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MantisClaw
Jun 3, 2011


Jehde posted:

WWSD seems to be about making a gamer rifle first and foremost.

I agree. Nothing wrong with a light weight build but for a dedicated hard use training/serious business gun I'd rather have some extra durability. Reinforced upper/lower receivers and heavy barrels come in handy every once and a while.

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MantisClaw
Jun 3, 2011


22 Eargesplitten posted:


What do you mean by reinforced upper/lower? Do you mean billet ones with more meat on them than the standard forged milspec receivers? IIRC part of the inspiration for using the polymer lower was when someone at a competition accidentally ran over a bunch of rifles with their truck. All of the aluminum lowers snapped, but the polymer lower was still functional.

I'm personally referring to things like the Bootleg enhanced upper receiver and the like. Mine took an OOB detonation that would have wrecked a milspec upper according to my resident AR fixer. If you do dumb things with your guns, which I'll admit not everyone does, that increased structural support can be handy for not that much more weight.

Granted the guys I shoot with are known for breaking poo poo. It's to the point that I got accused of having mutant super powers during my last training event.

Like I said before nothing wrong their approach and their reasoning is sound, but the WWSD is very clearly built around their experiences with 2gACM. If a similar situation applies to you then a WWSD would be an excellent option.

:edit:FB

Miso Beno posted:

It's a fun thought exercise and an interesting build, but some folks treat it like it's the penultimate general purpose AR, which is something I disagree strongly with.

MantisClaw fucked around with this message at 17:38 on Jan 9, 2020

MantisClaw
Jun 3, 2011


dema posted:

I'm pretty terrible at shooting offhand. Given paper with an actual target, what kind of groups are decent for 25 yards? I've got a bunch of ammo and an indoor range 5 minutes away, what should I be working towards? Again, talking offhand here, sub 1" is no problem at the moment with practice ammo and a rest.

What are you trying to accomplish? Are you shooting for competition, practical use, or just for fun? Do you have a time standard? Best advice I could give is just to track data. Score targets, measure groups and log the results. Fundamentals like trigger press, natural point of aim, and follow through still apply to unsupported positions and always seek formal training when possible over advice from internet weirdos.

MantisClaw
Jun 3, 2011


PookBear posted:

did any of the new calibers catch on other than 300blk?

Not really, unless we're including AR10s in which case 6.5 creedmore has caught on in the long range crowd.

MantisClaw
Jun 3, 2011


devmd01 posted:

However, there is a little bit of the spirit of the highway of death in this one:



Are we posting lovely gun cosplay? Cause I got lovely gun cosplay.



Vietnam era Colt M16A1 parts kit + Armalite lower.
Pencil Colt 6920 factory cut with A2 sights

MantisClaw fucked around with this message at 06:59 on Mar 27, 2020

MantisClaw
Jun 3, 2011


BCM, SOLGW, FN, Colt 6920, Sionics, Daniel Defense are all decent mid level guns.
TFR is a big fan of Aero but the last batch of parts that came into my local AR expert had some QC issues. What is this role of this gun?

MantisClaw
Jun 3, 2011


californiasushi posted:

i don't think i've ever seen accuracy reviews on the solgw or sionics barrel despite being very popular with the tactical crowd

I think that's due to the current industry trend to use overall reliability and longevity as a metric for performance (See KAC getting mentioned on P&S for 20k lifespan before any parts change). I remember solgw stating before that they don't offer precision guns since they couldn't make them to the same reliability standard.

MantisClaw
Jun 3, 2011


uwaeve posted:

On a bad breath carbine I have also seen people running X300-U lights, they clear the sight plane, are ambidextrous, and have a broader beam that doesn't throw as far (they're meant as a pistol light). It's a nice lightweight option that saves you from dicking with wires and tape switches and mounts. Unity tactical sells a sneeze guard for the X300 switches, and there are iron sights that tuck into the space between the switches as well (the DD fixed one I think is the one I run).

If you understand what you're giving up (candela, throw, sight radius) and it fits your application, it's another option.

Source: I own OWLs and X300s. Love them both, the OWL is baller but heavy and even though it's nice to be able to light people on fire with it, a pistol light is serviceable if you are not trying to punch out real far.

If I remember right, the 600 lumen X300U and Scoutlights share the same beam pattern so the only difference is the the control layout (X300s can snap the switch retaining tab if carbine mounted and not up against something like the front sight post.) Also I've heard that they have better candela then the newer 1000 lumen surefires but I've never seen them side-by-side myself to compare.

I ran an X300U on my trainining/HD carbine for several years and only recently switched to a PHL modlite. If you don't need to push distance, nothing wrong with a pistol light with more spill.

