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Joburg
May 19, 2013



Fun Shoe

Sorry your friend is hurting

My old cat was helped a lot by daily buprenorphine (sp?) for arthritis pain. The vet preloaded it into little syringes that I just squirted into her mouth. She didnít like it but it was quick and then she got her favorite treat so she tolerated it.

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GreenaBoy
Jan 6, 2005

I like to fart in the bathtub and bite the bubbles...GRAVITAS!!!



Thank you for the suggestion for the pain meds. I called the VET today and they may switch it when I pick up her IV fluids tomorrow.

Peeches
May 24, 2018



My old cat did great with a heating pad, I put them in every room, they helped her old bones feel better and she was able to stay part of the family

Chainclaw
Feb 14, 2009



We have a ~5 month old kitten that has had diarrhea problems since day one. Had some worms which the vet says were cleared up in August, and he seemed to be slowly getting better until the last couple days. We've seen a vet about it a bunch but the vet hasn't really offered much solutions besides the dewormer (which worked to remove the worms) and some probiotics. We're going to try a new vet soon. Google of course gives a bunch of different ideas, one that seems interesting is a 12 hour fast + adding some more fiber to his food after that fast, which we'll ask the vet about.

Right now we basically have to keep the kitten locked in the bathroom during the day while I'm working and at night while we sleep, and we keep a tarp over our bed while he's out because he pees in it otherwise. He obviously doesn't like being cooped up like that, but we don't really have an option. When he's out, one of us basically has to follow him with a spray to clean his poop dribbles everywhere.

I'm posting here mostly looking for any other ideas we can talk to our vet about, and maybe some sympathy for how much poo poo we have to clean up all over every day.

Joburg
May 19, 2013



Fun Shoe

Chainclaw posted:

We have a ~5 month old kitten that has had diarrhea problems since day one.

Poor kitty! Years ago one of our cats had IBD and always had yucky runny poops. Coincidentally my husband has IBS and one of the home remedies at the time was to increase the SOLUBLE FIBER in his diet. We tried that with the cat and it helped a lot, so I agree with google on the fiber, but I donít think the fasting is necessary.

Get some unflavored citrucel (or equivalent) and add a pinch to some watered down wet food and see if it helps. Go easy on it at first though, it doesnít take much for a little kitty. I think at most our 16lb cat was up to 2 big pinches a day. Also be sure that you get SOLUBLE fiber, insoluble can make it all get horribly worse

Chainclaw
Feb 14, 2009



Joburg posted:

Poor kitty! Years ago one of our cats had IBD and always had yucky runny poops. Coincidentally my husband has IBS and one of the home remedies at the time was to increase the SOLUBLE FIBER in his diet. We tried that with the cat and it helped a lot, so I agree with google on the fiber, but I donít think the fasting is necessary.

Get some unflavored citrucel (or equivalent) and add a pinch to some watered down wet food and see if it helps. Go easy on it at first though, it doesnít take much for a little kitty. I think at most our 16lb cat was up to 2 big pinches a day. Also be sure that you get SOLUBLE fiber, insoluble can make it all get horribly worse

Thanks for the suggestion. I really want a vet to recommend an option like that, but even after seeing the new vet today we were told "Oh, we can do a super special poop test for $200 and we'll get you the results on Monday." When we asked if there was anything we could do now, they said no. Right now me and my partner are each spending about 2 hours a day cleaning cat poo poo, we have to lock the cat in the bathroom overnight so he won't pee on the bed and he meows very loudly and is very upset about it for a while, so I'm woken up several times throughout the night. We might call the vet again tomorrow and ask about soluble fiber.

I have no idea how he is so energetic and so poopy at the same time. You would think he was a Tron motorcycle leaving a trail of poo poo from the last mess we just cleaned.

Somehow we're able to stay patient with him through all this. I think if he was a less cute cat it would be more difficult.

PhantomPayne
Aug 8, 2017


Hello thread, I'd like to know your opinion, and suggestions regarding my best cat friend, Rarra.

