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Dixville
Nov 4, 2008

Your Best Paw Forward

Ham Wrangler

LostMy2010Accnt posted:

I have a soon to be 10 year old, short haired black cat whose third eyelids have been showing for over a month now. I've taken her several times to the vet to get a physical, blood-work and x-rays taken and everything has come back positive. The only thing the doctor was concerned about was her weight which she's slowly been putting back on. Her behavior is normal, no changes in habits, her appetite is good, she's drinking her normal amounts of water, and was given a topical de-wormer. I'm confused as to why this is still a thing and concerned of what it could be, but my local vet has said everything is fine. Could their be other issues to this like allergies? Any help is appreciated, thank you.

I'll be honest, that's a bit unusual. Second opinion might be a good idea. Maybe a neuro specialist for imaging like ct or mri? The good thing is it's hopefully nothing serious as most of their vital signs sound ok (eating drinking ok, your vet would have assessed the mucous membranes and other vitals)

My thoughts: 1 possibly neuro because the third eyelid is controlled by a different nerve than the other eyelids so could see it stick up if not working properly, and 2 that third eyelid lifting is *usually* associated with fairly severe disease like infections, metabolic disease etc. So basically your cats symptom doesn't fit much with "eating drinking ok, gaining weight, etc." So that's why I say it's unusual. Good luck and I hope it's something benign for kitty!

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LostMy2010Accnt
Dec 13, 2018



Dixville posted:

I'll be honest, that's a bit unusual. Second opinion might be a good idea. Maybe a neuro specialist for imaging like ct or mri? The good thing is it's hopefully nothing serious as most of their vital signs sound ok (eating drinking ok, your vet would have assessed the mucous membranes and other vitals)

My thoughts: 1 possibly neuro because the third eyelid is controlled by a different nerve than the other eyelids so could see it stick up if not working properly, and 2 that third eyelid lifting is *usually* associated with fairly severe disease like infections, metabolic disease etc. So basically your cats symptom doesn't fit much with "eating drinking ok, gaining weight, etc." So that's why I say it's unusual. Good luck and I hope it's something benign for kitty!

I appreciate the response. I'll have to contact my old vet this week since they have more resources than my current vet. Thank you for your help.

LostMy2010Accnt fucked around with this message at 12:23 on May 8, 2020

nulldev1ce
Aug 16, 2002


Shiny Globule

Apologies if this has been asked and answered a thousand times before. Chronic kidney disease is pretty common in cats, as I understand it.

So, ours was recently diagnosed, based on a big increase in drinking water and peeing. Blood/urine samples confirmed it, and they prescribed the special food. My family's been down this road with other cats in the past...they hate the damned food. Ours seems to be okay with the dry, but she won't touch the wet stuff, even if we drizzle tuna water/oil on it.

I understand that the special food is lower in protein -- the first ingredient listed is water -- so my question is, would it be OK if we gave her a heavily-watered-down, smaller quantity of her old canned food that she DOES like? It seems counterintuitive to feed her *only* dry food when she's already thirsty...

YourCreation
Jan 4, 2004

A little creative surgery helps turn a few sick pets into a new and improved friend!


LostMy2010Accnt posted:

I have a soon to be 10 year old, short haired black cat whose third eyelids have been showing for over a month now. I've taken her several times to the vet to get a physical, blood-work and x-rays taken and everything has come back positive. The only thing the doctor was concerned about was her weight which she's slowly been putting back on. Her behavior is normal, no changes in habits, her appetite is good, she's drinking her normal amounts of water, and was given a topical de-wormer. I'm confused as to why this is still a thing and concerned of what it could be, but my local vet has said everything is fine. Could their be other issues to this like allergies? Any help is appreciated, thank you.

Could be Haws Syndrome

YourCreation
Jan 4, 2004

A little creative surgery helps turn a few sick pets into a new and improved friend!


nulldev1ce posted:

Apologies if this has been asked and answered a thousand times before. Chronic kidney disease is pretty common in cats, as I understand it.

So, ours was recently diagnosed, based on a big increase in drinking water and peeing. Blood/urine samples confirmed it, and they prescribed the special food. My family's been down this road with other cats in the past...they hate the damned food. Ours seems to be okay with the dry, but she won't touch the wet stuff, even if we drizzle tuna water/oil on it.

I understand that the special food is lower in protein -- the first ingredient listed is water -- so my question is, would it be OK if we gave her a heavily-watered-down, smaller quantity of her old canned food that she DOES like? It seems counterintuitive to feed her *only* dry food when she's already thirsty...

