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zedprime
Jun 9, 2007

yospos


wesleywillis posted:

Isn't that how they make re-treads?

Of course it is, I even have tires on my truck that say "regroovable"!
To retread retreads there is nothing acceptable about retreads unless you are some accountant for a logistics company.

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zedprime
Jun 9, 2007

yospos


Imagined posted:

I don't understand. The thing is all lit up! It has electricity!
Yeah then they can get the same mechanic to put an air conditioner on my push lawn mower.

zedprime
Jun 9, 2007

yospos


Phanatic posted:

Since this is a new thread I think it's time to get this one back in here:

http://www.sciforums.com/threads/vacuum-pockets-and-safety-nazis.41446/
Gonna get back on my laymen are the best inspectors soap box. All 4 points miss the physical mark but should have been addressed by procedure/JSA anyway.

1. What energy isolation is in place system wide to keep people away from the potential energy present in a vacuum system
2. How do you safely discharge the potential energy of the device when it's time to do so
3. How do we ensure a breathable atmosphere at all times (not just at initial isolation/deenergizing). In other words all spaces require a certain amount of air turnaround to keep breathable -can you guarentee that naturally or do you need a blower to get the air to be safe.
4. Ditto 2 and 3, do you have your LOTO and air supply sorted.

Maybe it reality it was and a big boss coming in to save the day with common sense was STDH and instead procedures/JSA got pushed up to the boss for approval. But you'd expect the tone for that story to be "see look I'm a smarty pants with my poo poo in line" instead of "I'm a smarty pants, those drat safety idiots are keeping me down"

zedprime
Jun 9, 2007

yospos


Platystemon posted:

Vacuum presents hazards, but “asphyxiant gas” is a fundamentally unsound model for the problem.
I can picture the form the safety guy was using in my mind's eye but in the last 20 years they've added vacuum as its own trigger independent of hazardous atmosphere to avoid the problem of safety guys not using The Good Physics Words which absolve hot shot engineers of having to document safety procedures because technically the gold fringe on the flag makes this an admiralty JRA.

zedprime
Jun 9, 2007

yospos


Was there any hazcom? On the package or paperwork signed to receive. It would have to be incredibly dumb and bad hazcom if a secretary can ignore it in favor of refrigerated storage instructions on the package.

Secretary's fault entirely depends on that, they shouldn't be authorized to goods receive anything they can't actually action on hazard management. But they need to know that to reject it until an actual inventory person can handle it Send it back with the courier in that case.

If it's just like a box with refrigeration needed on it, the safety failures are compound above their head. If the department receives refrigerated stuff like this often they probably need a goods receipt fridge to stash poo poo till inventory does their thing.

zedprime
Jun 9, 2007

yospos


ATP_Power posted:

I'm just guessing that if it's like most unis, the whole thing is underfunded and things like that probably aren't a priority on the budget even though they should be.

Whooping Crabs posted:

I feel like a lot of the chemical and biohazard stuff at my university is more geared to protect the university from liability rather than to create a safe work environment, like when my coworker was forced to clean up a spill of an unknown reagent that someone else made and EHS wouldn't touch the stuff (in an electrical engineering fabrication lab). I'm split between engineering (fab) and microbiology and do most of the ordering and receiving for my lab. Everything goes to a mailroom and initial receiving is always done by an office worker; I just have to assume none of the reagents I've ordered are damaged and leaking since they would have no idea what to do in the case of an exposure.
Sleeping on it and my initial take was probably even a little too reactive just because the initial story had special storage requirements. Modern hazcom is built to let illiterate high school dropouts work safely with deadly chemicals, like janitorial work. University clerical should absolutely have enough hazcom awareness to receive and disposition parcel amounts of chemicals.

That's assuming a lot about having hazcom awareness, and having something like an extra workbench/fridge in the specialty case to store it until an expert can handle it. But that's all a scale and price of change that it's just institutional inertia holding them back

Hazcom awareness should be more explictly in a highschool class by now with on the job specific refreshers by the time you're working. Kind of astonishing how many people can't recognize poison signs or leave unlabeled bottles of bleach around.

