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poeticoddity
Jan 14, 2007
"How nice - to feel nothing and still get full credit for being alive." - Kurt Vonnegut Jr. - Slaughterhouse Five

Jack B Nimble posted:

Hey, I'm sorry if I've overlooked something obvious, but is there some recommended cook book or website? I ask because I'm frustrated with just about every recipe I find online, not with the recipe itself but with the bloat and advertising of the sites; I'd gladly make a one time purchase to get a list of basic recipes without all that trash.

I think the bloat is fairly minimal on allrecipes.com and their user rating system is usually pretty spot-on.

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Submarine Sandpaper
May 27, 2007



there are add-ons which take you straight to the recipes

Suspect Bucket
Jan 14, 2012

SHRIMPDOR WAS A MAN
I mean, HE WAS A SHRIMP MAN
er, maybe also A DRAGON
or possibly
A MINOR LEAGUE BASEBALL TEAM
BUT HE WAS STILL
SHRIMPDOR


Admiral Joeslop posted:

Favorite cheeses and cheese combinations for grilled cheese? Also what kind of non-tomato soup do you like to go with them?*

*Tomato soup is the best choice obviously.

Smoked Gouda and Munster are grilled cheese bros. You need something a bit tangy to go with the grilled cheese for maximum goodness, maybe a nice minestrone or Italian wedding soup. Why, you doing pairings?

Jack B Nimble
Dec 25, 2007




Soiled Meat

Thanks all, I'll look into the browser extension.

Another question, can anyone recommend a book, video, or essay, or other resources on historical food of the "Wild West"? As in what the settlers, cowboys, etc, actually ate? Preferably with some recipes?

My friends and I are making our way through a pile of Western movies and I'd like to both prepare some traditional meals as well as generally learn more about the food of the period.

totalnewbie
Nov 13, 2005

I was born and raised in China, lived in Japan, and now hold a US passport.

I am wrong in every way, all the damn time.

Ask me about my tattoos.


Bittman how to cook everything is my go to recommendation for a first cook book.

Lawnie
Sep 5, 2006

That is my helmet
Give it back
you are a lion
It doesn't even fit


Grimey Drawer

If youíre an enthusiastic home cook then I think Paprika for your phone should be high on your list. You can paste URLís for recipes into its internal browser and it will format them into recipes by ingredients and instructions, stripped of any ads or other fluff. It has built-in timers, a grocery list, a pantry, and idk what else. I use it basically all the time. Costs a bit but your account can be used on multiple devices, so my girlfriend can add stuff to a grocery list and I can pick it up on the way home.

Casu Marzu
Oct 20, 2008

SHUT
THE
FUCK
UP!
BIIITCH!




Jack B Nimble posted:

Thanks all, I'll look into the browser extension.

Another question, can anyone recommend a book, video, or essay, or other resources on historical food of the "Wild West"? As in what the settlers, cowboys, etc, actually ate? Preferably with some recipes?

My friends and I are making our way through a pile of Western movies and I'd like to both prepare some traditional meals as well as generally learn more about the food of the period.

I dunno about books, etc, but imagine a shitload of beans and salt pork and cornbread/biscuits along with any game they could kill.

nwin
Feb 25, 2002

make's u think


Fallen Rib

I need a decent pad Thai recipe.

Everywhere I look online says something like ďthis is an authentic pad thai recipe, similar to what you would get in ThailandĒ.

I donít want that-I want some Americanized version I would get for take-out. Iíve tried a few recipes and nothing tastes to what Iím looking for.

I have access to an international market, but I didnít see palm sugar the last time I was there-Iíve got some concentrated tamarind paste and good fish sauce, but I also donít have dried shrimp.

The ones Iíve made in the past either taste like nothing, or way too fishy.

BraveUlysses
Aug 7, 2002



Lawnie posted:

If youíre an enthusiastic home cook then I think Paprika for your phone should be high on your list. You can paste URLís for recipes into its internal browser and it will format them into recipes by ingredients and instructions, stripped of any ads or other fluff. It has built-in timers, a grocery list, a pantry, and idk what else. I use it basically all the time. Costs a bit but your account can be used on multiple devices, so my girlfriend can add stuff to a grocery list and I can pick it up on the way home.

+1 paprika is amazing. i hardly ever buy apps and it's well worth the money.

Scientastic
Mar 1, 2010

TRULY scientastic.


Admiral Joeslop posted:

Favorite cheeses and cheese combinations for grilled cheese? Also what kind of non-tomato soup do you like to go with them?*

*Tomato soup is the best choice obviously.