She's a 14 year old cat that started with haematuria and vesical tenesmus about 3 weeks ago, with no other signs or symptoms. As soon as we saw her struggling, we took her to a vet, he did some lab work that showed increased creatinine (3.31 mg/dL), with normal Phosphorus levels (6.5 mmol/L), and no abnormalities in white or red blood cell counts, no fever, or abnormal findings on physical exploration. He told us he suspected that because of her age, she was probably showing signs of chronic kidney disease, and he started her on a prescription kidney diet.

About a week later, we noticed haematuria and vesical tenesmus again, but my parents decided to take her to another vet. On physical exploration she had abdominal pain, with bladder distention, and no fever. She looked at her past lab results, and started a round of antibiotics (Cefalexine QD for 7 days), and ordered her to change to a prescription urinary diet, with instructions for a follow up consult in two weeks. Her haematuria and vesical tenesmus stopped, and we thought all was well, but once again, she started with the same symptoms two days after completing her round of antibiotics. My parents took her to the same vet, who ordered some new blood work, and well, the results weren't too positive. Her creatinine rose to 4.68 mg/dl, and Phosphorus to 8.9 mmol, but her red blood cell count and white blood cell counts were still within normal values. According to the vet, she has anemia, a "very strong" infection, and chronic kidney disease, and she started her on another round of antibiotics (Ceftriaxone, QD for 7 days).

What I find quite odd is that none of the vets suggested we should take a renal ultrasound, and that Vet #2 decided on a second round of antibiotics (despite there being no physical or lab evidence of infection). Anyways, with all that aside, what I'd like to ask you guys is; should we ask for a renal ultrasound? Is it possible that the first round of antibiotics worsened her kidney function? Would you recommend a second round of antibiotics on a patient with the same signs/symptoms/physical findings? Should we suspend her second round of antibiotics, or should we take her for a third opinion?

Thanks for your attention thread! I'm sure my Rarra would also thank you for your help

NosmoKing
Nov 12, 2004

I have a rifle and a frying pan and I know how to use them

Help me Please. My special little guy is not well and trending worse.

You folks helped me when my old cat was Ill before and I really appreciate it. I got another 2ish years of a good friend because I asked.

Iíll give you as much background information as I have. Weíre talking about here is a 12-year-old male neutered American shorthair cat. Towards the beginning of the year he started having rather soft puddly stools. Basically a cow patty.

We took him to the veterinarian and they gave him an examination and couldnít find anything odd. Stool sample had no parasites and blood work looked normal abdomen palpitation was nothing special. They sent us home with a Prescription diet that I canít remember the name of it supposed to be for cats with digestive issues. We also are on a course of steroids. None of this made any difference. We went back in, talk to the vet, they took more blood examined the stool again and sent us back with a hypoallergenic food.

Again, no change.

Now, back again after a bag and a half of food and they suggested x-rays. They also showed nothing. Again, physical exam showed nothing out of the ordinary.

Next suggestion is ultrasound.

I asked if the ultrasound would change the treatment decisions. Basically they said ďnot unless we see cancerĒ.

So, any thoughts? Thoughts on a older cat who has loose stools that are only getting worse and who has now had a few accidents outside the litter box?

His behavior is 100% the same. Loving, fun, playful, cuddly, and a good little guy. Looking to keep him that way as long as I can.

Chainclaw
Feb 14, 2009



We got the results back from the vet, our kitten has Feline Coronavirus, so he's on medication for that. She said the medication is kind of fast and we should expect results by the end of the week. Crossing our fingers he'll be better soon.

Crooked Booty
Apr 2, 2009
arrr

imo the last 3 posters should all get second/third opinions.

NosmoKing
Nov 12, 2004

I have a rifle and a frying pan and I know how to use them

Crooked Booty posted:

imo the last 3 posters should all get second/third opinions.

Iím actually doing that right now!!

FizFashizzle
Mar 30, 2005









What's the minimum age for a flea bath for a puppy?

I'm seeing some things that say after 6 weeks is fine, but other things that say wait until 10-12.

left_unattended
Apr 13, 2009

"The person who seeks all their applause from outside has their happiness in another's keeping."
Dale Carnegie

This dickhead has what feels like a really hard skin tag. It doesn't seem to bother him at all, I didn't scratch at it but from rubbing it gently it definitely seems to be thoroughly attached. It's very small and completely hard. He's acting totally normal, food intake and activity levels have reduced over the last year or so but his weight is stable, I've been assuming he's just getting older and pickier. Obviously if his behaviour changed I'd get him straight to a vet, but should I get them to check it out?

