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YourCreation
Jan 4, 2004

A little creative surgery helps turn a few sick pets into a new and improved friend!


TheBigAristotle posted:

Reggie survived surgery and he's home with me now, he's so full of energy, it kills me to know that he can't just fight it off.

Is there anything I can do to improve his situation? Far as nutrition or supplements of any kind? Right now they just have him on painkillers and antibiotics for his scar

Sorry to hear about Reggie. Not a whole lot I'm afraid. Just focus on him enjoying all of the dog things he likes until he's not able to do those things anymore 8(

It's always a crap situation - you often don't find out until they're critically unwell and then you have to make a rush decision about surgery or not. Re: chemo, you don't have to go full out. You could consider referral to an oncologist do discuss palliative care measures to extend quality of life, or even have your veterinarian email and oncologist to see if there is anything they might be able to offer at your own practice.

How was the hemangiosarcoma diagnosis reached? Have you had histology results back yet or is it based on presumption?

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YourCreation
Jan 4, 2004

A little creative surgery helps turn a few sick pets into a new and improved friend!


Dixville posted:

Edit: you might also ask the doctor about getting a mild sedative like trazodone if he seems too anxious or antsy. Just for the first couple weeks or so

Trazodone is king for anxiety, beaten only by my favourite combination trazapentin.

YourCreation
Jan 4, 2004

A little creative surgery helps turn a few sick pets into a new and improved friend!


Just to clarify - have they confirmed the diagnosis by sending the spleen out to a lab or is this based on best guess +/- some X-rays of the chest? I only ask because ~2/3 of the time there is cancer and ~1/3 of the time it is benign (roughly).

YourCreation
Jan 4, 2004

A little creative surgery helps turn a few sick pets into a new and improved friend!


Aye, could be an underlying chronic gastropathy/gastroenteropathy (IBD, atypical Addisons, etc) that needs some investigating once all of this is over.

YourCreation
Jan 4, 2004

A little creative surgery helps turn a few sick pets into a new and improved friend!


LostMy2010Accnt posted:

I have a soon to be 10 year old, short haired black cat whose third eyelids have been showing for over a month now. I've taken her several times to the vet to get a physical, blood-work and x-rays taken and everything has come back positive. The only thing the doctor was concerned about was her weight which she's slowly been putting back on. Her behavior is normal, no changes in habits, her appetite is good, she's drinking her normal amounts of water, and was given a topical de-wormer. I'm confused as to why this is still a thing and concerned of what it could be, but my local vet has said everything is fine. Could their be other issues to this like allergies? Any help is appreciated, thank you.

Could be Haws Syndrome

YourCreation
Jan 4, 2004

A little creative surgery helps turn a few sick pets into a new and improved friend!


nulldev1ce posted:

Apologies if this has been asked and answered a thousand times before. Chronic kidney disease is pretty common in cats, as I understand it.

So, ours was recently diagnosed, based on a big increase in drinking water and peeing. Blood/urine samples confirmed it, and they prescribed the special food. My family's been down this road with other cats in the past...they hate the damned food. Ours seems to be okay with the dry, but she won't touch the wet stuff, even if we drizzle tuna water/oil on it.

I understand that the special food is lower in protein -- the first ingredient listed is water -- so my question is, would it be OK if we gave her a heavily-watered-down, smaller quantity of her old canned food that she DOES like? It seems counterintuitive to feed her *only* dry food when she's already thirsty...

The main point of the diet is protein and phosphorus restriction. There are a TON of kidney prescription diets these days, so try some variety and see what she likes. It's literally the only evidence based thing you can do to prolong her life/quality of life.

YourCreation
Jan 4, 2004

A little creative surgery helps turn a few sick pets into a new and improved friend!


Yeah being a consumer and making decisions is not easy with all of the marketing and crazies out there. I work in emergency/critical care medicine so the feelings on CKD management may have moved on without my notice.

YourCreation
Jan 4, 2004

A little creative surgery helps turn a few sick pets into a new and improved friend!


Slugworth posted:

Very jealous, I've never gotten to be part of a c-section. Everyone I work with assures me it's actual hell, but still, I bet the first one is fun.