The main point of the diet is protein and phosphorus restriction. There are a TON of kidney prescription diets these days, so try some variety and see what she likes. It's literally the only evidence based thing you can do to prolong her life/quality of life.

nulldev1ce
Aug 16, 2002


Shiny Globule

YourCreation posted:

The main point of the diet is protein and phosphorus restriction. There are a TON of kidney prescription diets these days, so try some variety and see what she likes. It's literally the only evidence based thing you can do to prolong her life/quality of life.

We are going to try other brands, but the vet only carries two, and it took them a week to get me the authorization (they won't send it to Chewy directly, which annoys me) so it's not trivial and will take time.

I read that ipakitine powder can help with phosphorus levels, sprinkled/mixed into canned food that she might be willing to eat; and we were buying pretty premium food (Wellness, etc.) which is in line with the more-recent idea that smaller amounts of higher-quality protein are good (as oppose to an across-the-board protein reduction.) E.g.:

"Recently, use of "renal diets" in treating cats with CKD has become controversial, weighing the potential benefits of these diets mitigating the clinical consequences of CKD versus the purported potential risk of protein malnutrition consequent to the high protein requirements of cats. As a result, some veterinarians have recommended feeding diets containing high levels of dietary protein instead of "renal diets". This divergence in therapeutic opinion has evolved from recent studies suggesting that senior cats may require more protein than younger cats and the observation that at least in some cats with CKD, body weight, body condition score and/or muscle mass may decline over time."
http://www.iris-kidney.com/education/protein_restriction_feline_ckd.html

Thanks for the reply, I appreciate it. As with most things, I'm overwhelmed by the divergent opinions, the pet food sellers' "information" which is a conflict of interest, the tinfoil hat "I cook my cat's food fresh daily!" crowd, etc.

YourCreation
Jan 4, 2004

A little creative surgery helps turn a few sick pets into a new and improved friend!


Yeah being a consumer and making decisions is not easy with all of the marketing and crazies out there. I work in emergency/critical care medicine so the feelings on CKD management may have moved on without my notice.

LostMy2010Accnt
Dec 13, 2018



YourCreation posted:

Could be Haws Syndrome

Thanks for the info on that; I'll see if I can pass that along to my vet and get further directions.

Dixville
Nov 4, 2008

Your Best Paw Forward

Ham Wrangler

Please... don't be this person!

Dixville
Nov 4, 2008

Your Best Paw Forward

Ham Wrangler

YourCreation posted:

Could be Haws Syndrome

Wow I don't remember learning this. Thank you!

Slugworth
Feb 18, 2001

If two grown men can't make a pervert happy for a few minutes in order to watch a film about zombies, then maybe we should all just move to Iran!


So, idle question here, if any vets want to comment - If there's a concern about protein deficiency in renal cats with renal diets, would a hydrolyzed diet make any sense? Is it the protein that causes issues in renal patients, or the actual amino acids?

LostMy2010Accnt
Dec 13, 2018



Dixville posted:

I'll be honest, that's a bit unusual. Second opinion might be a good idea. Maybe a neuro specialist for imaging like ct or mri? The good thing is it's hopefully nothing serious as most of their vital signs sound ok (eating drinking ok, your vet would have assessed the mucous membranes and other vitals)

My thoughts: 1 possibly neuro because the third eyelid is controlled by a different nerve than the other eyelids so could see it stick up if not working properly, and 2 that third eyelid lifting is *usually* associated with fairly severe disease like infections, metabolic disease etc. So basically your cats symptom doesn't fit much with "eating drinking ok, gaining weight, etc." So that's why I say it's unusual. Good luck and I hope it's something benign for kitty!

YourCreation posted:

Could be Haws Syndrome

So I went to a second vet two days ago and they think Haws Syndrome as well. I'm waiting to hear back but this seems like the likely issue and we're going to continue care from there. Thank you both for the feedback and help, it means a lot.

Dixville
Nov 4, 2008

Your Best Paw Forward

Ham Wrangler

LostMy2010Accnt posted:

So I went to a second vet two days ago and they think Haws Syndrome as well. I'm waiting to hear back but this seems like the likely issue and we're going to continue care from there. Thank you both for the feedback and help, it means a lot.

No problem !

Dixville
Nov 4, 2008

Your Best Paw Forward

Ham Wrangler

Did a c section today. Hopefully the pup will survive. The mom has had a pup before and it died we did spay at the same time as c section so no more for her.

Slugworth
Feb 18, 2001

If two grown men can't make a pervert happy for a few minutes in order to watch a film about zombies, then maybe we should all just move to Iran!