Greatest Living Man posted:

A ton of my previous institution's EH&S procedures were designed to reduce fines by the EPA. (In response to previous inspections.) Not really a concentration on general lab safety as much as improper labeling leads to the most fines, so be really anal about not using acronyms. Still had your typical nitric acid explosions, but I guess the bottles were fully labeled.
Proper labeling as hazcom is like step 1 out of a hundred but if you don't get it right you have zero chance of avoiding serious injuries.

Don't gently caress around with hazcom.

zedprime
Jun 9, 2007

yospos


WorldsStongestNerd posted:

So you admit you don't know what you are talking about, but felt the need to comment.
Chinese attitudes towards manufacturing, as you put it, tend to be worse than other countries. Its not due to genetic inferiority of the Chinese but rather complex culture factors that arise from being a late developing industrial power having to deal with already established powers. And of course they can produce high quality products when needed. It just amazes me that we are supposed to pretend that their general manufacturing culture doesn't have system wide issues because some dumbass thinks its racist to point it out.
Chinesium implies it won't get better until we get the chinese out of the loop when in reality its malignant profit seeking that has been had to be regulated out of other countries (and not incredibly long ago, using legal tools manufacturers are very interested in eroding), an active social solution to something that markets won't fix quickly.

zedprime
Jun 9, 2007

yospos


Man lifts are fun and a completely different thing. They basically are a paternoster without an enclosing shaft.

The real pictures of man engines make them seem less intimidating than the illustration everyone posts. More like a ladder rung that raises you up to meet the next rung halfway, and less super Mario obstacle. Still needs more coordination than a man lifts which you just grab and go.

E. Man engines went away but I think were temporarily revived for those old timey fun houses that were an excuse to grab people's rear end.

Which you know isn't too far from those trampoline places that have come around, which are places you can go to grab people's rear end and dislocate your shoulder.

zedprime fucked around with this message at 15:58 on Dec 10, 2019

zedprime
Jun 9, 2007

yospos


i am harry posted:

Hell yes they do:


Can you get them together with the train flame throwers?

zedprime
Jun 9, 2007

yospos


Nocheez posted:

Why not just hardware it and make that switch do nothing? It's exactly the same result...
It's tagged to primary but they presumably want to use secondary some day.

Gonna guess people kept flipping the selector instead of turning it off which probably gives the MCC a heart attack. Why it's set up that way and why they're using a wrench as a tag/lock is probably related in that it's a control box designed and operated by idiots.

zedprime
Jun 9, 2007

yospos


The internet is pretty great as a whole. But there's all these pictures of really exotic truck fuckling. Truck fuckling at really impressive angles. Truck fuckling with really unobtainably good looking trucks. Even violent truck fuckling. It's really starting to ruin my truck fuckling experiences in real life because of the shifted expectations.

zedprime
Jun 9, 2007

yospos


Sagebrush posted:

even if you haven't got any matches or lighters, that same steel wool trick works with a 9-volt battery. I bet you could do it with an old phone charger and a stripped USB cable and it would be a hundred times safer.
Glad I'm not the only one who figured "you know all that's wrong with this is he's using a fork next to the outlet" before "uh, match, lighter, or lighter flint?"

Now you have me imagining wiring that stripped USB power wires down a clothes pin that sparks when you close it after plugging it in.

zedprime
Jun 9, 2007

yospos


PurpleXVI posted:

One thing I always wondered about those gas burn-offs on oil platforms, and I'm sorry if it's a bit off-topic for the thread... isn't it a waste? Isn't that a volume of gas that could be used for other purposes? Or is the volume small enough that it just wouldn't really matter if you funnelled it off to run generators or something?
Miniaturized and modularized LNG tech has cut down on a bit of flaring, but it's still a very specific intersection of economic to do based on scrubbing costs depending on the flavor of the well and shipping costs because LNG still isn't a very favorable energy density.

E. Not to mention a lot of regions with well LNG success stories have started flaring again because of the glut of cheap clean natural gas from NA shale processes.

