacek 29 minutes ago [-]

I guess I'm saying I agree strongly with Dan Luu when he quotes me as saying that smaller companies that hire like this are playing to lose.



hmm, yes, i guess i strongly agree with the guy literally quoting me, what a smart and handsome fellow he must be

although the paragraph after that where he tried to pose as the vanguard of the proletariat was pretty good too

smae thread :


busterarm 2 minutes ago [-]

I guess everyone who ever had the means to create an endowment for a school is a criminal, then.
A hundred million dollars is a very powerful tool in the right hands. To suggest that having such means should be criminalized is farcical.
reply

fritz
Jul 26, 2003



1996 1 hour ago [-]

#1 problem: requiring identification. Sorry, I don't want to provide ID. We are not in a police state yet.
#2 problem: the snitching mentality. HAMs sure love to snitch on those who don't follow the rules to keep their clubs very exclusive and very obedient
#3 problem: banning a bunch of interesting uses. Can't transmit encrypted - linked to #1 and #2 I guess.
Overall, a nice hobby for someone who aims to work at a FANG: if your life objective is to obey, serve and extend the order decided by the status quo, HAM is a nice matching hobby.
If it's not for you, stay out of the snitchers band, and play on low power on the unlicensed bands instead. The smell of freedom is intoxicating.
reply

fritz
Jul 26, 2003



re: academic publishing and unpaid article review

hos234 14 hours ago | parent [-] | on: ACM signed letter opposing open access

Amazon pulls in thousands of unpaid reviews for any product. Now what do you do? Give all of them the product free?
Lets say 3 in 100 reviews are good. And you want those 3 to come back and review the next product. You are even willing to pay them something. Is there a guarantee that they have interest and will show up, and if they do, is there a guarantee that they produce a useful review of the same standard the second time around?
Thats just one simplified reason about the dynamics of this process, that is going to block everyone from getting things for free.
Its easy to react, to push to dismantle it and you just end up with YouTube style mega mass of comments under every vid where the best comments are guaranteed to get buried unless they pander to the will of the herd.
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fritz
Jul 26, 2003



Suspicious Dish posted:

hasnt vliw been tried and mostly phased out pretty much everywhere now? why does it still persist

movidius shave uses vliw https://en.wikichip.org/wiki/movidius/microarchitectures/shave_v2.0

fritz
Jul 26, 2003



klafbang posted:

You mean thereís no OTA update for fixing Ebola?

if you think about it, ebola is itself an ota update

fritz
Jul 26, 2003



Rapzid 1 day ago | parent | favorite | on: Write Junior Code

"Junior" might as well be an IQ classification.. How many people change their IQ?
The reality is something nobody really talks about.. When a company doesn't want to hire a "junior" it doesn't mean they don't want to hire somebody without X amount of experience in a tech stack or without X amount of experience in the industry.. They don't want to hire people bellow a certain aptitude.
Many "juniors" will never be "senior". Even if they get the title and salary. We all know "seniors" in salary and title only.
Some people are inexperienced "seniors" year one.

fritz
Jul 26, 2003



lainga 5 hours ago [-]

I don't agree with what greatscott404 says, but I will defend to the karma-death their right to say it without getting grey'd out.
reply

fritz
Jul 26, 2003



Internet Janitor posted:

"more than tweet: bad."

"tweet not read not"

fritz
Jul 26, 2003



candiodari 3 hours ago [-]

The main limit on plant growth is exactly that: a shortage of CO2 in the atmosphere. Yes, shortage. Will this actually make a difference with the plants starved of CO2, as opposed to a CO2-enriched atmosphere in the lab ?
(obviously I mean from the perspective of a plant that wants to grow faster, what matters from a global perspective can and probably will be different)
e.g. https://www.forbes.com/sites/jamestaylor/2012/10/25/contrary...
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(note: the link is to a blogpost titled "Contrary To What You Hear, Global Warming Has Been Good To Africa" by the president of the "spark of freedom foundation" and was formerly federalist society associated)

fritz
Jul 26, 2003



lightedman 11 hours ago [-]

"This is mostly due to how old the city is, rusty and lead pipes in old homes are impossible for the city to track and fix."
It shouldn't be that hard to track at all with a little brainpower. When did we stop using lead and iron piping? Add another 10 years forward and start from that date back, and find every home matching the age/time range.
Everything else should be copper and/or plastic.
reply

fritz
Jul 26, 2003



the city is the one you're thinking of btw, no the other one : https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=21997412

fritz
Jul 26, 2003



yters 8 minutes ago [-]

If I look at the operon structure of a genome, and squint a bit, it looks very similar to the LISP structure:
(func var0 var1 ... varn)
Could it be that the design of LISP is inspired by the structure of the genetic code?
reply

fritz
Jul 26, 2003



growlist 0 minutes ago [-]

Exactly! I had 'unconcious bias' training at work, one of the learning outcomes of which was to understand the 'scientific basis' for unconcious bias. After reviewing the material and finding myself somewhat dubious of its claims, I - as a good scientist working in a technical role in a technical company - went off to research for myself. Turns out the supposed scientific basis is deeply flawed. And yet, this training is being rolled out in many companies across the UK: training based on nonsense. What's deeply insulting - and worrying - is that this should be pushed on educated, intelligent people whose jobs in no small part depend on sniffing out bullshit. Do they think we won't find out the truth? Are the management so clueless/compromised that they actually believe in it? IDK.