Very jealous, I've never gotten to be part of a c-section. Everyone I work with assures me it's actual hell, but still, I bet the first one is fun.

Medullah
Aug 13, 2003

FEAR MY SHARK ROCKET IT REALLY SUCKS AND BLOWS


Hey guys my pups poop has been yellow and soft the last week or so. I'm trying to get into the vet but there's a backlog due to lockdown. She's been on the same kibble since I got her with no issues (Kirkland Chicken and Rice) and I have given her canned pumpkin for a week, but wondering if there's anything else I might add? It's not quite diarrhea but very close. She's 60 days past her final heartworm shot but still is supposed to be taking it easy for a few more months so I'm extra cautious

YourCreation
Jan 4, 2004

A little creative surgery helps turn a few sick pets into a new and improved friend!


Slugworth posted:

Very jealous, I've never gotten to be part of a c-section. Everyone I work with assures me it's actual hell, but still, I bet the first one is fun.

I have no love for this procedure

Womyn Capote
Jul 5, 2004




My 4.5 month kittens have little white worms in their poop, and they have been acting like they have fleas though I used a comb and didn't find any evidence. Do I have to go to a vet for this or can I get an otc for the worms and fleas?

Dixville
Nov 4, 2008

Your Best Paw Forward

Ham Wrangler

Womyn Capote posted:

My 4.5 month kittens have little white worms in their poop, and they have been acting like they have fleas though I used a comb and didn't find any evidence. Do I have to go to a vet for this or can I get an otc for the worms and fleas?

I believe praziquantel is available for over the counter. What you're describing sounds like tapeworms, and they come from fleas. Praziquantel is the best treatment for tapeworms so make sure the dewormer has that in it. For flea treatment there is frontline and similar products. Just make sure you get the one for cats and kittens.

MJP
Jun 17, 2007

Are you looking at me Senpai?

Grimey Drawer

We have two cats, both females, regular old domestic shorthairs, both spayed. I found light pink urine on the edge of the litter box liner for one of the two litter boxes. They're in the basement and the cats have had unrestricted access to them for years.

I did some googling and most of the results are "it could be feline lower urinary tract infection, don't panic and get them to an emergency vet if it's after hours, but go to the vet." My vet's office said that if we could collect a urine sample, we wouldn't have to bring the cat, just the sample. They'd do the urinalysis and ask us to bring the cat if a physical visit was needed.

Our younger cat used the litter box just after we cleaned it a few minutes ago (we didn't see anything off, she peed into the litter). Further googling suggested that we could line a litter box with plastic, fill it with plastic shopping bags all crumpled up, and leave the suspect cat in a bathroom with food and water for a few hours, then collect and deliver or refrigerate the sample.

I went ahead and set that up just now, the younger cat is in a bathroom with food, water, the collection litter box, and an open window. My wife and I are both working remote so we'll check on her at 30-minute intervals. Is that a sound course of action or should I try something different?

Dixville
Nov 4, 2008

Your Best Paw Forward

Ham Wrangler

MJP posted:

We have two cats, both females, regular old domestic shorthairs, both spayed. I found light pink urine on the edge of the litter box liner for one of the two litter boxes. They're in the basement and the cats have had unrestricted access to them for years.

I did some googling and most of the results are "it could be feline lower urinary tract infection, don't panic and get them to an emergency vet if it's after hours, but go to the vet." My vet's office said that if we could collect a urine sample, we wouldn't have to bring the cat, just the sample. They'd do the urinalysis and ask us to bring the cat if a physical visit was needed.

Our younger cat used the litter box just after we cleaned it a few minutes ago (we didn't see anything off, she peed into the litter). Further googling suggested that we could line a litter box with plastic, fill it with plastic shopping bags all crumpled up, and leave the suspect cat in a bathroom with food and water for a few hours, then collect and deliver or refrigerate the sample.

I went ahead and set that up just now, the younger cat is in a bathroom with food, water, the collection litter box, and an open window. My wife and I are both working remote so we'll check on her at 30-minute intervals. Is that a sound course of action or should I try something different?
That may work fine. There's also a product called Nosorb that is non absorbent litter for this purpose, or i think in a pinch you can use aquarium gravel

Pentaghastly
Mar 26, 2016


Couldnít find anything online so I figured Iíd ask here:

Is anyone familiar with Endosorb? Is it okay for me to grind it up or does it lose effectiveness?

My dog is on a bland diet right now (read: he picks pieces of chicken out of the rice) so I canít exactly wrap it in a little piece of cheese or some peanut butter like I used to and he hates pill pockets. And when I tried to put it in his mouth and rub his throat heíd push the pill through the little gap in his teeth with his tongue. I only have two hands so I canít exactly keep his little lips closed, haha.

