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eames
May 9, 2009



ItBreathes posted:

Reserved, I guess. I have a few changes to add but just editing that took 2 hours, so I'll do it later. Feedback on the OP greatly appreciated.

Thanks so much for updating the OP.

Maybe you could add a warning not to swap modular PSUs without changing cables.

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eames
May 9, 2009



I agree with charity rereg.

Not a great time to buy into Z390. Successor seems to be around the corner, Asus is already trying to move inventory with cashback promotions in some countries, new security mitigations were announced today (0 to 4% performance loss), any extra singlethread performance won’t be useful due to the 60 Hz screens.

If you go with the 1660 now you can save money for a midrange 7nm GPU next year and maybe even enjoy raytracing with your system.

eames fucked around with this message at 20:38 on Nov 13, 2019

eames
May 9, 2009



Boz0r posted:

I have a 6600K and 1070 setup. How much would I get out of throwing another 1070 in there?

like 20% more performance with far worse framtimes if all stars align and your title supports it.

You could look into buying a 5700XT during the ongoing sales if you don't have a G-Sync monitor.

eames
May 9, 2009



I had those Arctic fans for a while. Very quiet with excellent performance but the bearings seemed to be low quality and started to rattle after a few weeks of use, making them way louder than out of the box. Reviews don’t seem to reflect this. Wouldn’t recommend.

eames
May 9, 2009



Stickman posted:

Are you sure it was the fans themselves and not just resonance with something in your case? I've had rattling with a few fans but I've always been able to fix it damping side panels or adjusting grommets. I haven't seen it come up in customer reviews, either. If it is the fans that's good to know, though - I'll stop recommending them!

I had them mounted on those Noctua rubber thingies, so resonance is unlikely. I still have them in a box here somewhere, perhaps I’ll open one up to check what type of bearing it is. It could be that mine were from a bad batch, though I can see a couple of negative reviews on my local amazon.

eames
May 9, 2009



Cyrano4747 posted:

If the answer is just kick the can and use what I've got I can do that.

I’d either look for a 5700/5700XT or ride it out until next year. The Radeons deliver decent performance and have much better deals than Nvidia’s parts at the moment, even though they are more recent. Here in Europe I’ve seen the normal 5700 for 260€ with cashback and the 5700XT for 375€.

You could reuse that in a Zen 3 system and still hit 1440p/144Hz in many titles as long as you turn some of the sliders down. One title hat you mentioned (Doom) also has a track record if running better on AMD cards due to Vulkan optimizations, though these days Nvidia won’t be far behind.

I wouldn’t recommend a RTX card at the moment if you can help it, the prices are too firm. There are rumors how there won’t be new 7nm consumer chips released next year but Nvidia is known to make such statements and then just drop a new generation out of nowhere to avoid the Osborne effect.

eames
May 9, 2009



No, you won't notice a meaningful difference between PCIE 3 and 4 with current GPUS (save for a few, rare machine learning edgecases).

e:fb

eames
May 9, 2009



ItBreathes posted:

Yes. GSkill still warrants that it'll hit those speeds so failure to do so is still grounds for returning it, and the chances that it won't are small.

QVL sticks can also have better subtimings stored on the board but the performance impact isn't worth worrying about unless you're the kind of person who'd've hosed around with subtimings anyways.

I don’t think that’s right. Gskill doesn’t warrant RAM that doesn’t hit marketed speeds on boards that aren’t on the QVL. In fact they have even started to make their own QVL so the RAM has to be on the motherboard vendors list and the motherboard has to be on Gskill’s QVL list before they’ll do a RMA. With higher frequency bins they can even deny and blame it on CPU IMC quality.

eames
May 9, 2009



The Milkman posted:

How much do I have to worry about memory timings/latency when buying RAM for a higher end Ryzen build? If it's 3600MHz is that gonna be more or less good enough?

If performance is a concern just make sure the RAM is on the motherboard's Qualified Vendors List (QVL) and enable XMP (or whatever the AMD equivalent is called at the moment). Running the standard JEDEC settings isn't super great for performance and buggy or unstable RAM profiles are a nightmare to debug.

QVL RAM also helps with support/warranty issues if problems arise.

eames
May 9, 2009



Elman posted:

Is it ok or should I just get something better?

Should be fine, it’s rated for 200W and the construction looks decent (copper base with heat pipes and a good amount of fins).
Keep a eye on temperatures, they should stay below 90C when stress testing. Chances are that they will stay below 80C with this cooler.

eames
May 9, 2009



You want a PCIe 3.0 SSD. They should all work, just steer clear of SATA keyed SSDs.

As for your other problem, I’d use a bootloader like grub and configure it to default Linux after 5 seconds delay.
To reboot into Windows you can enter “grub-reboot 2” && reboot” from the Linux shell.
http://manpages.ubuntu.com/manpages...b-reboot.8.html
To boot into Linux just reboot as usual. There are probably other solutions if you need to frequently reboot Win to Win.