fritz
Jul 26, 2003



Vox are garbage, out for clicks
An expert explains why Burberry, H&M, Nike, and Urban Outfitters destroy unsold merch ó and what it says about consumer culture. https://www.vox.com/the-goods/2018/9/17/17852294/fashion-bra...
If you're totally freaked out about wheat products on a second hand product (Yes, it was bought as new and looks gross) your great grand parents would be ashamed of you, that's privilege.
Just return it if you must. This one story is not worth the millions of views it's getting.
A working product should be destroyed because it had old food on it? That's fine, but don't pretend next week you are an amazing human who recycles.
Humans still work at Amazon and they make mistakes do we really need blood on this?
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fritz
Jul 26, 2003



fit2rule 21 hours ago [-]

Medieval Italian artisans had their free market: the wealthy lords and the church. Competition among themselves for these resources produced innovation.
reply

fritz
Jul 26, 2003



Oneiros posted:

des_t 1 hour ago [-]

I certainly don't support fascism but at least Hitler had some interest in science.

in that he didn't want any of the jewish kind yeah

fritz
Jul 26, 2003



tomc1985 19 hours ago | parent | favorite [flagged] | on: Anti-cheat kernel driver

These horrible analogies make me want to stab the writer with a pen
How about he just writes technically and lets reddit comments translate? I'm so sick of writers' concerns for illiterate proles (along with, in this case, a seeming need to maintain the energy and punch of a memetastic for-12-year-olds YouTuber) ruining perfectly good technical writing

fritz
Jul 26, 2003



tomc1985 3 days ago | parent [-] | on: The EARN IT Act: how to ban end-to-end encryption ...

Sexual abuse is terrible but I am so tired of it being used as the handle of the billyclub used to beat technology down
reply

fritz
Jul 26, 2003



arnautdaniel 1 hour ago | parent [-] | on: A Link to the Shadow Inc. App That Blew Up the Iow...

The amount of code, libraries, and resources needed to make this glorified calculator on a "smartphone" is truly overwhelming.
Could literally do the same thing extremely well with an ncurses program and a drat ssh link back to home.
Could literally have done the same thing with Google docs.
But no it's gotta be an app so Susan can use her smartphone. This is an official event, not an ad hoc conversation during soccer practice. Yet, apparently no one could setup a small desktop or a laptop to handle a singularly simple task and do it well.
Instead, social onus and seemingly common wisdom says everything must be a fancy looking app, and proceeds to throw 60k down the drain to accomplish nothing.
I'm impressed.
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fritz
Jul 26, 2003



the hackers are disrupting 'surplus labor'


ddalex 9 hours ago [-]

> Very few innovative people seem able to reap or retain the most value of their work.
Once a company pays you, it's not your work, it's their work. They paid you fair and square.
IMHO a developer need to produce about 10x what's his paid as to cover for the company costs and profits. If one thinks that they can cover those 9 tenths in marketing, office space, infrastructure, admin and legal costs in a more efficient manner, they should quit and start their own company.
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fritz
Jul 26, 2003



growlist 1 hour ago [-]

In a way I find it offensive that this service effectively denies my biological masculinity, which I consider to be an essential and distinguishing part of my identity. However, I'll not bother making a fuss because I realise there are far more important things in life: this being the difference between me and the virtue-signalling intellectual and moral pygmies in charge of ridiculous decisions like this.
reply

fritz
Jul 26, 2003



thu2111 22 hours ago [-]

Haha yeah -4, that's pretty far out. Lots of people who hate tax credits out there!
It's really hard to defend libraries though. They're not just an inefficient use of space. They're bad for the environment too, as people have to travel back and forth all the time to swap books, discover the book they want isn't returned yet, etc. They're often badly maintained. Their books get damaged, lost or stolen. Their selection is really, really limited.
Buying a book online is a great replacement except for the buying part. For most people books aren't a big part of their expenditure. For people for whom it is it'd be reasonable to effectively give them the money back instead. Especially now the marginal cost of the "book" is near zero, like with software. If the admin systems were good enough you'd never have to think about it: it could be integrated with the booksellers checkout system so the cost is literally zero. Of course that's not how tax credits really work today, but it could be done that way.
reply

fritz
Jul 26, 2003



kragen 3 hours ago [-]