So I started grinding it up and mixing it with plain baby food and that seems to work and he hasnít had any loose stools since we left the vet, thatís a good sign that grinding it up works fine right? Iím just worried because his stools were bloody and hurt him real bad and I want him to feel better

Peeches
May 24, 2018



Pentaghastly posted:

Couldn’t find anything online so I figured I’d ask here:

Is anyone familiar with Endosorb? Is it okay for me to grind it up or does it lose effectiveness?

My dog is on a bland diet right now (read: he picks pieces of chicken out of the rice) so I can’t exactly wrap it in a little piece of cheese or some peanut butter like I used to and he hates pill pockets. And when I tried to put it in his mouth and rub his throat he’d push the pill through the little gap in his teeth with his tongue. I only have two hands so I can’t exactly keep his little lips closed, haha.

So I started grinding it up and mixing it with plain baby food and that seems to work and he hasn’t had any loose stools since we left the vet, that’s a good sign that grinding it up works fine right? I’m just worried because his stools were bloody and hurt him real bad and I want him to feel better

The instructions don't specify so I think you are okay. It would say not to crush or split. Sometimes you gotta pop it just over the back of the tongue, then squirt some water in with a syringe ( if you have one)

Waffle Grid
Apr 22, 2009

You think someone would do that, go on the internet and lie?


My dog had dental work done yesterday (extraction of 108 due to a slab fracture, as well as prophylaxis work). I took a peek in her mouth today to get a baseline for how things were looking and saw something that I feel concerned about. I e-mailed the vet with a picture and he doesn't seem concerned... but I'm skeptical and wondering if someone here could give me their opinion?



My message to the vet described how when I lifted her flews to see the surgery site, there was a white fragment of something sticking out of the gums - it's visible near the top of the photo. It seemed fairly hard, but was thin and maybe a bit flexible? It was hard to tell. As I tried to get a better look, I pulled up on her flew a bit more and I could see the skin tear slightly around this white thing sticking out. I was worried I was making things worse and took my fingers away. As I did so I could see this white thing slip back behind the gums. I opened her mouth a second time, delicately, and the white thing wasn't visible anymore, but it feels as though if I were to pull up her flew again and make the skin taut, that there is something bulging underneath in that spot.

My vet's response was:

"it is hard to tell from the photo . There will be periosteal bone fragments that will be present. I did not completely suture the socket . Drainage is important. the carnassial tooth was removed in three fragments from the original slab fracture. The periosteal fragments will resorb. Currently there is no redness or swelling. sutures are holding fine. Umi should be eating well after a few days. Thanks for the update feel free to contact me if any questions"

Googling "periosteal bone fragments" isn't turning up anything, and although I can find lots of stuff about bone chips being left behind in human dental surgery and gradually working themselves out, I'm not seeing much about this sort of thing after canine dental extractions. I wonder if the vet is looking at the correct area, because this thing sticking out of her gums is not in the socket.... Does this seem normal to anyone here? I asked them to do x-rays if they thought it was necessary/important but they didn't feel that it was and didn't do them. I'm seeing lots of stuff online now about how x-rays should be done before and after to make sure everything is out. ugh.

Waffle Grid fucked around with this message at 13:33 on Jul 30, 2020

Slugworth
Feb 18, 2001

If two grown men can't make a pervert happy for a few minutes in order to watch a film about zombies, then maybe we should all just move to Iran!


Waffle Grid posted:

My dog had dental work done yesterday (extraction of 108 due to a slab fracture, as well as prophylaxis work). I took a peek in her mouth today to get a baseline for how things were looking and saw something that I feel concerned about. I e-mailed the vet with a picture and he doesn't seem concerned... but I'm skeptical and wondering if someone here could give me their opinion?



My message to the vet described how when I lifted her flews to see the surgery site, there was a white fragment of something sticking out of the gums - it's visible near the top of the photo. It seemed fairly hard, but was thin and maybe a bit flexible? It was hard to tell. As I tried to get a better look, I pulled up on her flew a bit more and I could see the skin tear slightly around this white thing sticking out. I was worried I was making things worse and took my fingers away. As I did so I could see this white thing slip back behind the gums. I opened her mouth a second time, delicately, and the white thing wasn't visible anymore, but it feels as though if I were to pull up her flew again and make the skin taught, that there is something bulging under the skin in that spot.

