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Mister Facetious
Apr 21, 2007


You're Goddamned right I support Medicare for all.







Bollock Monkey posted:

Suggest me your favourite meals made with shelf stable ingredients - my new fridge is bust and won't be fixed til Monday at the earliest. So far it's veg chilli, veg curry, pasta... but I'm feeling uninspired for the rest of the week and also for lunches. Too used to being able to store leftovers and things!

Here's a rice recipe that only uses shelf-stable ingredients aside from the chinese bacon and green onion.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o53wSa7DxhY

Ingredient amounts in the show notes below.

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Discussion Quorum
Dec 5, 2002
Armchair Philistine


I got a new carbon steel skillet (a DeBuyer Mineral B). I tried this out years ago and ditched it and because the seasoning just seemed so fragile. But I'm trying to be conscious of disposal culture and PFAS and blah blah so I figured I'd give it another shot.

I washed it and seasoned it, upside down, in a 475F oven with grapeseed oil for an hour. I let it cool, then heated it up with a thin layer of grapeseed oil in the pan until it smoked (the method given in the instructions).

I then cooked bacon in the pan, followed by eggs. The eggs stuck slightly but otherwise it worked fine. I definitely lost some color after cleaning with hot water, though.

Last night, I cooked a smashburger in the pan. Boiled some hot water in the pan to clean off some stuck bits and then did another round of stove top seasoning. Then bacon and more eggs. The eggs stuck more than the last time, but came out with hot water and a little scraping.

I am now left with this:



To me, it looks like every time I put liquid in the pan I lose most of the seasoning up to the waterline. This is what drove me nuts last time. Am I overreacting? Should I maybe give it a soap and water wash (it looks "dirty" but feels smooth and a wet paper towel comes away pretty clean) and a few more seasoning rounds?

Khizan
Jul 30, 2013




Does anybody have any recommendations for a lactose-free boxed macaroni and cheese? My seven year old nephew just got diagnosed with lactose intolerance and this is the one thing he's requested that we've been unable to replicate for him.

Mister Facetious
Apr 21, 2007


You're Goddamned right I support Medicare for all.







Discussion Quorum posted:

I got a new carbon steel skillet (a DeBuyer Mineral B). I tried this out years ago and ditched it and because the seasoning just seemed so fragile. But I'm trying to be conscious of disposal culture and PFAS and blah blah so I figured I'd give it another shot.
I washed it and seasoned it, upside down, in a 475F oven with grapeseed oil for an hour. I let it cool, then heated it up with a thin layer of grapeseed oil in the pan until it smoked (the method given in the instructions).
I then cooked bacon in the pan, followed by eggs. The eggs stuck slightly but otherwise it worked fine. I definitely lost some color after cleaning with hot water, though.
Last night, I cooked a smashburger in the pan. Boiled some hot water in the pan to clean off some stuck bits and then did another round of stove top seasoning. Then bacon and more eggs. The eggs stuck more than the last time, but came out with hot water and a little scraping.
I am now left with this:

To me, it looks like every time I put liquid in the pan I lose most of the seasoning up to the waterline. This is what drove me nuts last time. Am I overreacting? Should I maybe give it a soap and water wash (it looks "dirty" but feels smooth and a wet paper towel comes away pretty clean) and a few more seasoning rounds?

Just keep using it. This guy shows how the seasoning expands every time you cook with it, and he also uses the same cleaning/deglazing method two or three times.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DBBPa01z9v4

Casu Marzu
Oct 20, 2008

SHUT
THE
FUCK
UP!
BIIITCH!




I remember Annies vegan mac and cheese being pretty good

Skyarb
Sep 20, 2018




I tried cooking some long grain brown rice in my zojiroshi but zojiroshi doesn't really have directions for long grain rice. So I followed the direction for medium/short and used the brown rice setting but it came out pretty drat mushy when I want much more seperated grains. Any advice?

effika
Jun 19, 2005
Birds do not want you to know any more than you already do.

Seconding Annie's vegan mac & cheese. Amy's frozen vegan Mac (yes, different name) is also pretty decent and I actually quite enjoy their vegan chili Mac frozen dinner.

If it's just lactose intolerance, is lactase OK for him? Or is it more of an allergy and not just a simple "your body forgot how to process lactose and will mostly be ok of you take the enzyme when you eat it?"

angerbeet
Mar 23, 2004


Come into the lob-ratory! The dog lobster laboratory!


Oral lactase tablets can be hit or miss with lactose intolerance and nobody really wants a kid with a lactose intolerance to have the running jumping screaming poops on a 50/50 chance of lactase naive person to eat Kraft Dinner.