The best combination soup and sandwich is whatever soup and sandwich I have in front of me when asked the question

Flash Gordon Ramsay
Sep 28, 2004



Grimey Drawer

BraveUlysses posted:

+1 paprika is amazing. i hardly ever buy apps and it's well worth the money.

Same. Been using it for years. Recently bought the latest version. Well worth it.

TofuDiva
Aug 22, 2010

Playin' Possum







Muldoon

Admiral Joeslop posted:

Favorite cheeses and cheese combinations for grilled cheese? Also what kind of non-tomato soup do you like to go with them?*

*Tomato soup is the best choice obviously.

Cheddar and Branston's pickle are very nice in grilled cheese. We also like a pepperjack and colby combination.

If your sandwich is pungent enough, french onion soup goes well.

Admiral Joeslop
Jul 8, 2010






Thanks for the ideas, I like hearing what other people make for "regular" meals.

Edit: I've decided to try a Thai Coconut Curry Carrot soup.

Admiral Joeslop fucked around with this message at 19:37 on Jan 7, 2020

toplitzin
Jun 13, 2003


Jack B Nimble posted:

Thanks all, I'll look into the browser extension.

Another question, can anyone recommend a book, video, or essay, or other resources on historical food of the "Wild West"? As in what the settlers, cowboys, etc, actually ate? Preferably with some recipes?

My friends and I are making our way through a pile of Western movies and I'd like to both prepare some traditional meals as well as generally learn more about the food of the period.

SHIT POST MALONE
Feb 4, 2005

I was born down. You know this.


I finally got a matching lid for my 10.25" cast iron skillet so I'm excited to see what I can get out of it as a slow simmering vehicle in the oven.

BraveUlysses
Aug 7, 2002



i made this last night in a cast iron pan and it fuckin owned

https://www.bonappetit.com/recipe/slow-roast-gochujang-chicken

Mr. Wiggles
Dec 1, 2003

We are all drinking from the highball glass of ideology.

Jack B Nimble posted:

Thanks all, I'll look into the browser extension.

Another question, can anyone recommend a book, video, or essay, or other resources on historical food of the "Wild West"? As in what the settlers, cowboys, etc, actually ate? Preferably with some recipes?

My friends and I are making our way through a pile of Western movies and I'd like to both prepare some traditional meals as well as generally learn more about the food of the period.

No particular book, but if you have questions let me know. This was my specialty in University.

SHIT POST MALONE
Feb 4, 2005

I was born down. You know this.


BraveUlysses posted:

i made this last night in a cast iron pan and it fuckin owned

https://www.bonappetit.com/recipe/slow-roast-gochujang-chicken

Oh nice plus this has no dairy so my whole family can eat it.

Pantsmaster Bill
May 7, 2007



BraveUlysses posted:

i made this last night in a cast iron pan and it fuckin owned

https://www.bonappetit.com/recipe/slow-roast-gochujang-chicken

I make this at least once a month, the payoff:effort ratio is so good!

Casu Marzu
Oct 20, 2008

SHUT
THE
FUCK
UP!
BIIITCH!




Similar, I'm a big fan of this guy https://www.vice.com/en_us/article/nexpj7/korean-pan-fried-chicken-recipe

Leave
Feb 7, 2012

Taking the term "Koopaling" to a whole new level since 2016.


I'm looking to try and fry some pork loin, but I'm not sure how to make breading to get good and crispy fried pork. I'm not a super experienced cook, but I like trying different things, and I don't quite have everything I need for tonkatsu, so I figured I'd try to at least try and fry up some pork.

How do you make breading?

Helith
Nov 5, 2009

Basket of Adorables




Leavemywife posted:

I'm looking to try and fry some pork loin, but I'm not sure how to make breading to get good and crispy fried pork. I'm not a super experienced cook, but I like trying different things, and I don't quite have everything I need for tonkatsu, so I figured I'd try to at least try and fry up some pork.

How do you make breading?

Give this recipe a try. Basically you want panko breadcrumbs which come in bags ready to use.


http://adamliaw.com/recipe/how-to-make-tonkatsu/

Leave
Feb 7, 2012

Taking the term "Koopaling" to a whole new level since 2016.


Aww, hell, we don't get paid until Friday. I can't try that until then.

But when I can, I think we're looking at a winner. Thank you!

MAKE NO BABBYS
Jan 28, 2010


Mr. Wiggles posted:

No particular book, but if you have questions let me know. This was my specialty in University.

Very cool. My dad took a seminar on Robber Barons in Grad school and he used to tell me very interesting stories growing up. Also was a Boy Scout in the 50s here in the Bay so a lot of cowboy food.