YourCreation
Jan 4, 2004

A little creative surgery helps turn a few sick pets into a new and improved friend!


NosmoKing posted:

So, any thoughts? Thoughts on a older cat who has loose stools that are only getting worse and who has now had a few accidents outside the litter box?

I would get a referral to an internal medicine specialist. Chronic diarrhoea = endoscopy or surgical biopsies. Abdominal ultrasound is probably not going to get you an answer.

YourCreation
Jan 4, 2004

A little creative surgery helps turn a few sick pets into a new and improved friend!


FizFashizzle posted:

What's the minimum age for a flea bath for a puppy?
I'm seeing some things that say after 6 weeks is fine, but other things that say wait until 10-12.

Don't use a flea bath.
1) The risk of reactions are higher
2) They have no lasting effect after the bath
3) They don't really control the flea cycle

If you want a one-off thing then use a Capstar, otherwise use one of the approved topic or oral flea preventative thing. For very small or young puppies you want Frontline Spray which is dosed by weight.

FizFashizzle
Mar 30, 2005









YourCreation posted:

Don't use a flea bath.
1) The risk of reactions are higher
2) They have no lasting effect after the bath
3) They don't really control the flea cycle

If you want a one-off thing then use a Capstar, otherwise use one of the approved topic or oral flea preventative thing. For very small or young puppies you want Frontline Spray which is dosed by weight.

Thanks!

LuiCypher
Apr 24, 2010

NERF THIS!


YourCreation posted:

I would get a referral to an internal medicine specialist. Chronic diarrhoea = endoscopy or surgical biopsies. Abdominal ultrasound is probably not going to get you an answer.

Seconding this. An ultrasound is very useful if your pet has acute gastrointestinal issues, probably less so for mild symptoms over an extended duration. I just took my 8yo calico to the emergency vet ON MY BIRTHDAY because she wasn't eating, had runny/mucus poops, and was vomiting spittle - the ultrasound helped us to confirm that it was colitis and not pancreatitis, which has nearly the exact same symptoms and claimed one of our cats a few years ago. She's also going to be on a hydrolyzed protein diet for the near future.

Luckily, colitis is very treatable on an outpatient basis. Pancreatitis, on the other hand, requires loads of time and money to treat (the cat will essentially need 24/7 monitoring, IV fluids for hydration, and a nasal tube for feeding for several days - that gets expensive fast).

That being said, even the emergency vet recommended that she see an internal medicine specialist for an endoscopy/colonoscopy in order to rule out cancer and confirm if she's going to have IBD for the rest of her life.

a foolish pianist
May 6, 2007

(bi)cyclic mutation



So my partner and I found this young gentleman in our neighborhood a couple of weeks ago. He's probably about 5 months old, 6-odd pounds:



We took him to the vet straight away to check for a chip, and he had none, so we've decided to keep him. He got his first round of shots, and then a few days later, while he was asleep and drooling, we noticed a little pink stain on the blanket he was sleeping on. We took him back to the vet, and they found a couple of ulcers on his tongue, which they figured was a virus, so they gave us some immune booster food additive and told us to keep an eye on him. This tongue issue cleared up, but then his eyes started getting crusty and swollen:



So we took him back, and they again figured some kind of virus, and they gave us a cone, some erythromycin eye ointment, and some saline wash, and told us to put a line of the ointment in his eyes every day. Two days later, he was looking worse instead of better:



So we took him back to the vet. They thought maybe he was sensitive to the erythromycin, so they gave us a different antibiotic ointment. That was yesterday, and here he is today:



His eyes are still looking quite terrible. He's been to the vet last Thursday, this Monday, and yesterday (this Wednesday).

I've got a couple of questions:

Primary: what kind of timeline should we be expecting for this eye swelling to start to go down with antibiotic ointment and cleaning with clean cottonballs with saline? Should I take him back to the vet tomorrow? Or should I just follow the ointment application schedule and be patient?

Secondary:
1. Is this sequence of vet visits sensible? Should we take him to a different vet, some kind of cat eye specialist? I'm in Atlanta, Ga. if that makes a difference.
2. Are there tests for what this might be? A cat allergy test? A way to check for a virus that might be causing this?
3. What should I be asking the vet when I talk to them tomorrow?