My vet's response was:

"it is hard to tell from the photo . There will be periosteal bone fragments that will be present. I did not completely suture the socket . Drainage is important. the carnassial tooth was removed in three fragments from the original slab fracture. The periosteal fragments will resorb. Currently there is no redness or swelling. sutures are holding fine. Umi should be eating well after a few days. Thanks for the update feel free to contact me if any questions"

Googling "periosteal bone fragments" isn't turning up anything, and although I can find lots of stuff about bone chips being left behind in human dental surgery and gradually working themselves out, I'm not seeing much about this sort of thing after canine dental extractions. I wonder if the vet is looking at the correct area, because this thing sticking out of her gums is not in the socket.... Does this seem normal to anyone here? I asked them to do x-rays if they thought it was necessary/important but they didn't feel that it was and didn't do them. I'm seeing lots of stuff online now about how x-rays should be done before and after to make sure everything is out. ugh.
Vet tech here, so defer to someone smarter than me if they answer, but I do a ton of dentals, so I'll give this a shot since this thread doesn't always get replies super fast. Your vet isn't wrong though, it's very difficult to tell what's going on from a photo.

There are a few different ways to pull a tooth, but a 108 that's still got healthy purchase to the jaw will generally be removed by cutting the gum tissue and pulling it back from the bone. The bone is then burred down to reveal the tooth roots, and the tooth is cut into pieces and extracted. The leftover bone tends to have lots of little sharp bits from the work done, so the surgeon will then burr the bone down a bit to smooth it out, and then the surgeon or the tech sutures the gingival flap over the whole site. It *looks* like maybe they missed a sharp bit of bone, and it has poked through the gingival flap.

That being said, it's not ideal, but my guess is your pup will be fine. Mouths heal well, granulation tissue forms over small bits of exposed bone, life goes back to normal. Is she eating well, acting herself, doing all the normal dog things? If so, stick to a soft food diet for a little longer than your vet may have suggested just to give that site longer to heal up. Keep an eye on the site, but be gentle with it. I've seen worse looking extraction sites (total dehiscence) heal on their own quite well.

Waffle Grid
Apr 22, 2009

You think someone would do that, go on the internet and lie?


Slugworth posted:

Vet tech here, so defer to someone smarter than me if they answer, but I do a ton of dentals, so I'll give this a shot since this thread doesn't always get replies super fast. Your vet isn't wrong though, it's very difficult to tell what's going on from a photo.

There are a few different ways to pull a tooth, but a 108 that's still got healthy purchase to the jaw will generally be removed by cutting the gum tissue and pulling it back from the bone. The bone is then burred down to reveal the tooth roots, and the tooth is cut into pieces and extracted. The leftover bone tends to have lots of little sharp bits from the work done, so the surgeon will then burr the bone down a bit to smooth it out, and then the surgeon or the tech sutures the gingival flap over the whole site. It *looks* like maybe they missed a sharp bit of bone, and it has poked through the gingival flap.

That being said, it's not ideal, but my guess is your pup will be fine. Mouths heal well, granulation tissue forms over small bits of exposed bone, life goes back to normal. Is she eating well, acting herself, doing all the normal dog things? If so, stick to a soft food diet for a little longer than your vet may have suggested just to give that site longer to heal up. Keep an eye on the site, but be gentle with it. I've seen worse looking extraction sites (total dehiscence) heal on their own quite well.

Thanks so much for the fast and informative response - I really appreciate it! Sunday (the day of surgery) was pretty much a write-off for her behaviourally because she was exhausted from the procedure. Yesterday she was much more herself, but not 100%. She didn't eat a ton, but when she did eat (soaked mushy kibble and/or wet food) she didn't seem to be having difficulty. She's a chronic under-eater anyway though so take that for what you will. She's normally a very playful dog that loves chewing on things and using her mouth a lot, but understandably didn't have any interest in those activities yesterday. I feel like it will take a bit of time to see if she returns to normal in that regard since I need to keep her from these types of activities for now, especially in light of the potential bone shard.

Any ideas whether the fragment will always be there even if the tissue heals around it, or if it will instead push itself out or resorb? Or any long term complications even if it heals up for the time being?

I understand that things don't always go perfectly in surgery, no matter the skill level and how good intentions were... but is it reasonable for such an obvious bone shard to have been missed? It makes me question the rest of the clinic's work I guess and if I should return to them or not. Anything I could do to help ensure that this doesn't happen in future if she gets another tooth removed? Insist on before/after x-rays?

Waffle Grid fucked around with this message at 13:39 on Jul 30, 2020

Peeches
May 24, 2018



Hi! Another vet tech here. I think you should go back, is you can, this is something that seems abnormal and it's bothering you.