MantisClaw
Jun 3, 2011


Streamlights are perfectly acceptable, in many cases they have better candela then Surefires, I'm just not a fan of their switches. I've also noticed some battery drain from my Streamlight ProTac after months of zero use. Not sure if that's a light issue or caused by light ND's when in a bag (again I don't like their switches).

When it comes down to light selection, remember that most of the newer high end lights are about pushing light out to 200 yards or so and defeating photonic barriers where candela matters. Bill Blowers (NW SWAT dude) deliberately picks high spill, lower candela lights because he likes being able to light up an entire room while keeping the gun in a safe orientation. If you plan to use that gun at what is traditionally pistol distances, then you can get by with a weaker or pistol oriented lights. I personally prefer high lumen, more spill lights as it fits my situation better and putting 1000+ lumens into someones face is a very useful tool.

Just be sure to test your light in the environment you plan to use it in and in different lighting conditions to see if it meets your expectations.

MantisClaw fucked around with this message at 01:08 on Apr 2, 2020

MantisClaw
Jun 3, 2011


Note that those are known for not being the most durable, but it is what it is.
I have a Brownells 42 and while I love it on my retro gun, it does not lend itself to modern dynamic shooting, especially on a fixed stock platform.

How do you plan to use your AR? Are you looking for a defensive, range, or target setup?

MantisClaw
Jun 3, 2011


You're probably best off with the gooseneck then. Otherwise you're sacrificing check weld (and thus stability) for a more heads up position which isn't really a concern for what you plan to do. If you wanted to use magnification, the brownells scope good enough for range use. It does require a 'nose to charging handle' position though.

MantisClaw
Jun 3, 2011


Red dots excel in terms of pure speed of acquisition and in unconventional positions due to the lack of an eyebox. It's much easier to see the dot if you can't get perfectly behind the rifle. They also work better with NVGs but that's probably not a concern for you.

Current LPVOs that optimize performance at 1x allow for almost equivalent close range performance to a dot while providing the option for increased magnification for finding target ID at distance at the cost of $$$ and weight.

It you want to see an example of where a RDS reigns supreme, take a look at InRangeTV's match content. Fellow goon SinistralRifleman, who also makes an appearance on the channel, has stated that this is due to the increased amount of target presentations combined with the relatively shorter distances and larger target sizes compared to a more traditional 3gun match.

Magnifiers can help see at distance but typically will have poor field of view and eyebox compared to equivalent magnification LPVOs. They will magnify EVERYTHING including the dot itself (don't listen to Eotech's marketing) which can make precise aiming more difficult and optimal eye relief for a magnifier may preclude the mounting of backup irons. Their biggest advantage is that they are removable which allows you to run a lighter set up 90% of the time and you can throw it on if you know in advance that you'll be doing distance stuff. Otherwise the price and weight of RDS+Magnifier compared to an LPVO are very similar.

Backup sights have their place but a lot depends on your use case. I like flip up irons on RDS guns but that's cause I have a habit of burning through batteries. I currently have them on my LPVO setup, but that's more because I'm too lazy to take them off and they don't really hurt anything. Offset red dots are easier to use then offset irons and very close in cost in $$$ and weight but some people like the no battery option. If your gun will be used primarily at longer range with some targets up close then they might be an option for you.

MantisClaw
Jun 3, 2011


Nitrousoxide posted:

Assuming the scope's reticle isn't all from an illuminated reticle and it had actual etched lines on it, you really don't need a batteyless backup like irons right? It'll still be usable in 1x mode with no batteries effectively?

I do want something on there in case I leave the rifle in the safe for a few months and come back to a dead LPVO or red dot that there's a backup.

That is correct. An illuminated reticle just makes it easier to to run at speed or in low light.

MantisClaw
Jun 3, 2011


Android Apocalypse posted:

I find this method works the best for me:
1. Keeping rifle pointed forward, press mag release and let mag drop free of rifle. If you're left-handed and don't have ambi controls, you reach up to press mag release & strip mag.
2. Simultaneously lift muzzle up and pull stock down, pinning the stock between your arm & your body.
3. Draw new magazine & firmly insert into magwell, pulling down to ensure it has seated correctly. This can be done simultaneously with step 2.
4. Press bolt release while shouldering rifle to get sight picture.

I remember back in the 2007-2008 Magpul days of trying to flip the mag or just going immediately into putting the rifle into the 45 degree angle before pressing the mag release. This would cause the mag to get caught up in the magwell and not drop free. Keeping the rifle level while pressing the mag release first allows gravity to do its job.

Of course there's exceptions to these steps (loading/firing from unconventional positions) but these steps seem to work well for me.