Bioshuffle
Feb 10, 2011

No good deed goes unpunished



Any tips for getting a stool sample for a cat when two of them share the litter box? I have 2 litter boxes, which makes it even more confusing.

YourCreation
Jan 4, 2004

A little creative surgery helps turn a few sick pets into a new and improved friend!


a foolish pianist posted:

Primary: what kind of timeline should we be expecting for this eye swelling to start to go down with antibiotic ointment and cleaning with clean cottonballs with saline? Should I take him back to the vet tomorrow? Or should I just follow the ointment application schedule and be patient?

Secondary:
1. Is this sequence of vet visits sensible? Should we take him to a different vet, some kind of cat eye specialist? I'm in Atlanta, Ga. if that makes a difference.
2. Are there tests for what this might be? A cat allergy test? A way to check for a virus that might be causing this?
3. What should I be asking the vet when I talk to them tomorrow?

A second opinion wouldn't be the worst in the world if you don't feel like you're getting anywhere. This kitty needs lots of eye lube and to be checked for corneal ulceration. It's probably some form of feline URT virus. When we see tongue ulceration we usually think Calicivirus but they can also have mixed infections. There is testing available, but it's unlikely to change treatment. Essentially some stain in the eyes will show if there is ulceration, which is definitely painful and requires oral antibiotics and drops rather than ointment. If the eyes are really inflamed and nasty then lubrication will help. FeLV/FIV testing would also be a good shout.

Steps are to rule in/out corneal ulceration, provide appropriate pain relief, lubrication, and antibiotic therapy if necessary. Once daily ointment isn't going to do much in the face of severe disease.

Is he eating? If not, get on that ASAP.

YourCreation
Jan 4, 2004

A little creative surgery helps turn a few sick pets into a new and improved friend!


Bioshuffle posted:

Any tips for getting a stool sample for a cat when two of them share the litter box? I have 2 litter boxes, which makes it even more confusing.

Option 1: Separate them for 24 hours. Probably your most sensible option.
Option 2: Feed the one you need a sample from some small pieces of children's crayon (non-toxic). The poop with the crayon in it is the sample you need.

Real answer: cats sharing litterboxes share everything (including parasites), so you can probably get away with just grabbing three days worth of whatever poop you find (multiple days improves your chance of a real result due to intermittent shedding).

Bioshuffle
Feb 10, 2011

No good deed goes unpunished



Thanks! Do I really need to store the fecal sample in the fridge as the vet instructed? I find the whole idea of doing that so very disturbing. Could I just store it in ice or drive up a fresh sample instead?

Slugworth
Feb 18, 2001

If two grown men can't make a pervert happy for a few minutes in order to watch a film about zombies, then maybe we should all just move to Iran!


Bioshuffle posted:

Thanks! Do I really need to store the fecal sample in the fridge as the vet instructed? I find the whole idea of doing that so very disturbing. Could I just store it in ice or drive up a fresh sample instead?
The fresher the better, and refrigeration can help towards that end, but it's honestly not that big of a deal - For reference, Idexx (one of the largest vet labs) has a program where people can collect a stool sample at home and then ship it via USPS overnight in an unrefrigerated box.

The Great Outdoors
Aug 11, 2010


Hello,

I am looking for some help wtih a behavioral problem im having with one of my cats. Please let me know if there is a better place to post this. I have 2 cats about 4 years old, male and female, both outdoor cats (i only let them out at night usually for about 4 hours a day). A few months ago my male was experiencing a partially blocked urinal track and sludge in urine which thankfully was solved with a diet change. During (and before) his recovery when he was having trouble urinating he was ignoring the litter box and often peeing in random corners of my house, which i was mostly letting him get away with due to his condition. Anyway, for about 2 months after his recovery he was acting completely normally but i noticed one afternoon that he had been peeing in one corner of my house under a table and not always using the litter box. I then cleaned it, have tried bringing a litter box into that room, rearranging the 3 (now 4) litterboxes, and gating off the room that hes been peeing in. The results over the last few weeks is that he will constantly just pick a new random corner of my house to pee in, completely ignoring the (clean) litterboxes. I've tried everything i can think of, and cant really see a pattern or reason for his behavior, he will use the litter box some of the time, but will sometimes ignore it even when they are freshly cleaned only hours ago and completely unused. Open to any and all ideas anyone might have to solve this problem as i really dont want to have to give him away so please let me know, thanks!