Aramoro posted:

My dad made the pipe work for a few of these. The flare stacks are always burning, think of it as a pilot light just in case something goes wrong and they need to dump whatever, they can't just eject it into the air so they dump it into a flare stack to burn off. The oil refinery and chemical plant near my home where I grew gets fined whenever the flares burn too much, it literally lights up the sky like an artificial sunset when they're really burning. the best thing is in the chemical plant and refinery at least they'll connect multiple plants to the same flare, they all dump into a reserve at the bottom of the stack. My dad asked the engineer there what happens if 2 plants dump at the same time, the answer was a shurg, they don't plan for that and just hope it doesn't happen.
It's planned for but they still hope it doesn't happen. Passive pressure control kicks in at first at the reserve tank, then at the individual units and you start venting out relief valves or burst disks. These obviously bypass any flaring and are right in the middle of poo poo so it's how you end up on a CSB YouTube with the narrator saying things like "unexpected low lying flammable vapor cloud."

zedprime fucked around with this message at 13:01 on Dec 17, 2019

zedprime
Jun 9, 2007

yospos


Gonna go out on my gas pumping limb here and say we should have attendants pumping gas and they should have better PPE than Oregon and NJ have required.

zedprime
Jun 9, 2007

yospos


A lot of data points just so happening to support deregulation. Hmmm who could have started pointing these out.

Paracetamol and aspirin are at the bottom of the list for analgesics but at least they have a proven pharmacological effect which is more than you can say for a lot of the poo poo they are hoping to put on the market if they manage to roll back regulation requirements on trials.

zedprime
Jun 9, 2007

yospos


SniperWoreConverse posted:

I wish to obtain the watts for free tho if this fucks up the electron bill it's not worth it
You're already paying for a bit of it but you're gonna pull some extra in the process of capturing that bit.

Lifehack: use power at the scale of a factory and negotiate losses to imaginary power out of your contract.

zedprime
Jun 9, 2007

yospos


How do the feathers end up in a vehicle to fall out?

"Stay back" placards are magic legal runes that mean anything you don't have the object in hand, stuck in the windshield, or on dash cam, you're not going to get any compensation from the other vehicle because it was an uncontrollable road pebble and obviously the government's problem.

It might be a hollow victory but a lot of insurance companies cover windshield work with a minimal claim process and reduced or no deductible because getting cause is getting blood from a stone but they absolutely do not want you using a compromised windshield.

zedprime
Jun 9, 2007

yospos


Ika posted:

They look interesting, but what the hell is a propriety washing procedure?
Trade secret process to get the plasticizers what turn frogs gay out of your plastic gloves.

zedprime
Jun 9, 2007

yospos


Erisian Automata posted:

What do they do with the gay-frog chemicals afterwards?
It's a coproduct sold to the new world order to dump in the ponds to turn the frogs gay.

zedprime
Jun 9, 2007

yospos


Platystemon posted:

I don’t see any Teslas.
There tends to be a few models at any given time that catch on fire more than the underwriters would recommend but only one make who locks you inside when it is happening.

zedprime
Jun 9, 2007

yospos


Jabor posted:

The whole point is that you're going to capture the methane and burn it instead of releasing it into the environment.
Its mitigated in that you take a high GWP and turn it into a low GWP. But I think he means we should cut back on the farting pigs altogether.

We're kind of turning the page on how much we can do with mitigation and how much we need to literally upend the supply chain for cradle to grave management of pollutants including cutting back on farmed meat.

And to get on one of my favorite soapboxes that in a lottery winning world I'd probably shop around grad schools: there's some reevaluation of recycling supply chains needed to control for emissions over raw material saving. We aren't going to see peak much of anything before the ecosystems as we know them collapse. Like paper products probably deserve to be hermetically sealed in the ground instead of recycled to add price pressures to paper goods while sequestering carbon.

zedprime
Jun 9, 2007

yospos


Is that a multimodal container cut in half and welded onto a truck frame?

zedprime
Jun 9, 2007

yospos


Kesper North posted:

The windstorm I refer to was a major disaster event that left 1.8 million homes and businesses without power.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hanukkah_Eve_windstorm_of_2006

I'm pretty sure, and please bear in mind that I am not totally uneducated, I saw some transformer explosions.
Did they glow eerie blue while buzzing or wailing until a sudden popbang? That's a normal fault and what they are more or less made to do when wrapped in live cables or there's a transient event cause something's going on just down the line.