Zorak of Michigan
Jun 10, 2006

Waiting for his chance

A friend told me she really likes black licorice ice cream. I'm occasionally up for a challenge, so I looked up some recipes, bought some black licorice, and tried melting it in a pot with some water, as they all seem to call for. The stuff I got didn't melt. After a lot longer than recommended, at more heat than recommended, it still looked like the snot of a very ill coal miner. Can anyone recommend some good black licorice for cooking, ideally either available at midwestern grocery stores or online?

Grand Fromage
Jan 30, 2006

L-l-look at you bar-bartender, a-a pa-pathetic creature of meat and bone, un-underestimating my l-l-liver's ability to metab-meTABolize t-toxins. How can you p-poison a perfect, immortal alcohOLIC?




I'd just use anise extract and not try cooking with actual black licorice.

taqueso
Mar 8, 2004









Little bits of licorice candy mixed in might be cool.

bartolimu
Nov 25, 2002




taqueso posted:

Little bits of licorice candy mixed in might be cool.

Licorice is somewhat hygroscopic and might get grainy/odd quickly due to sucking in moisture from the surrounding ice cream, but for serving within a day (maybe even two) that would be interesting to try.

I think Grand Fromage is probably right with the anise flavoring. Actual licorice is likely to contain gelatin, which may mess with the texture of your ice cream base. Using straight flavor lets you adjust to taste without adding unexpected stuff. If you want a grey/black color to mimic adding licorice, just use food coloring.

Skyarb
Sep 20, 2018




I loving suck at sauteeing garlic till golden. I always ALWAYS overcook my garlic and then it tastes awful. Any tips, I just always seem to gently caress it up. If I try to take it off heat as soon as it goldens it still always seems to cook over. Maybe my heat is too high? gently caress I dunno.

captkirk
Feb 5, 2010


Skyarb posted:

I loving suck at sauteeing garlic till golden. I always ALWAYS overcook my garlic and then it tastes awful. Any tips, I just always seem to gently caress it up. If I try to take it off heat as soon as it goldens it still always seems to cook over. Maybe my heat is too high? gently caress I dunno.

Try doing it as the first thing you do in that pan and then pull the garlic to add in later. So if you're going to cook some garlic, brown some meat, and sweat some onion do the garlic first as the pan heats up so you're less likely to underestimate how hot the pan is.

Eeyo
Aug 29, 2004



Skyarb posted:

I loving suck at sauteeing garlic till golden. I always ALWAYS overcook my garlic and then it tastes awful. Any tips, I just always seem to gently caress it up. If I try to take it off heat as soon as it goldens it still always seems to cook over. Maybe my heat is too high? gently caress I dunno.

I guess it depends on what you're cooking. I usually err on the side of less cooking anyway (just embrace the garlic). If it has cooking time after sautť (like a soup, braise, sauce, etc) then how done the garlic is is less important I think. If it's a stir-fry then it's more difficult. You could either cook the garlic with other ingredients, or add other ingredients in when it's close to getting finished. By itself it's prone to browning since it usually ends up in small pieces. But if it's with onions getting fried or on broccoli or something it has less of a chance of burning.

Edit: the garlic prep probably matters too. Crushed with side of knife then rough sliced will be more robust than finely diced; pressed or grated garlic may be even more prone to burning.

Grand Fromage
Jan 30, 2006

L-l-look at you bar-bartender, a-a pa-pathetic creature of meat and bone, un-underestimating my l-l-liver's ability to metab-meTABolize t-toxins. How can you p-poison a perfect, immortal alcohOLIC?




I do the same thing. Undercooking the garlic doesn't seem to matter that much but burning it ruins the whole dish so I don't risk it.

For a stir fry you just don't have much time. Give the garlic 20 seconds or so tops before adding your next ingredient, something that will spit out liquid. That seems to prevent the garlic from burning.

Scientastic
Mar 1, 2010

TRULY scientastic.


I made this potted shrimp at Christmas, but unfortunately it really didnít work very well: the butter was grainy, and there was a layer of liquid at the bottom of each ramekin. Any idea why that happened?

Fortunately, I had backup starters...

TychoCelchuuu
Jan 2, 2012

This space for Rent.

Skyarb posted:

I loving suck at sauteeing garlic till golden. I always ALWAYS overcook my garlic and then it tastes awful. Any tips, I just always seem to gently caress it up. If I try to take it off heat as soon as it goldens it still always seems to cook over. Maybe my heat is too high? gently caress I dunno.
Cook it for less time.

Flash Gordon Ramsay
Sep 28, 2004



Grimey Drawer

Or cook your garlic over lower heat. If you canít control how quickly it goes from browned to burnt, your heat is too high.