Pyroclastic
Jan 4, 2010

It's not science if someone doesn't get hurt.

My cat started limping and struggling to sit down yesterday, so I took him to the nearest ER vet. After sitting in the parking lot for 7 hours and him peeing in my passenger footwell, they finally examined him and diagnosed a broken tail (3rd vertebra from the base). Nothing they can really do for it except pain meds, unless he starts chewing or otherwise hurting the tail, which may require amputation. Big problem is he's largely an outdoor cat and has, for the past 12 years we've had him, always used the outdoors (mostly our garden boxes, I think) as his litterbox. Trying to keep him in for 2 weeks to give his tail a chance to heal and train on litter is going to be a real challenge.

They had to sedate him to get x-rays (he's 'feisty' in the words of the vet), and gave him a 3-day pain med shot. He was acting pretty weird when we got home, and I just figured it was lingering effects of the sedation, but he's still a little weird today. He'll just sit in the hallway facing a wall. When he's laying in my lap or on the bed, he just...stares. He doesn't seem to close his eyes (though he will when I put my hand on his forehead). Is he just so stoned from the pain med that he doesn't close his eyes when resting?

Also, what price should I expect for an amputation (Western Washington state)? The place I went to yesterday charged me over $600 for the x-rays, sedation, and meds, and I'm probably going to call around to other vets if he needs to get the tail lopped off.

vaginadeathgrip
Jun 18, 2003

all them bitches can't handle my sassy ass mouth

Question about meds. Kitty was put on a liquid steroid for FOREVER but the method of grabbing her and injecting it into her face is terrible for the both of us, and i just canít do that to her for that long. The drug is at room temperature, so I was wondering how bad it is to mix it into her food that she eats all of, but grazes on over a few hours. The smell of it isnít good so itís hard to only give her a little food, itís easier to mask the smell with more food.

Sheís getting all of the drug but not all at once. Just wondering how problematic that is. The vet wants it all at once, the pharmacist said what Iím doing is fine as long as she eats all of it.

YourCreation
Jan 4, 2004

A little creative surgery helps turn a few sick pets into a new and improved friend!


What's the medication, prednislone? If so, just get tablets. Unreliable steroid administration is problematic for proper disease control. Also, long term steroids are suboptimal, but necessary in some cases. What is your kitty being treated for?

vaginadeathgrip
Jun 18, 2003

all them bitches can't handle my sassy ass mouth

YourCreation posted:

What's the medication, prednislone? If so, just get tablets. Unreliable steroid administration is problematic for proper disease control. Also, long term steroids are suboptimal, but necessary in some cases. What is your kitty being treated for?

Itís budesonide. I was a little surprised when the vet told me she would be on them for life because I had read they usually taper down. She thinks Kitty has IBD but itís possible lymphoma. I also asked if Iím just prolonging things by not having an endoscopy to get more definitive answers, but she didnít seem to think it was necessary.

Tablets would present a similar problem since I would have to grab her and stick it in her mouth and Iím trying to avoid that because itís so stressful and then she becomes mistrusting.

YourCreation
Jan 4, 2004

A little creative surgery helps turn a few sick pets into a new and improved friend!


vaginadeathgrip posted:

Itís budesonide. I was a little surprised when the vet told me she would be on them for life because I had read they usually taper down. She thinks Kitty has IBD but itís possible lymphoma. I also asked if Iím just prolonging things by not having an endoscopy to get more definitive answers, but she didnít seem to think it was necessary.

Tablets would present a similar problem since I would have to grab her and stick it in her mouth and Iím trying to avoid that because itís so stressful and then she becomes mistrusting.

Well that's just lazy. Considering neither of those diseases can be definitely diagnosed WITHOUT diagnostics, I would say go for it. If you have the finances and the willingness then you are well within your rights to ask for a referral to an internal medicine specialist. Some IBD kitties can be managed on diet alone, and there are other lookalike enteropathies, so I would go get you some diagnostics.