Did they take x-rays? We always do for our dentals, bit I know some places make them optional.
I honestly can't imagine that large of a shard to be left. It looks jagged, therefore could be uncomfortable. If they did take x-rays, ask for them to review them with you.

Worse case scenario, get a second opinion.

Slugworth
Feb 18, 2001

If two grown men can't make a pervert happy for a few minutes in order to watch a film about zombies, then maybe we should all just move to Iran!


Waffle Grid posted:

Any ideas whether the fragment will always be there even if the tissue heals around it, or if it will instead push itself out or resorb? Or any long term complications even if it heals up for the time being?

I understand that things don't always go perfectly in surgery, no matter the skill level and how good intentions were... but is it reasonable for such an obvious bone shard to have been missed? It makes me question the rest of the clinic's work I guess and if I should return to them or not. Anything I could do to help ensure that this doesn't happen in future if she gets another tooth removed? Insist on before/after x-rays?
First of all, to clarify, you're totally justified in bringing the pup back in for a recheck. It should be offered as a free exam, and I think that's definitely your best course of action. My speculation was intended just as guidance on what might be happening. Your doctor is smarter than me, and having hands on access to the dog will be the best way to diagnose what's going on.

If I'm right and it's still attached, just a jagged area of bone, then it won't be resorbed, but the tissue will hopefully grow over it, the gingiva will tack back down to the bone, and everything will be fine long term. If it's a chunk of bone or tooth just floating around in the pocket, then I wouldn't necessarily trust that something that large would resorb. It looks pretty large. By that token, it's hard for me to imagine them missing a free floating chunk of something that large while suturing. Little salt grain sized chunks that flew off while drilling, sure, but that thing would be noticed just sitting there in the pocket.

As to whether you should trust them or not, since we don't even know what happened for sure, I don't think it'd be fair to say. Its not outside the realm of imagination that an otherwise good doctor could miss burring down a ridge though. Dental reextractions are bloody affairs in tight quarters where you're trying to prop open a mouth, hold back lips, hold back gingiva, etc while you work. If you've always felt like they gave good care in the past, and they resolve this issue to your satisfaction, I don't think it would be a deal breaker for me. If this is like, one more issue you've had with them though, that's a different story.

I will say a few things are at least different from how I've always seen dentals done though - We definitely x-ray everything (though if I'm right about what's going on, it wouldn't have been caught by x-ray. Other causes might have though), and we close all our flaps completely. Drainage is definitely important elsewhere, but it's always been explained to me that dentals get closed fully because drainage isn't worth the trade-off of food getting packed into an open wound. I understand the logic of wanting it to drain though, so it's not like, crazy, and maybe the way I've always seen dentals done is in fact the wrong way.

Let us know what happens.

`Nemesis
Dec 30, 2000





Clapping Larry

Hello, my roomates dog seems to be bothered by one of his ears. It doesnít look red/irritated, but it smells funny and looks dirty. A few flushes with an otic ear wash hasnít seemed to help, but I donít think my roomate is doing it consistently enough to actually help.

Aside from the obvious of rinsing more often, is there a ďhome remedyĒ that can be used to kill an infection in a dogs ear?

Otherwise Iíll twist his arm to get the dog in, but it would be nice to avoid the expense.

Beach Bum
Jan 13, 2010


Better a vet visit sooner rather than later, take from a guy who's been fighting with his Labrador's ears for what seems like a year now. Vet should be able to do a quick cytology to see what it is and determine how to treat it.

Edit: I am not a vet, just to be clear, I've just learned far more about treating ears than I cared to do otherwise.

Beach Bum fucked around with this message at 07:59 on Aug 12, 2020

Peeches
May 24, 2018



`Nemesis posted:

Hello, my roomates dog seems to be bothered by one of his ears. It doesn’t look red/irritated, but it smells funny and looks dirty. A few flushes with an otic ear wash hasn’t seemed to help, but I don’t think my roomate is doing it consistently enough to actually help.

Aside from the obvious of rinsing more often, is there a “home remedy” that can be used to kill an infection in a dogs ear?

Otherwise I’ll twist his arm to get the dog in, but it would be nice to avoid the expense.

Odor is usually a sign of infection. The ear canal goes way down and over where you can't see.
If you are confident in ear cleaning you could use a "drying ear cleaner safe for dogs" to flush out the ears thoroughly. Most people are not don't use fluid to reach down. Don't shove anything in the ear.
Otherwise a vet visit! Ear infections are very uncomfortable and most dogs just put up with them until they are very bad.