Did they explode in a sooty orange fireball that gave instant cancer to anything downwind? That's an explosion and usually happens on direct lightning strike.

zedprime
Jun 9, 2007

yospos


I'm going to start a business where I repeatedly drive signs into low bridges so Twitter and the news keep giving the ad subject extra advertising.

zedprime
Jun 9, 2007

yospos


I think the tomb he is talking about is a fairly marked grave.

zedprime
Jun 9, 2007

yospos


The Mississippi River chemical plants are way down the list of things loving poor people in Louisiana.
1. Police and sheriffs. Obvious but there's some off the charts good old boyism that means they can get away with more then the very publicised LAPD/NYPD etc
2. Louisiana has some of the worst drinking water infrastructure you can imagine in a modern country. Brain amoebas from showering. A lot of rural areas have what is weak bleach coming out of the taps because it's all they can do to avoid brain amoebas and giardia with undersized treatment equipment and leaky pipes.
3. I guess the river chemical plants, but you really need to worry about the swamp ones more. There's a well equipped department of environmental quality that banks on the giant companies paying fines as a corrupt price of business. The river being big and muddy and not instantly noxious is a big tourist draw so it's the closest thing to a sacred cow and you'll pay out your nose for anything egregious. It won't stop you but it can get expensive. You need to worry about the fly by night waste processors and such that dump bullshit in the swamp and just leave the state when it becomes obvious. They're an organ related to the river chemical plants but they aren't the big obvious hunks of metal on the river.

For your next trick, look up Baytown and assorted surburbs on the bay and Buffalo Bayou Texas. Almost makes the zoning in Baton Rouge and New Orleans look sane.

zedprime
Jun 9, 2007

yospos


Me in My Summer Car when I swear I know how the wheel alignment works by sight.

zedprime
Jun 9, 2007

yospos


What magic spell did they cast on the tires so that they didn't lose contact and waterfall off the cliff in the inches of moving water?

zedprime
Jun 9, 2007

yospos


I think you will find the reduction in crime rate is because our boys in blue must use the energy density inferior octane boosters and they run out of gas before catching all the criminals they used to be able to on a nice leaded gas tank.

I am immensely kidding but the causation of the crime drop is still contrevertible and I don't want to stick a fork in it because the obvious cause is the lead but society usually finds ways to be weirder than obvious.

zedprime
Jun 9, 2007

yospos


CFC and HCFC degrade, reacting with ozone. That's bad.

I know, lets make them but they don't degrade. They're degrading cause of the big honking chlorine. We can replace that with flourine and hydrogen in a way the physical properties are very similar, with a stability that they will never react.

Oh poo poo. oh gently caress. They aren't reacting and are big honking molecules that bodily block photons and radiant heat loss to space.

The person pointing out we are sitting around industrially farting ourselves to death while watching and knowing exactly what's happening is a good thought, but if there's any theoretical future people looking back at the end of the 20th century they are going to look at banning tetraethyl lead and CFCs like "haha, they thought that was going to help?"

zedprime
Jun 9, 2007

yospos


Memento posted:

Also my understanding is that if it wasn't for the fact that HFCs were there, and could be used as cheaply as CFCs, the refrigeration industry would still be using them to this day and kicking and screaming the way oil companies are.
The Montreal Protocol is a very gentle phase out. You can still legally service your classic car with R-12.

Most of the traction came from specialty chemicals companies who had HCFC and HFC patents sewn up between a consortium aiming to wreck the Dupont monopoly. The ozone hole is fixing itself in spite of the situation.

zedprime
Jun 9, 2007

yospos


Early American firefighting was two gangs fighting over the right to loot the burning building. After the fight was over and any valuable furniture was loaded on the truck, they might start pumping water now if they feel like it.

zedprime
Jun 9, 2007

yospos


Uthor posted:

My coworkers keep telling me that they want to move there because it's "the #1 state in the country", by which I assume they mean has the lowest taxes. They never bring up what those taxes could be paying for.