I have no love for this procedure

YourCreation
Jan 4, 2004

A little creative surgery helps turn a few sick pets into a new and improved friend!


NosmoKing posted:

So, any thoughts? Thoughts on a older cat who has loose stools that are only getting worse and who has now had a few accidents outside the litter box?

I would get a referral to an internal medicine specialist. Chronic diarrhoea = endoscopy or surgical biopsies. Abdominal ultrasound is probably not going to get you an answer.

YourCreation
Jan 4, 2004

A little creative surgery helps turn a few sick pets into a new and improved friend!


FizFashizzle posted:

What's the minimum age for a flea bath for a puppy?
I'm seeing some things that say after 6 weeks is fine, but other things that say wait until 10-12.

Don't use a flea bath.
1) The risk of reactions are higher
2) They have no lasting effect after the bath
3) They don't really control the flea cycle

If you want a one-off thing then use a Capstar, otherwise use one of the approved topic or oral flea preventative thing. For very small or young puppies you want Frontline Spray which is dosed by weight.

YourCreation
Jan 4, 2004

A little creative surgery helps turn a few sick pets into a new and improved friend!


a foolish pianist posted:

Primary: what kind of timeline should we be expecting for this eye swelling to start to go down with antibiotic ointment and cleaning with clean cottonballs with saline? Should I take him back to the vet tomorrow? Or should I just follow the ointment application schedule and be patient?

Secondary:
1. Is this sequence of vet visits sensible? Should we take him to a different vet, some kind of cat eye specialist? I'm in Atlanta, Ga. if that makes a difference.
2. Are there tests for what this might be? A cat allergy test? A way to check for a virus that might be causing this?
3. What should I be asking the vet when I talk to them tomorrow?

A second opinion wouldn't be the worst in the world if you don't feel like you're getting anywhere. This kitty needs lots of eye lube and to be checked for corneal ulceration. It's probably some form of feline URT virus. When we see tongue ulceration we usually think Calicivirus but they can also have mixed infections. There is testing available, but it's unlikely to change treatment. Essentially some stain in the eyes will show if there is ulceration, which is definitely painful and requires oral antibiotics and drops rather than ointment. If the eyes are really inflamed and nasty then lubrication will help. FeLV/FIV testing would also be a good shout.

Steps are to rule in/out corneal ulceration, provide appropriate pain relief, lubrication, and antibiotic therapy if necessary. Once daily ointment isn't going to do much in the face of severe disease.

Is he eating? If not, get on that ASAP.

YourCreation
Jan 4, 2004

A little creative surgery helps turn a few sick pets into a new and improved friend!


Bioshuffle posted:

Any tips for getting a stool sample for a cat when two of them share the litter box? I have 2 litter boxes, which makes it even more confusing.

Option 1: Separate them for 24 hours. Probably your most sensible option.
Option 2: Feed the one you need a sample from some small pieces of children's crayon (non-toxic). The poop with the crayon in it is the sample you need.

Real answer: cats sharing litterboxes share everything (including parasites), so you can probably get away with just grabbing three days worth of whatever poop you find (multiple days improves your chance of a real result due to intermittent shedding).

YourCreation
Jan 4, 2004

A little creative surgery helps turn a few sick pets into a new and improved friend!


What's the medication, prednislone? If so, just get tablets. Unreliable steroid administration is problematic for proper disease control. Also, long term steroids are suboptimal, but necessary in some cases. What is your kitty being treated for?

YourCreation
Jan 4, 2004

A little creative surgery helps turn a few sick pets into a new and improved friend!


vaginadeathgrip posted:

Itís budesonide. I was a little surprised when the vet told me she would be on them for life because I had read they usually taper down. She thinks Kitty has IBD but itís possible lymphoma. I also asked if Iím just prolonging things by not having an endoscopy to get more definitive answers, but she didnít seem to think it was necessary.

Tablets would present a similar problem since I would have to grab her and stick it in her mouth and Iím trying to avoid that because itís so stressful and then she becomes mistrusting.

Well that's just lazy. Considering neither of those diseases can be definitely diagnosed WITHOUT diagnostics, I would say go for it. If you have the finances and the willingness then you are well within your rights to ask for a referral to an internal medicine specialist. Some IBD kitties can be managed on diet alone, and there are other lookalike enteropathies, so I would go get you some diagnostics.