Destro
Dec 29, 2003

time to wake up


So a year ago I took my cat in after she had a coughing fit and the vet said she has feline asthma, and started her on prednisone at 5 mg twice a day for like two weeks or something and we tapered down to 1 5mg tablet every other day for the past year since then. She got worse and I took her in and he described two options. The one I'm going to start doing is 5mg pred in the morning and evening for 3 weeks then down to 1 5mg tablet each day. However he said that you could also get fluticasone with the aerocat inhaler but that the fluticasone would be about $300 and only last 6-8 weeks. The cost of the Aerokat itself is not an issue, but 300 for that amount of time is very steep, however I looked online and it would appear you can get fluticasone from Canada with a prescription for much cheaper. as in $100 or less which I would be willing to do as with the inhaler it seems there would be less chance of bad side effects. So I'm probably going to talk to my vet about that, but would anyone know of any legit Canadian pharmacies that I could order from?

I just want to do the best I can for my cat I've had her for 13 years and this whole thing makes me sad.

whocares8310
Sep 22, 2010

Sir, I think it's pronounced nook-ya-ler.


Hi,

I have a dog with a very odd scabby area on his hind leg near the hip. It is almost in a perfect ring and slightly raised with the "ring" being a little bare with hair inside and outside the ring. I've looked into pictures of what ringworm looks like but it doesn't have the bald patchiness or redness that I see with ringworm pictures. Is this cause for concern or just a very very odd-looking cut that just so happens to be in a circle? Below is a preliminary photo. I'll take more once I have a second set of hands to help part the hair while photos are taken.

Thanks for any insight.

Only registered members can see post attachments!

YourCreation
Jan 4, 2004

A little creative surgery helps turn a few sick pets into a new and improved friend!


Destro posted:

So a year ago I took my cat in after she had a coughing fit and the vet said she has feline asthma, and started her on prednisone at 5 mg twice a day for like two weeks or something and we tapered down to 1 5mg tablet every other day for the past year since then. She got worse and I took her in and he described two options. The one I'm going to start doing is 5mg pred in the morning and evening for 3 weeks then down to 1 5mg tablet each day. However he said that you could also get fluticasone with the aerocat inhaler but that the fluticasone would be about $300 and only last 6-8 weeks. The cost of the Aerokat itself is not an issue, but 300 for that amount of time is very steep, however I looked online and it would appear you can get fluticasone from Canada with a prescription for much cheaper. as in $100 or less which I would be willing to do as with the inhaler it seems there would be less chance of bad side effects. So I'm probably going to talk to my vet about that, but would anyone know of any legit Canadian pharmacies that I could order from?

I just want to do the best I can for my cat I've had her for 13 years and this whole thing makes me sad.

That's insane - it's £40 here in the UK. Hopefully some of our Canadian friends can help. Have they confirmed allergic airway disease? Are you doing environmental/dust management? Any lungworm prevention? Just some additional thoughts...

whocares8310 posted:

Hi,

I have a dog with a very odd scabby area on his hind leg near the hip. It is almost in a perfect ring and slightly raised with the "ring" being a little bare with hair inside and outside the ring. I've looked into pictures of what ringworm looks like but it doesn't have the bald patchiness or redness that I see with ringworm pictures. Is this cause for concern or just a very very odd-looking cut that just so happens to be in a circle? Below is a preliminary photo. I'll take more once I have a second set of hands to help part the hair while photos are taken.

Thanks for any insight.

Definitely looks suspicious. I would treat it as potentially infectious and get it confirmed at your vets. Could be ringworm, could be other fungal or bacterial.

No. 1 Juicy Boi
Jun 1, 2003

#1 JUICY BOY



Buglord

We adopted an absolute perfect pup about 3 weeks ago who was heartworm positive at the shelter. I don't have experience with heartworm treatment, but we're sticking closely to the plan (no exercise, antibiotics for the first 30 days, she's on Heartgard and after two months of that she'll get her treatment shots, then 30 more days of strict rest)

My question is, at what point should I worry about the symptoms? Googling is mostly just showing what to look for BEFORE heartworms. She has some heavy breathing and coughing now and then, which I gather is a normal side effect of the worms. Should I only call the vet if I notice she isn't eating or blood in stool/urine or extreme lethargy etc?