***There is nothing you can I purchase to resolve an ear infection from the store, it needs to be medication from a vet for a dog

`Nemesis
Dec 30, 2000





Clapping Larry

Thanks all, guess itíll be a visit to the vet then.

Vernii
Dec 7, 2006



My girlfriend and I are bottle raising an orphaned kitten. His mother was a young and tiny stray that was having a lot of difficulty, had an emergency c-section, she didnt make it and the rest of the litter was stillborn. He's currently 6 days old and has been doing mostly well (just over 4 oz weight, good appetite, no problems feeding), but we've run into some problems today.

I suspect now that he had diarrhea the last couple days (consistency and color was fine/loose but frequency was about every other feeding), and today his stool has gotten more firm but he's straining to pass it, and due to the frequent cleanings his butt is quite raw, which means even gentle stimulation just results in him screaming. We get some firm poop out each time but it definitely hurts him and its heartbreaking to do and listen to. Kitten blogs suggested non-zinc diaper cream or preparation H to sooth but even light applications result in more screaming.

He acts fine otherwise: healthy appetite, sleeps well, though tired this evening from fighting us. Mostly I'm looking for how to keep him clean without continue to accidentally torture him.

Possibly relevant: We gave him a probiotic mixed with pedialyte earlier, and his current diet is mostly KMR with variations of nutrical, pedialyte, and colostrum mixed in.

Chaosfeather
Nov 4, 2008



Vernii posted:

My girlfriend and I are bottle raising an orphaned kitten. His mother was a young and tiny stray that was having a lot of difficulty, had an emergency c-section, she didnt make it and the rest of the litter was stillborn. He's currently 6 days old and has been doing mostly well (just over 4 oz weight, good appetite, no problems feeding), but we've run into some problems today.

I suspect now that he had diarrhea the last couple days (consistency and color was fine/loose but frequency was about every other feeding), and today his stool has gotten more firm but he's straining to pass it, and due to the frequent cleanings his butt is quite raw, which means even gentle stimulation just results in him screaming. We get some firm poop out each time but it definitely hurts him and its heartbreaking to do and listen to. Kitten blogs suggested non-zinc diaper cream or preparation H to sooth but even light applications result in more screaming.

He acts fine otherwise: healthy appetite, sleeps well, though tired this evening from fighting us. Mostly I'm looking for how to keep him clean without continue to accidentally torture him.

Possibly relevant: We gave him a probiotic mixed with pedialyte earlier, and his current diet is mostly KMR with variations of nutrical, pedialyte, and colostrum mixed in.

I'm sure this thread has people who give good advice, but the foster thread has some excellent resources re: tiny kittens and their care as well. Go ahead and give them a shot. https://forums.somethingawful.com/showthread.php?threadid=3768887

Thanks for taking in tiny kitten

Vernii
Dec 7, 2006



Chaosfeather posted:

I'm sure this thread has people who give good advice, but the foster thread has some excellent resources re: tiny kittens and their care as well. Go ahead and give them a shot. https://forums.somethingawful.com/showthread.php?threadid=3768887

Thanks for taking in tiny kitten

Thanks, cross posted there.

Ardemia
Jan 2, 2004

IT IS MY RIGHT TO GET BEHIND THE WHEEL WHEN I'VE PUT BACK SIX SHIRLEY TEMPLES OK



I have a question about hyperkeratosis and mobility:

I recently moved in to a house with hardwood floors. I'm noticing my dog slip and slide on them, more than she did on tile and vinyl flooring at previous places. I checked her paws and noticed that her hyperkeratosis on her pads seemed to be worse than the last time I checked. She has always been somewhat guarding of people touching her paws and pads. The spots on her pads with more hyperkeratosis than others seem to be extra sensitive/painful to her than other parts of her pads. I'm thinking this is contributing to the slipping and sliding which makes her less likely to walk around the house than she used to.

What can I do to help fix her pads, and otherwise help her mobility on these new, slicker floors? Is there a particular pad balm I could try to help with the hyperkeratosis? She is still walking plenty, up to two miles a day with me when the weather is up to her standards (lol), but I don't want to impede her mobility, and keep her as active and healthy as I can for as long as I can.

Beach Bum
Jan 13, 2010


Re: Canine ear infections

My vet and I have been fighting an ear infection in my Labrador for what seems like over a year now. We had been treating with Claro, which seemed to clear things up for a while at each administration, but the thing that has finally knocked it down for good is a professional flush at the vet followed by a 3-week twice-daily course of Surolan. However, I temper this conclusion with the fact that he was on antibiotics at the same time due to some moderate gastrointestinal stress (which turned out to be the result of him eating about 10 lb worth of milk bones he stole out of the box). Do whatever your vet tells you to do, of course, but this course was something that seems to have worked for a particularly stubborn ear infection.