YourCreation
Jan 4, 2004

A little creative surgery helps turn a few sick pets into a new and improved friend!


Destro posted:

So a year ago I took my cat in after she had a coughing fit and the vet said she has feline asthma, and started her on prednisone at 5 mg twice a day for like two weeks or something and we tapered down to 1 5mg tablet every other day for the past year since then. She got worse and I took her in and he described two options. The one I'm going to start doing is 5mg pred in the morning and evening for 3 weeks then down to 1 5mg tablet each day. However he said that you could also get fluticasone with the aerocat inhaler but that the fluticasone would be about $300 and only last 6-8 weeks. The cost of the Aerokat itself is not an issue, but 300 for that amount of time is very steep, however I looked online and it would appear you can get fluticasone from Canada with a prescription for much cheaper. as in $100 or less which I would be willing to do as with the inhaler it seems there would be less chance of bad side effects. So I'm probably going to talk to my vet about that, but would anyone know of any legit Canadian pharmacies that I could order from?

I just want to do the best I can for my cat I've had her for 13 years and this whole thing makes me sad.

That's insane - it's £40 here in the UK. Hopefully some of our Canadian friends can help. Have they confirmed allergic airway disease? Are you doing environmental/dust management? Any lungworm prevention? Just some additional thoughts...

whocares8310 posted:

Hi,

I have a dog with a very odd scabby area on his hind leg near the hip. It is almost in a perfect ring and slightly raised with the "ring" being a little bare with hair inside and outside the ring. I've looked into pictures of what ringworm looks like but it doesn't have the bald patchiness or redness that I see with ringworm pictures. Is this cause for concern or just a very very odd-looking cut that just so happens to be in a circle? Below is a preliminary photo. I'll take more once I have a second set of hands to help part the hair while photos are taken.

Thanks for any insight.

Definitely looks suspicious. I would treat it as potentially infectious and get it confirmed at your vets. Could be ringworm, could be other fungal or bacterial.

YourCreation
Jan 4, 2004

A little creative surgery helps turn a few sick pets into a new and improved friend!


Is he on chemotherapy/steroids/any other meds? How is his appetite? Any idea where the lymphoma is? Might try some B12 injections as they can be deficient with GI lymphoma.

YourCreation
Jan 4, 2004

A little creative surgery helps turn a few sick pets into a new and improved friend!


Lymphoma is typically more of a disseminated disease in cats rather than a solitary tumour. An oncology consult may be a good idea as there are other/adjunct chemotherapy meds you can use to help.

YourCreation
Jan 4, 2004

A little creative surgery helps turn a few sick pets into a new and improved friend!


I-131 is a pain in the rear end but really is the best treatment for hyperthyroid cats. The way radioactive iodine works is a fun abuse of physiology. Right now your cat has overactive abnormal thyroid tissue that absorbs iodine and spits out thyroid hormone constantly. Your cat's normal thyroid tissue is suppressed and not absorbing iodine because it senses too much thyroid hormone, which is the usual feedback mechanism. Because only the abnormal tissue is absorbing iodine, it absorbs all of the radioactive iodine and gets killed off. I bring this up because the risk to you is that your cat may be excreting some of the radioactive isotope and you may absorb some and damage your normal, healthy thyroid tissue.

Your cat may be needy or frustrated for a bit, but the long term pay off is no more daily medications and frequent vet visits for blood tests. Do the hard stuff now and you will stay safe and have a happy kitty.

YourCreation fucked around with this message at 11:19 on Jan 6, 2021

YourCreation
Jan 4, 2004

A little creative surgery helps turn a few sick pets into a new and improved friend!


Gotta keep em separated.
The MPS suits are good.

YourCreation
Jan 4, 2004

A little creative surgery helps turn a few sick pets into a new and improved friend!


SSH IT ZOMBIE posted:

So uh, my cat got super sick.