Edit-- to clarify, she went to the vet last weekend for a check-up and they said she looked good.

No. 1 Juicy Boi fucked around with this message at 02:19 on Dec 11, 2020

Torpor
Oct 20, 2008

lmao look at that dead muslim

love da' troops!

I have a cat with lymphoma and he has lost a bunch of weight. What is the best way to give a cat calories? I have tried high calorie pastes and it is malty and not appetizing for a cat, is there some kind of easily administered extremely caloric thing to give to a cat to get them serious calories?

Edit: a McDonaldís burger has better results than hillís diet a/d or whatever super palatable prescription food.

Torpor fucked around with this message at 06:40 on Dec 20, 2020

Slugworth
Feb 18, 2001

If two grown men can't make a pervert happy for a few minutes in order to watch a film about zombies, then maybe we should all just move to Iran!


Torpor posted:

I have a cat with lymphoma and he has lost a bunch of weight. What is the best way to give a cat calories? I have tried high calorie pastes and it is malty and not appetizing for a cat, is there some kind of easily administered extremely caloric thing to give to a cat to get them serious calories?

Edit: a McDonald’s burger has better results than hill’s diet a/d or whatever super palatable prescription food.
If he's still got an appetite of some sort, and just needs something a little more tempting, see if your vet carries royal canin recovery. I mean, there's obviously tons of palatable non prescription foods out there, but recovery is calorie dense and I've seen really sick, inappetant animals go for it.

YourCreation
Jan 4, 2004

A little creative surgery helps turn a few sick pets into a new and improved friend!


Is he on chemotherapy/steroids/any other meds? How is his appetite? Any idea where the lymphoma is? Might try some B12 injections as they can be deficient with GI lymphoma.

Torpor
Oct 20, 2008

lmao look at that dead muslim

love da' troops!

YourCreation posted:

Is he on chemotherapy/steroids/any other meds? How is his appetite? Any idea where the lymphoma is? Might try some B12 injections as they can be deficient with GI lymphoma.

He has a great appetite. Heís on a bunch of pred and antibiotics. Iíve taken him to two vets. He has an inoperable tumor and heís anemic, with eosinophils and some other antibody sky high, stratospheric. But he is at half weight.

I could probably take him to a veterinary oncologist but Iím not sure if that is; a) reasonable, b) economical.

Edit: it just sucks, he has great energy and great appetite but his body is just betraying him and heís wasting away.

Torpor fucked around with this message at 07:32 on Dec 24, 2020

YourCreation
Jan 4, 2004

A little creative surgery helps turn a few sick pets into a new and improved friend!


Lymphoma is typically more of a disseminated disease in cats rather than a solitary tumour. An oncology consult may be a good idea as there are other/adjunct chemotherapy meds you can use to help.

Plank Walker
Aug 11, 2005


Any cat owners here have any experience with radioactive iodine therapy for hyperthyroidism? Our cat Tucker is scheduled for the procedure next week. The post-treatment protocol seems pretty strict so wondering what the risks are to me if I give in to his charms and spend more than the allotted 30 min/day with him, especially since he will have just been back from the hospital for 4 days and likely dying for attention.

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YourCreation
Jan 4, 2004

A little creative surgery helps turn a few sick pets into a new and improved friend!


I-131 is a pain in the rear end but really is the best treatment for hyperthyroid cats. The way radioactive iodine works is a fun abuse of physiology. Right now your cat has overactive abnormal thyroid tissue that absorbs iodine and spits out thyroid hormone constantly. Your cat's normal thyroid tissue is suppressed and not absorbing iodine because it senses too much thyroid hormone, which is the usual feedback mechanism. Because only the abnormal tissue is absorbing iodine, it absorbs all of the radioactive iodine and gets killed off. I bring this up because the risk to you is that your cat may be excreting some of the radioactive isotope and you may absorb some and damage your normal, healthy thyroid tissue.

Your cat may be needy or frustrated for a bit, but the long term pay off is no more daily medications and frequent vet visits for blood tests. Do the hard stuff now and you will stay safe and have a happy kitty.

YourCreation fucked around with this message at 11:19 on Jan 6, 2021

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