Definitely go to the vet though. Ear infections are not fun for your buddy, and can lead to complications like aural hematoma from excessive head shaking due to the irritation, and permanent nerve damage resulting in a head tilt or balance issues. I spent thousands of dollars on dozens of vet visits for my buddy boy, and he will forever keep his chunky scarred ears due to three aural hematoma surgeries, but his balance issues and head tilt have mostly resolved. I think a lot of my grief comes down to the fact that my parents were taking care of him at the time, and I was not keeping up with the home care. When I finally got off my rear end, brought him into my household, and took control of the situation, things cleared up quickly but a lot of the permanent damage was already done. Don't wait, don't sit on this, attack it immediately and with extreme prejudice.

Beach Bum fucked around with this message at 07:08 on Sep 5, 2020

Peeches
May 24, 2018



Ardemia posted:

I have a question about hyperkeratosis and mobility:

I recently moved in to a house with hardwood floors. I'm noticing my dog slip and slide on them, more than she did on tile and vinyl flooring at previous places. I checked her paws and noticed that her hyperkeratosis on her pads seemed to be worse than the last time I checked. She has always been somewhat guarding of people touching her paws and pads. The spots on her pads with more hyperkeratosis than others seem to be extra sensitive/painful to her than other parts of her pads. I'm thinking this is contributing to the slipping and sliding which makes her less likely to walk around the house than she used to.

What can I do to help fix her pads, and otherwise help her mobility on these new, slicker floors? Is there a particular pad balm I could try to help with the hyperkeratosis? She is still walking plenty, up to two miles a day with me when the weather is up to her standards (lol), but I don't want to impede her mobility, and keep her as active and healthy as I can for as long as I can.

The best thing to do is buy cheap carpet runners for every where in the house. dogs lick off balm and they don't work as good as you would like. Talk to your vet if the elbows bleed or smell bad

Sleepytime
Dec 21, 2004

two shots of happy, one shot of sad



Soiled Meat

I have a 9 month old puppy and have started going on short bike rides with him for exercise. My question is - since he's still growing, how much do I need to worry about affecting his growth / growth plates with too much exercise? It's been a good way to work out excess energy and helps with training him for leash walking.

He's an Irish Setter / Poodle mix and currently about 50 lbs. The vet thinks he is almost full weight but will still add height/length and a few more pounds. She mentioned that we should be careful not to do too much running but didn't really clarify, and we got distracted and didn't get a chance to follow up on that. I've read online that dogs will keep growing until 18 months and exercise should be limited until then. We've been doing 1 mile and I haven't noticed any soreness or issues in the few weeks that we've been doing it.

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GreenaBoy
Jan 6, 2005

I like to fart in the bathtub and bite the bubbles...GRAVITAS!!!



Just trying to make one of my best friends comfortable.

I got an old cat who is about 17 and a half and is definitely showing age. We have to give her an IV every two days and some anti inflammatory drugs. Watching her get old and slowly not be able to do things she used to is crushing me. I'm fortunate I can be home a lot to keep an eye on her due to the ongoing lockdown. I'm doing my best to try and keep her comfortable and she is just moving slower I feel like every day. She got checked out by the vet a little while ago and was super constipated and needed an enema and hasn't been the same since. Other than her ongoing renal failure the vet says she's doing well given everything.
She now has trouble moving up and down our bed so we got her some steps. She does her best effort to make to the litterbox. She gets right in front pees then goes in it. But then she will get litter in her vagina that I have to clean out. We are pretty sure it's muscle and joint pain. We are getting a cat box made for old cats. She drinks a lot and still tries to play our little games/give me soft meows/even try to stumble sit on my shoulders a couple times a day. I feel guilt ridden because she stares at me if I'm nearby and will always want my lap. She is the pickiest eater ever so finding food she's interested is the hard but she will still, barely, eat and is still losing weight. We are also giving her miratazapene to help increase appetite and gabapentin for pain inflammation but makes her seriously wobbly. 

TLDR; I have an old cat who I'm trying to make comfortable while she lives out the rest of her life as she slowly deteriorates. Any special tips, foods(she is picky and usually likes trash kitty food constantly something different), massages, cat litter (she keeps getting litter in her vagina that I have to clean so I got paper pellet litter), aroma therapy candles, I'll do whatever to keep my friend comfortable.

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