I think you've been let down a little bit. Were you referred to a medicine specialist or just for some imaging? What your cat really needed was some appropriate diagnostics and probably endoscopy with biopsies. Sounds like they sampled a lymph node and it was reactive, which obviously it would be because your cat's intestines are super pissed off. Yes you can do surgical biopsies of the intestine but that's probably unnecessary. At this stage you don't really have a diagnosis yet but we have seen a response to steroids, so it could be inflammatory bowel disease, it could be lymphoma, or anything in between. Your options are:

1) Get a referral to a medicine specialist for a proper work up and diagnosis. If it's IBD it can sometimes be managed with diet changes after some steroid use. Your kitty probably could use some B12 supplementation too. If you have the funds then do this one.
2) Continue with steroids and try and taper off and see the response (not sure what dose he's on but don't stop them suddenly if he's been on them >7 days).
3) Continue steroids for life but deal with the inevitable side effects like diabetes

Steroids typically drive hunger, which means your cat should be hungry. You can try EzyPill or Pill Putty or even shaking the pill in a bag of Dreamies to give it some seasoning. Some cats will eat a row of Dreamies with a pill hidden in there somewhere.

Good luck and let us know how he does.

YourCreation
Jan 4, 2004

A little creative surgery helps turn a few sick pets into a new and improved friend!


I would not do surgery. I would go for an internal medicine consultation and get some multi-disciplinary input before doing anything else. If you let me know what city you're in I can see what clinics would be best in your area.

YourCreation
Jan 4, 2004

A little creative surgery helps turn a few sick pets into a new and improved friend!


SSH IT ZOMBIE posted:

Rochester, NY

https://find.vetspecialists.com/sea...1okRHuYlQfwfAFo

Looks like there are two nearby. I would ask your vet for a referral and you can get an estimate too.

YourCreation
Jan 4, 2004

A little creative surgery helps turn a few sick pets into a new and improved friend!


empty whippet box posted:

cheeto is at the vet, we are waiting to hear back from them. the vet seemed to think he probably just strained too hard trying to poop, so it's likely JUST constipation. gonna be a long couple hours though. a saintly goon has made sure that the costs are covered, for which I will be forever grateful. this community is really amazing sometimes.

More likely he has a bit of cystitis and you just saw him straining to urinate for longer periods of time. Hopefully with a bit of pain relief and time he'll feel much better 8)

YourCreation
Jan 4, 2004

A little creative surgery helps turn a few sick pets into a new and improved friend!


YeahTubaMike posted:

Can cats fake sick?

Explain.

YourCreation
Jan 4, 2004

A little creative surgery helps turn a few sick pets into a new and improved friend!


Just wanted to double check as people in the UK use the word "sick" as a replacement for vomit. There aren't any fakers as far as I am aware, at least not in cats.

YourCreation
Jan 4, 2004

A little creative surgery helps turn a few sick pets into a new and improved friend!


Sorry to hear that Reik 8(
You could consider oral ondansetron - it's a lot more effective anti-nausea medication than Cerenia is.

YourCreation
Jan 4, 2004

A little creative surgery helps turn a few sick pets into a new and improved friend!


Our current data shows that maropitant (Cerenia) is a good anti-vomiting drug, but may not control nausea as well as we thought. On the other hand, Ondansetron controls both nausea and vomiting effectively. It can certainly be used long term and our medicine team likes it a lot for our sicker chronic cases.

Steroids will certainly go a long way it sounds, but my medicine is 99% ICU these days rather than chronic care.

YourCreation
Jan 4, 2004

A little creative surgery helps turn a few sick pets into a new and improved friend!


Pedestrian Xing posted:

How fast do feline resorptive lesions happen? My cat needed to be sedated to biopsy a nasal mass and my vet suggested doing a dental at the same time since it would only cost a little more. She found two severely decayed teeth and removed them and he's bounced back wonderfully. What's odd is that he had a normal exam in November with nothing unusual noted. It it possible everything looked normal then?

Rads:


Most feline dental disease is hidden under the gums which is why dental radiographs are so important. Most will just tolerate the discomfort.

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YourCreation
Jan 4, 2004

A little creative surgery helps turn a few sick pets into a new and improved friend!


You need to get your kitty back to the vets. A cat who is not eating is a ticking time bomb for getting worst (hepatic lipidosis). It may be a viral flare up, but could be things like pancreatitis, pneumonia, UTI, etc. Cats can also purr to self soothe so it doesn't necessarily mean he's feeling good.

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