What if, hear me out, we made it a law that everybody automatically paid into a general fund that would pay for the fire department for the entire community.
Opt in fire protection is one of those ideas I can't even fathom. It's intrinsically social, fires spread. Poor socialized fire protection has leveled cities. You can be the freest market motherfucker around and should still think "oh hmm maybe we should socialize fire protection." You can't buy an absence of fires on a market, I don't even understand how it becomes a question.

zedprime
Jun 9, 2007

yospos


Cyrano4747 posted:

For the same reason that people don't think they need health insurance: "I'm careful, I'm responsible, I'm not going to be the idiot who burns down his house."

People in this thread are aware that poo poo just happens. Squirrels chew up your electrical. A kid does something dumb. You have a human moment of failing and gently caress up with a grease fire and make it way worse.

There's a certain sort of person who believes that pretty much everything bad in the world can be prevented by being smart or clever enough, that all misfortune is ultimately deserved because the person was dumb or negligent.

This is dumb and idiotic, but I've met way too many people who don't think they need liability insurance because they're too safe a driver to hurt anyone or don't need health insurance because they're young and a non-smoker etc.
The risk is external though. Short of living on the moon, something on fire completely unrelated to you can threaten you. There is nothing you can buy on a market to help it (short of your personal moon base).

It's not libertarian to prefer opt in fire protection, it's contrarian.

zedprime
Jun 9, 2007

yospos


Uthor posted:

I listened to a story about a town that went full libertarian, removing garbage cans from parks and turning off street lights, etc. The more affluent areas paid to bring those things back on a street by street basis. They ended up paying more than they ever did in taxes (plus covering only their street, not the entire town), but were happy cause it was their choice and "freeloaders".
Things like this and the Nestle stance on water I can see how a hosed up brain can arrive at that conclusion. Markets good. Marketize everything, better.

But you can't put "not getting set on fire by a peasant" on a market. It's a simple obvious gap.

zedprime
Jun 9, 2007

yospos


Well actuarially that is not a healthy cashflow for maintaining and operating a fire fighting operation like others have mentioned.

zedprime
Jun 9, 2007

yospos


Zamboni Rodeo posted:

There has GOT to be some OSHA in here somewhere about how this system is rigged. The mind boggles.

https://twitter.com/brockwilbur/status/1218252514111283200?s=20
Whoah, they invented massively multiplayer Lights Out.

zedprime
Jun 9, 2007

yospos


TorpedoFish posted:

More EPA than OSHA but:

Not great, not terrible, until you think about the fact that back then "dump it in the ground" was literally the way to dispose of whatever you had back then, not just used motor oil. So you have the ground thoughtfully absorbing benzene up in Love Canal, PCBs in the mud at the bottom of the Hudson River, Perc and TCE in Woburn, MA, god-knows-what in Tom's River, NJ (and also actually a lot of other sites in NJ) and Cleveland* and countless other places.

Oh, and radioactive sludge in Hanford, WA. Who knew that that could cause a problem? Just dump it in a hole in the ground, it'll be fine.

*Cuyahoga National Park is lovely and right outside Cleveland and also the only National Park to contain a Superfund site!
Wait till you hear what kids are doing with their used car batteries.

zedprime
Jun 9, 2007

yospos


Selklubber posted:

Actually working OSHA:
https://i.imgur.com/7LOhwHj.mp4
Posted to the PLC forum on reddit https://imgur.com/gallery/F7avvFZ
9/10, very by the book but you should never break a light curtain plane bodily on purpose. Do light curtain testing with a broomstick.

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zedprime
Jun 9, 2007

yospos


Sex Skeleton posted:

Ideally the man or woman who programmed it gets to wave a body part across it. If they can't do it with absolute confidence then they need to do another engineering analysis until they're confident.

When I worked on a portable ventilator our lead who did all the actual controller firmware was the first person to breathe on it. After that we knew it was probably pretty safe.
The difference from a ventilator is you're never intended to break the light plane. It's an incidental safety instrument you should not count on (but can still save you).

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