Mathematicians are perfectly capable of doing all those self-care things, as monks do in every monastery. (By contrast, non-mathematicians are unable to build anything larger than a small hut without help from mathematicians in the form of geometry.)
I don't know of a single mathematician who has ODed on amphetamines, although of course amphetamines have been popular with mathematicians since they were discovered; and I know of only one who voted for Trump (Dan Kleitman), although undoubtedly others exist. The doses of amphetamines conducive to doing mathematics are about two orders of magnitude lower than the lethal doses, so it seems unlikely that someone who takes them to improve concentration rather than for euphoria would OD accidentally, as heroin users frequently do.
Funding is only necessary to the extent that it helps keep the torch-wielding villagers away from the gate. To the extent that it subjects mathematical research to political tests, it is not only unnecessary, but counterproductive.
If my filter bubble includes Bruno, Socrates, Mozi, GŲdel, Turing, and Archimedes, I think its radius is adequate.
I think the downvoting of my "tirade" to -2 has shown that non-mathematicians hate and fear mathematicians, think that all those killings of mathematicians I listed were reasonable and justified, and would like to silence any criticism of them.
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fritz
Jul 26, 2003



spectramax 3 hours ago [-]

At the risk of sounding "out of touch with reality" and "retro nostalgic", I strongly believe that a lot of clean, sterile work took place in the 1965-1985 era. From UNIX to SR-71, everything mankind did in the technical space was minimal, purposeful, clean, legible, durable, maintainable, modular and many other adjectives that would compound on the idea of creating a truly better product or service. Marketing took a backseat, science and data mattered and advertisement was truthful.
Today's world seems broken, fragile, noisy and unmaintained. May be that humanity needs to unwind, rewind back a couple of decades and try again. If you play the scenario of human evolution multiple times, I am sure a large scale system such as global society would end up in a different state... every time.
Reminds me of the story that Kyoto, Japan didn't get ruined because one of the military commanders in charge of the nuclear bomb drop locations, had a soft spot for Kyoto... and instead chose Nagasaki and Hiroshima. [1]
If we were to replay human progress, I want us to go back to that era and relive the engineering life. Must have been amazing to work in a technical field in the 70's and 80's. Now we have AI and Quantum and all these loving buzzwords, largely perpetuated by people who have no clue - marketing and PR folks.
[1] https://www.theatlantic.com/international/archive/2015/08/hi...
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fritz
Jul 26, 2003



uncurable mlady posted:

hn posters are extremely dumb



jimmaswell 10 hours ago [-]

That psychological tricks like this are necessary to make people see that 1+1=2 makes me feel hopeless that humanity can ever reach the level of Star Trek without some kind of genetic engineering or letting AI take over. The vast majority of people are like this, incapable of reasoning through anything, only defending the views they grew up with or that they ascribe to their "tribe" by any means possible, never taking a Planck unit of time to self-reflect. There's some respite on select internet corners but even those have their pockets of crazies.
I recently had to regrettably leave a fandom Discord server because a sizable portion of the populace including the admin devolved into screeching banshees with no capacity for rational thought at some /slightly different/ view than they preferred being posted in their politics channel, and I could no longer justify expending any energy trying to engage in a reasonable fashion with these people or supporting a server with such a rotten administration I'd lost all respect for. I wonder if those of us who can consider ideas without throwing ourselves on the floor in a tantrum over the fact someone disagreed with us should just move to another planet then come back and conquer Earth in the five years it would take us to develop the capacity to do so without such people in our way.
reply

fritz
Jul 26, 2003



Malcolm XML posted:

jamesblonde 18 hours ago [-]

A few medicines of note here: Ace inhibitors are a well known treatment that reduces blood pressure.
However, there are two different types of medicine undergoing clinical trials: Lopinavir/Ritonavir (tradename KALETRA) - a HIV medicine has shown promise and chloroquine - a 60+ year old anti-malaria medicine

Personally, i ordered chloroquine - well known safety profile. I won't wait for docs to discuss prescribing it if i get any symptoms. I may even take it for preventative use. I also have sequenced my DNA (full genome), and checked if I have any mutations that are know to increase production of ACE2 - increasing susceptibility to acquiring covid-19:

https://www.nature.com/articles/s41421-020-0147-1

:eyepop:

chloroquine, eh? https://blogs.sciencemag.org/pipeline/archives/2016/02/10/the-chloroquine-story-in-cancer-continues

fritz
Jul 26, 2003



bob dobbs is dead posted:

counterpoint: peter thiel was a liberal arts major

they make you take lots of ethics classes at stanford, it didn't seem to have filtered into that guys head any

my understanding is at stanford any idiot professor who wants to can teach a class that fulfills the ethics requirement

fritz
Jul 26, 2003



roenxi 32 minutes ago [-]

And honestly even the notion that the world during coronavirus should be that different is open to question. I agreed with taking action to delay the virus by a few months to buy time to both work out what was going on and figure out the most effective treatment strategies, but in Western countries people are seriously considering 12 month style lockdowns to protect potentially as low as 1% of the population who are well past the good years of their life.
In hindsight it may well be that the actuarial math didn't make sense - this isn't the first disease humanity has faced by a long stretch and we're potentially looking at severe self inflicted wounds for something that doesn't look like it is going to be the next Black Death or Ebola. The obvious historical precedent I remember is 9/11. Making any changes after 9/11 was a mistake the US never really recovered from. This would be a great moment to be a little hard-hearted and remember that everyone has to die of something.
We don't know what is going to happen from this economically. The economic forecasts are as flimsy and there is a lot of room for unpleasant surprises.
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fritz
Jul 26, 2003



my main beef with the post was the 'well past the good years of their life' bit

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