Jack B Nimble
Dec 25, 2007




Soiled Meat

Mr. Wiggles posted:

No particular book, but if you have questions let me know. This was my specialty in University.

That's awesome!

Ok, was there some common "camp" or "trail" method of using corn meal or flour? I'm thinking maybe they didn't rise dough to make bread but what do I know. I also imagine you get fancier food out of a chuck wagon compared to whatever someone would just tuck in a saddle bag. Actually, yeah, what were the common "trail rations" for trips out in the wilderness.

Mr. Wiggles
Dec 1, 2003

We are all drinking from the highball glass of ideology.

Jack B Nimble posted:

That's awesome!

Ok, was there some common "camp" or "trail" method of using corn meal or flour? I'm thinking maybe they didn't rise dough to make bread but what do I know. I also imagine you get fancier food out of a chuck wagon compared to whatever someone would just tuck in a saddle bag. Actually, yeah, what were the common "trail rations" for trips out in the wilderness.

There were definitely a few different "standard" preparations of basic grains. The question was always "to rise or not to rise". If rising wasn't an option, then it was common to have simply a cornmeal mush (think polenta), cooked with water in a kettle or pot. Simple ash cakes or tortillas might be made as well, forming patties out of the flour or cornmeal and cooking near the fire. If one had the time or ability to have the bread rise, though, sourdough was the method most likely to be used. Folks would keep a culture going on the trail or at home, adding flour and water and taking out to leaven dough as needed. The resulting breads, usually in the form of biscuits or sheepherder bread, were cooked in a dutch oven. Again, the cakes or tortillas could be cooked from sourdough. Absent yeast of some kind, pearlash might be used to leaven the dough, but this tended to be limited to the home. In the later 1800s, though, commercially produced baking powder became widely available and all of a sudden people all across the West could make reliable quick breads and biscuits with just a few dry ingredients and water, which caused a minor revolution in cookery both on the trail and at home. For those who couldn't pack a dutch oven and the other necessities for cooking on the trail, though, there were lots of options for hardtack, trail crackers, and just hard breads made locally that could be kept good for weeks at a time.

Chuck wagons are a little outsized in their myth for how common they were - they weren't common at all. You wouldn't see one "on the trail" as they couldn't keep up reliably with the cattle and those driving them. Large trail drives may have had a dedicated cook, but he was going to be hauling his supplies on mules and cooking over the campfire. Where you did see chuck wagons was at larger, more permanent locations like mining and logging camps or a "doings". In this case, yes, you would see more intricate foods (maybe biscuits and gravy, or roasted meats, soups, etc.). Think of the chuck wagon as the "food truck" of the day - they showed up in the same sort of places.

Trail rations would depend on your ability to carry stuff and how fast you wanted to move. Generally, though, you would see a basic grain like cornmeal or flour, dried beans (which could be soaked all day and then boiled at night), dried beef, salt pork (there was ALWAYS salt pork if you could carry it), pemmican perhaps, and ground coffee. This wasn't a varied diet. Vegetables were limited to what you could find growing. It is important to note, however, that various ethnic groups would bring foods on the trail that others might not. Germans in a wagon headed west very well might have a keg of sauerkraut, and the Basques would tend to have found a way to bring garlic with them as well as salted cod if they could afford it. But yeah, those scenes in Westerns where someone goes to the general store and orders coffee, beans, and flour? Not too far off the mark.

Now, home cooking could be extremely intricate and that's a whole different discussion. And the boomtowns could be absolutely posh - when the Goldfield Hotel opened in Goldfield Nevada in 1900, they made a waterfall of champagne flow down the front steps and the whole town was treated to fresh oysters, caviar, and other "assorted dainties".

totalnewbie
Nov 13, 2005

I was born and raised in China, lived in Japan, and now hold a US passport.

I am wrong in every way, all the damn time.

Ask me about my tattoos.


Garlic:
I usually add it to oil before it's even really hot so that the garlic barely bubbles/sizzles when it's added. When it gets going, I turn the heat down so it doesn't burn.

BrianBoitano
Nov 15, 2006

this is fine





Grand Fromage posted:

For a stir fry you just don't have much time. Give the garlic 20 seconds or so tops before adding your next ingredient, something that will spit out liquid. That seems to prevent the garlic from burning.

To me itís this 95% of the time. Garlic should not be alone in the pan for more than a minute except in certain preparations.

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Oxyclean
Sep 23, 2007




Not sure if there's a better thread for this, but anyone have rice cooker recommendations? Or at least brands/things to look for? The coating on the bowl part of mine is wearing away and it's probably time to replace. Don't need anything too big (usually just cooking for myself, but being able to make enough for leftovers is nice) steamer basket is a big plus.

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