Food intolerances (lactose/fructose etc.) have nothing to do with allergies, they are as the poster above said, a reaction where the gut microbiome cannot process (in this case) normally tolerable sugars, so there is a buildup of fermenting sugars in the gut causing bloating, distress, flatulence, diarrhea, etc.

Allergies (Type I IgE-mediated, anaphylaxis) are an immune response to ingested proteins the body considers to be foreign and would be unlikely though not impossible to suddenly turn up in a person previously able to tolerate that foodstuff.

In my mind, it's not about whether the mac and cheese is subjectively 'good,' it's going to be what looks familiar.

What I would do with the child is explore to find the vegan boxed mac and cheese that looks most like the previous favorite and fancy it up a little with cut lactose-free hot dogs, peas, ketchup , bacon, broccoli, etc. This may allay any notion of change of taste, though of course you want it to taste nice as well. Things like going from "cheezwhiz orange" to "natural cheddar white" and "tubes, basically" to "shells" might be as much of an issue as taste.

You could make a "fun" lockdown experiment out of it, get a couple of vegan brands and let the kid decide. It probably wouldn't be too hard to throw together a home made vegan mac and cheese, there's lots of decent vegan cheeses now and even nutritional yeast in a plant milk base or cashew cream would be nice.

HolyDukeNukem
Sep 10, 2008



Just a few options from my experience:
-Modern table vegan mac is really good and pretty easy to find
-Howls vegan mac is really good, though only found at whole foods and amazon
-Annies is pretty good
-The best for a kid though would be pastabilities vegan mac. It comes in different noodle themes (under the sea and ruffles from what I could find) and tastes good!

Torquemada
Oct 21, 2010

Drei Gläser


Khizan posted:

Does anybody have any recommendations for a lactose-free boxed macaroni and cheese? My seven year old nephew just got diagnosed with lactose intolerance and this is the one thing he's requested that we've been unable to replicate for him.

You dont say how intolerant he is. Some aged hard cheeses contain very low amounts of lactose naturally, notably cheddar and parmesan. Modernist cheese sauce can be made with three ingredients, cheese, water and sodium citrate.

Eeyo
Aug 29, 2004



Torquemada posted:

You dont say how intolerant he is. Some aged hard cheeses contain very low amounts of lactose naturally, notably cheddar and parmesan. Modernist cheese sauce can be made with three ingredients, cheese, water and sodium citrate.

Yeah that will be similar to the boxed mac 'n cheese where you get the packet of cheese sauce and don't mix in milk or butter (what, the "kraft deluxe" I think). So if they like that and they're not super lactose intolerant this will taste similar, but a much better quality.

That's a little distinct from the kraft dinner style, which if you want something as close to that as possible looking for a vegan version is also a good plan.

effika
Jun 19, 2005
Birds do not want you to know any more than you already do.

A lot of people confuse the two so I thought I'd ask

My sister has to carry an epi pen for food allergies and I did immunology work for a while so I get it, bub

Anyway I got the Amy's Vegan frozen Mac the other day and still like it. Gluten free too if anyone needs that.

knowonecanknow
Apr 19, 2009

Ambition must be made to counteract ambition.


What is the secret to cooking skirt steak? I've tried a couple recently and it comes out chewier than I was expecting. So far I've tried marinated and baked, marinated and pan seared on a cast iron, marinated and sous vide at 125 for 1.5 hours then seared as best I could on a cast iron. Currently I only have access to a stove (and a portable induction burner so I can do all smoke generating outside), sous vide, and a cast iron.

Casu Marzu
Oct 20, 2008

SHUT
THE
FUCK
UP!
BIIITCH!




knowonecanknow posted:

What is the secret to cooking skirt steak? I've tried a couple recently and it comes out chewier than I was expecting. So far I've tried marinated and baked, marinated and pan seared on a cast iron, marinated and sous vide at 125 for 1.5 hours then seared as best I could on a cast iron. Currently I only have access to a stove (and a portable induction burner so I can do all smoke generating outside), sous vide, and a cast iron.

Are you cutting across the grain fairly thinly? But overall, skirt steak is not going to be a super tender cut regardless.

knowonecanknow
Apr 19, 2009

Ambition must be made to counteract ambition.


Casu Marzu posted:

Are you cutting across the grain fairly thinly? But overall, skirt steak is not going to be a super tender cut regardless.

I was going across the grain but not very thinly. It tasted good but dang my jaw was tired by the end of the meal. I might have had my expectations wrong for the cut. I can't wait to try again when I get a grill.

Lawnie
Sep 5, 2006

That is my helmet
Give it back
you are a lion
It doesn't even fit


Grimey Drawer

knowonecanknow posted:

I was going across the grain but not very thinly. It tasted good but dang my jaw was tired by the end of the meal. I might have had my expectations wrong for the cut. I can't wait to try again when I get a grill.