I don’t know your use case but VMs (i.e. KVM) work really well these days.

eames
May 9, 2009



VelociBacon posted:

The KS is just a higher binned 9900K. Simply put, this means when they're making the chips they pop them into a setup that tests if they can overclock well and then if they do they're sold as KS. The ones that don't get sold as K. This sucks because it means your chances of getting a 9900k that overclocks well is close to zero because they're being differentiated at the factory. I picked up my 9900K before they started this poo poo thankfully and can do 5GHz all core with relatively low voltage.

I don't know what to recommend. It is absolutely not worth it to pay that much more for a KS. The base level 9900K with no overclock is still plenty.

The normal price difference should be closer to $75 and it's worth mentioning that the 9900KS only has one year warranty instead of the regular three year warranty.

If you just want the fastest CPU available feel free to buy the KS at $600 max. Overall the regular 9900 K is better value. Be aware that the new Intel Desktop platform is expected around April (10 cores, new socket).

eames
May 9, 2009



nnnotime posted:

Interesting there will be a new CPU and socket by April. But I'm guessing there won't be a huge performance increase over the April 2020 Intel CPU release and the 9900K series. I'd wait for a price drop but wonder if supplies of the 9900K will hold up until then?

9900K supply shouldn’t be a problem. You are right that it won’t be a big step forward, however Zen 3 details should also be out around then.
There are rumors that Zen 3 will be a big leap forward in total performance which would put a lot of pressure on Intel to compete on pricing.

You might be able to pick up a locked 10th gen 8C/16T CPU plus budget board for the price of a 9900KS in summer, whether that is worth waiting for is of course up to you. I think the main advantage would be a new upgrade path but who knows what Intel is up to win their sockets.

The 9900K/S is still a very good CPU if the ongoing performance losses from security updates don’t bother you. There’s always something better around the corner.

eames
May 9, 2009



nnnotime posted:

Hmm, good point about the CPU security flaws: I had forgotten about Spectre and Meltdown. Do you think the new Intel CPUs will have those flaws eliminated in the firmware? Might be one good reason to wait, though I read one article that the patches for Spectre and Meltdown don't have a big impact on gaming performance.

I’m not a security expert so I can’t comment on that or what might happen in the future.

I have a 8700K/Z370 myself and was tempted to do a drop-in upgrade with a 9900K(S) but the truth is that I currently don’t need more processing capability and the competitive landscape is changing so fast that I’ll probably end up building a new system before too long. Hopefully one that doesn’t get hit by performance penalties every few months.

eames
May 9, 2009



Mikedawson posted:

Just a quick question: I'm upgrading my CPU. Will my old tube of thermal paste from 5 years ago still work or should I get some new thermal paste as well?

If your old paste was sealed, hasn't visibly broken down and the consistency is as you remember it, it should still do the job. Shelf life of thermal compound varies from product to product. I'd personally order new paste.

eames
May 9, 2009



LODGE NORTH posted:

If anyone has other recommendations, that'd be cool too.

There are some rumors about a major AMD GPU announcement at CES which is about a week from now. It likely has something to do with consoles or a launch in summer but I thought I’d mention it.

eames
May 9, 2009



Whiskey A Go Go! posted:

Is the only use case for 32gb of ram still productivity tasks? I am trying to talk my friend out of upgrading his ram from 16GB as he is convinced that he needs it for Cyberpunk 2077 and he only uses his pc for gaming.


Some games are starting to use 16GB, consoles with 16GB are out soon, the cyberpunk tech demo ran on a 32GB system and analysts expect RAM prices to rise again.

You are right in that he probably doesn't need 32GB for that one title but there have been worse times to splurge on RAM.

eames
May 9, 2009



Total Meatlove posted:

I’m playing around with the idea of moving my current ‘pc that was being thrown away’ media server into something more established and as a bit of a learning opportunity.

I can buy a HP DL380 gen 8 with 2 Xeon E5-2620’s for around £100, if I’m looking for something to play around with virtualisation / media server / RAID, would this be a good starting point or are there things that make it a bad idea?

Sounds good to me. I’d just advise to keep an eye on power consumption, older hardware like this often pulls 100-200W with just a few VMs idling. If you live in an area with high power costs and keep the machine 24/7 you may end up with yearly power costs that are higher than what the hardware originally cost.

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eames
May 9, 2009



Rhaka posted:

Is there actually anything on the horizon worth holding out for, or should I just build a new system now?

There is always something better around the corner, arguably the best strategy is to just „buy it when you need it“.

Intel is launching refreshed CPUs in the next months but they likely will require new mainboards and some well informed news sources have already reported delays and price increases due to the worldwide situation and the supply chain issues caused by it.

As for GPUs, AMD was going to launch new high end cards in summer and NVidia is not commenting on anything, so who knows.

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