This is a good breakdown and pretty much what I was taught as well with the addition of running the safety during the reload. I find stock in shoulder does involve less overall movement and allows you to keep the gun 'pointed at the threat,' if that's your jam, but I've noticed that the gun will want to start to move away from the reload during the mag insertion and I've seen that cause issues. Especially if you're trying to seat a full mag with a closed bolt.

MantisClaw
Jun 3, 2011


AR are pretty easy to run as a lefty. The biggest issue is having to depress the mag release with the support hand rather then using the dominant index finger but that's not a big deal.

I lock the bolt back using the following method:
  • Bring support hand back near the mag well
  • Break firing grip to grasp the wings of the charging handle
  • Pull charging handle all the way to the rear
  • While keeping the charging handle back press and hold the bottom of the bolt catch (the seesaw looking lever on the left side of the gun)
  • Release the charging handle, the handle should stay in where it is if you did it properly. Push the charging handle back into the closed position.


As far as reloads go, you have a couple options after inserting the mag:
  • If your fingers are long enough, you can press the top of the bolt catch with your dominant index finger.
  • Otherwise you can bring your hand around the front of the magwell to hit the bolt catch. I find that this method has a higher rate of success but is not as efficient as the above technique
Try to use the bolt catch whenever possible. It's really easy to mess up a reload with the charging handle under stress.


Safety Manipulation. You should be getting in the habit of putting the rifle on safe whenever it's not pointed at the target or it's physically impossible (hammer is down)
  • One method is to rest the trigger finger on top of the selector. Roll the selector down with your index finger while simultaneously establishing your grip to place it on fire. To put the selector back on safe, slide your hand back so that it rotates the selector back to the safe position.
  • The other is to manipulate the selector by using the dominant thumb to rotate it down. It is then placed on safe using the same method as state above. This has the downside of negatively effecting your shooting grip.


As far as storage goes I prefer empty magwell, close bolt. If the gun is being staged for defensive purposes then I fully load the gun with a round in the chamber, safety on. It's also in a place where there is minimal risk of the rifle falling down.

MantisClaw fucked around with this message at 14:03 on Jun 16, 2020

MantisClaw
Jun 3, 2011


Nitrousoxide posted:

Whew, I'm seeing ambi bolt catches that require dremeling into the lower to make a channel to the other side. I assume the non-destructive bolt catches like Android Apocalypse mentioned will do the job well? I'm pretty averse to cutting into my brand new lower to make that control ambi.

The bolt catch looks like the only part that doesn't a channel to the other side

If you understandably don't want to mod your receiver, extended bolt catches such as the aforementioned Geissele part will help. There are also things like the Magpul BAD lever that attach to the existing bolt catch, but I'm not a fan of putting controls right next to the trigger and they can interfere with the normal cycle of operation.

In my opinion, Ambi or lefty safety > Ambi charging handle > Ambi mag release >>>> Ambi bolt release. Individual proficiency ultimately will matter way more then gear ever will.

MantisClaw
Jun 3, 2011


Fifty Three posted:

Sure thing! The longer the sight radius, the more accurate you can be. It also leaves a bit more space for the inevitable optic and moves the rear sight closer to your eye with a normal cheekweld. Curiously, all the pictures I see of the Saint elsewhere also have the rear sight in that position. Anyone else have one and can weight in on why that would be?

Most likely it's to avoid any potential interference with the charging handle which is a possibility if your BIUS are particularly bulky. I run mine a couple slots forward for just that reason. You'll also see dudes like Kyle Defoor and the people who run Progressive Force Concepts advocating for ~14" between sights to balance speed of acquisition and precision but I highly doubt that's the case here.

MantisClaw
Jun 3, 2011


You should be fine as long as the clamp in on the receiver. It's not ideal but no terrible.

Priority should be your primary sighting system (dot + mag) so if you need to ditch the BUIS to make the best use of them, so be it.

MantisClaw
Jun 3, 2011


If I remember correctly, yes.

1/8 is a good do-it-all twist rate that will let you stabilized 55gr - 77gr. Where it starts to fail is when you start talking about the heavier projectiles designed to push 5.56 as far as it will go.

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MantisClaw
Jun 3, 2011


Thunder Moose posted:

https://www.thefirearmblog.com/blog/2019/08/22/the-uic-adm4-mod2-from-adm/

Local store is selling a mod2 for around $2000 - this a good deal and a solid rifle or no?

My experience is in shotguns, .22's, and handguns - not semiautomatic rifles.

I've run an ADM lower for a good 2.5 years and have been really happy with the ambi controls. Can't speak to the rest of the rifle though.

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