Yes, cut very thin (1/4 or less) across the grain and, importantly, on the bias. You want to decrease the length of the muscle fiber to the max when cutting skirt steak.

Scientastic
Mar 1, 2010

TRULY scientastic.


It strikes me that skirt steak is a good candidate for sous vide

knowonecanknow
Apr 19, 2009

Ambition must be made to counteract ambition.


Lawnie posted:

Yes, cut very thin (1/4 or less) across the grain and, importantly, on the bias. You want to decrease the length of the muscle fiber to the max when cutting skirt steak.

I'll try this next time.

Scientastic posted:

It strikes me that skirt steak is a good candidate for sous vide

Isn't everything good in the sous vide?

My wife doesn't think I cooked skirt last night. She thinks I pulled out a sirloin flap. Which after googling I think I would agree. I recently moved out of NYS and the meet selection in my new home is more vast than I used to get. I've been buying everything I haven't seen before.

Submarine Sandpaper
May 27, 2007



I think skirt is one of the perfect overly hot grill steaks. I'm not sure I could get a pan hot enough that I'd love it inside.

Bagheera
Oct 30, 2003


I lost my recipe for chile colorado (aka Texas Red). Can you send me one?

This chili had stewed beef (I used chuck, but this time I'll use cheeks) in a sauce of dried chiles (toasted and rehydrated), garlic, onion, and oregano. After simmering I added masa harina for both thickening and flavor.

No tomatoes or beans. Literally just chiles with carne. Not that there's anything wrong with other chili recipes. I just remember this one was amazing.

But, drat, I lost the recipe, and I can't remember the ratios of ingredients. What kinds of dried chiles, in what proportions? How much onion to add? How much water? Do you have a recipe you can send me, please?

xtal
Jan 9, 2011



How's this? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QvtQI4tq_XU

Lawnie
Sep 5, 2006

That is my helmet
Give it back
you are a lion
It doesn't even fit


Grimey Drawer


This recipe is awesome, my fiance makes it with pork shoulder or beef chuck depending on whats available. Also, love Rick, hes got a beautiful life in Mexico now that hes not working for BA anymore.

Scientastic
Mar 1, 2010

TRULY scientastic.


Chilli... recipe?

Scientastic
Mar 1, 2010

TRULY scientastic.


I want to make some pasta with spicy Italian sausage: if i cant find it in the supermarket, whats a good way to get the same flavours?

xtal
Jan 9, 2011



Lawnie posted:

This recipe is awesome, my fiancée makes it with pork shoulder or beef chuck depending on what’s available. Also, love Rick, he’s got a beautiful life in Mexico now that he’s not working for BA anymore.

Yeah, I actually feel bad linking it but it was my first thought for sure.

Doom Rooster
Sep 3, 2008



Pillbug

Scientastic posted:

I want to make some pasta with spicy Italian sausage: if i cant find it in the supermarket, whats a good way to get the same flavours?

If you can find ground pork, brown it in a little olive oil like you would beef for a meat sauce, then once it's dried up, toss in like a teaspoon each of paprika, red pepper flakes and fennel. Let that toast for like 30 seconds, then add a clove or two of garlic. Toss with pasta and olive oil to taste, or add some tomato paste, fry for a minute or two, then add a can of crushed tomatoes (splash of red wine optional) and cook down to the thickness you want before tossing with pasta.

Even without the pork, the paprika, red pepper, fennel and garlic will be really evocative of the Italian sausage flavor.

Fruits of the sea
Dec 1, 2010


Doom Rooster posted:

If you can find ground pork, brown it in a little olive oil like you would beef for a meat sauce, then once it's dried up, toss in like a teaspoon each of paprika, red pepper flakes and fennel. Let that toast for like 30 seconds, then add a clove or two of garlic. Toss with pasta and olive oil to taste, or add some tomato paste, fry for a minute or two, then add a can of crushed tomatoes (splash of red wine optional) and cook down to the thickness you want before tossing with pasta.

Even without the pork, the paprika, red pepper, fennel and garlic will be really evocative of the Italian sausage flavor.

Yeah, those ingredients really do sum up the flavor. Diced pancetta would round out the dish as well.

SubG
Aug 19, 2004

It's a hard world for little things.


Doom Rooster posted:

Even without the pork, the paprika, red pepper, fennel and garlic will be really evocative of the Italian sausage flavor.
If you're going for generic supermarket Italian sausage then I'd add some MSG as well.

Mr. Wiggles
Dec 1, 2003

We are all drinking from the highball glass of ideology.

SubG posted:

I''d add some MSG as well.

Scientastic
Mar 1, 2010

TRULY scientastic.


Doom Rooster posted:

If you can find ground pork, brown it in a little olive oil like you would beef for a meat sauce, then once it's dried up, toss in like a teaspoon each of paprika, red pepper flakes and fennel. Let that toast for like 30 seconds, then add a clove or two of garlic. Toss with pasta and olive oil to taste, or add some tomato paste, fry for a minute or two, then add a can of crushed tomatoes (splash of red wine optional) and cook down to the thickness you want before tossing with pasta.

Even without the pork, the paprika, red pepper, fennel and garlic will be really evocative of the Italian sausage flavor.

In the end, I found Toulouse sausage, skinned it and added an enormous amount of fennel and some chilli. It worked, definitely fennel is the thing I remember as the flavour of Italian sausage when it was the only meat we could afford in the States

me your dad
Jul 25, 2006



I was watching a video last night of a guy grinding his own beef for a recipe and it got me thinking. I have a Kitchen Aid mixer already. Aside from the initial investment of the grinder attachment, is it a cost-saving quality-adding measure to grind your own beef? I never considered that I could be paying more for the convenience of ground beef, and it seemed like grinding your own would be a bourgeoisie luxury these days. And lastly, is a Kitchen Aid grinder attachment good enough to rely on for grinding beef twice per week?

DekeThornton
Sep 2, 2011

Be friends!


For those of us not in the US that don't get Italian sausage, is it basically salsiccia, or is it something else?

Mister Facetious
Apr 21, 2007


You're Goddamned right I support Medicare for all.







DekeThornton posted:

For those of us not in the US that don't get Italian sausage, is it basically salsiccia, or is it something else?

Check the meat aisle of your local supermarket; what we use in NA as italian sausage is fresh, rather than dried, cured, or pre-cooked.

Since it's usually cooked crumbled with the casing removed, you can make something pretty close with ground pork and the right spices.

Mister Facetious fucked around with this message at 21:03 on Apr 11, 2021

captkirk
Feb 5, 2010


me your dad posted:

I was watching a video last night of a guy grinding his own beef for a recipe and it got me thinking. I have a Kitchen Aid mixer already. Aside from the initial investment of the grinder attachment, is it a cost-saving quality-adding measure to grind your own beef? I never considered that I could be paying more for the convenience of ground beef, and it seemed like grinding your own would be a bourgeoisie luxury these days. And lastly, is a Kitchen Aid grinder attachment good enough to rely on for grinding beef twice per week?

I doubt it would cost saving. They use scraps and trim from portioning out other cuts for part of the ground.

spankmeister
Jun 15, 2008








DekeThornton posted:

For those of us not in the US that don't get Italian sausage, is it basically salsiccia, or is it something else?

It's a pork sausage with fennel

BrianBoitano
Nov 15, 2006

this is fine





captkirk posted:

I doubt it would cost saving. They use scraps and trim from portioning out other cuts for part of the ground.

Yeah, and anything you'd buy to grind at home most supermarkets grind for you, no extra charge. Just ask!

Torquemada
Oct 21, 2010

Drei Gläser


me your dad posted:

I was watching a video last night of a guy grinding his own beef for a recipe and it got me thinking. I have a Kitchen Aid mixer already. Aside from the initial investment of the grinder attachment, is it a cost-saving quality-adding measure to grind your own beef? I never considered that I could be paying more for the convenience of ground beef, and it seemed like grinding your own would be a bourgeoisie luxury these days. And lastly, is a Kitchen Aid grinder attachment good enough to rely on for grinding beef twice per week?

The attachment is fine, dont buy it to save money though. You use it so you know what youre eating as an end product, or if youre in a situation where shops dont sell things ground up that you want ground up.

SHIT POST MALONE
Feb 4, 2005

I was born down. You know this.


captkirk posted:

I doubt it would cost saving. They use scraps and trim from portioning out other cuts for part of the ground.

To that end, it's a gain in quality since you control the cut of steak that goes into it.

The big bummer for me is that by the time I'm able to go grocery shopping the butcher case has been long shut down for grinding/slicing services.

me your dad
Jul 25, 2006



Thanks all. Maybe I'll start by comparing prices in the store and if I see a sale on whole cuts I'll ask the butcher to grind it. I do like the idea of customizing the weight to a better degree. Packaged ground beef for some reason is around 1.3 pounds and sometimes it's less than ideal.

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DekeThornton
Sep 2, 2011

Be friends!


spankmeister posted:

It's a pork sausage with fennel

So, pretty much like fresh salsiccia then. Neat.

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