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Mortabis
Jul 8, 2010


Lawman 0 posted:

First time poster in this thread.
So what was the dumbest aircraft of the cold war?

There are a lot of good contenders here. Among ones that actually entered service I submit the F7U Cutlass and the Sea Vixen.

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Mortabis
Jul 8, 2010


MikeCrotch posted:

One thing with nuclear power is that if you are an environmentalist who believes in decarbonising as much as possible by 2025-2030 nuclear power plants just take so long to build they don't really help, so you would be better off with renewables and reducing demand (or so the argument goes).

There's no good reason for your timeframe to be that short. If we needed to decarbonize by then we'd be screwed anyway since it takes so long for CO2 to come out of the atmosphere. Anyway there's absolutely no way anyone is going to decarbonize in five years, that's absurd, whether or not nuclear power is involved.

Mortabis fucked around with this message at 01:11 on Jan 13, 2020

Mortabis
Jul 8, 2010


ulmont posted:

I was speaking for Germans there (note the impersonal nature of the question).

Personally, no, but I think there's less possible damage from a coal ash dump than a nuclear power plant. The trends seem to be in favor of solar + wind + other renewables as a medium to long term strategy, and strongly against any new construction of nuclear, so while I wouldn't bother shutting down any existing nuclear power plants I don't think building any new ones is a good idea.

Solar and wind are not practical sources of baseload power. Nuclear power is. Nuclear accidents are extremely uncommon and have caused very few casualties.

Mortabis
Jul 8, 2010


Solar power is not going to be cheaper than nuclear power in Germany and the amount of time required to build a plant is not a factor.

Mortabis
Jul 8, 2010


TheFluff, check in please

Mortabis
Jul 8, 2010


The Army started up some kind of "pilot" direct commission program for Force Management officers last year, putting job ads at a few top business schools. One of the officers running it is in my program; he told me they got about 10 applicants. They're trying to commission MBAs as captains and majors. I gather this is part of trying to solve a shortage in mid-level officers.

Mortabis
Jul 8, 2010


It seems like a reasonable idea to me. What I gather is that force management is a job that doesn't appeal to the kind of person who signs up to be an Army officer. You will be filling out lots of spreadsheets, writing reports, crunching numbers, etc. But if you're a civilian MBA, who's looking at consulting, finance, marketing, etc. the prospect of being an excel monkey in uniform and basically never deploying might be appealing.

Mortabis
Jul 8, 2010


So, should the force management branch not exist? I don't really know much about what it does.

Mortabis
Jul 8, 2010


Just the fact that it's not named for a politician alone is a blessing.

Frankly I think the rule should be no naming ships after people at all. While this gentleman deserves it, many people who don't will inevitably get on the list.

Mortabis
Jul 8, 2010


FuturePastNow posted:

Carrier names should be limited to battles, dead admirals and generals, and words like enterprise. Ships should never be named after politicians unless that person is also a dead admiral or general.

Disagree, they should be states.

Mortabis
Jul 8, 2010


Mazz posted:

Subs get states/cities for the most part

State names should be reserved for the most important vessels like they were with battleships.

Mortabis
Jul 8, 2010


That's only 90 minutes from Grand Forks. Maybe next time I'm there I'll go and take some pictures.

Mortabis
Jul 8, 2010


Cooling a reactor with molten lead isn't a stupid idea, and has some significant safety advantages over ordinary pressurized water reactors.

Mortabis
Jul 8, 2010


The article explains that inconel and titanium visually look similar so presumably they were delivering parts to the wrong area of the production line.

Mortabis
Jul 8, 2010


Can't help but feel that despite the effort involved, the spy game in the Cold War didn't matter. The important piece of intelligence was the realization that Soviet economic figures were bogus, standard of living was regressing, and consequently if we walked away from detente they could never keep up. No theft of secrets could make up the difference.

Mortabis
Jul 8, 2010


kill me now posted:

If we marched on Hanoi that would have provoked a major response from the USSR and or China similar to when we marched up to the Yalu river in Korea.

IIRC that's what we believed at the time and later it turned out, in hindsight, neither really cared enough.

Mortabis
Jul 8, 2010


Shooting Blanks posted:

Small cheap boats don't have a reliable range of 200+ miles, certainly not at any kind of intercept speed and with any reliability. Swarm style tactics are potentially viable when you're talking about shore defense - it doesn't work as well when you're a blue water navy fighting another blue water navy, and right now your positioning is "we're in the middle of this featureless area with an enemy 200+ miles away also with no features"

Forget 200 miles, if you find a small boat that can reliably get out of the marina under its own power without me spending every other weekend working on it let me know.

Mortabis
Jul 8, 2010


Visual light is the part of the spectrum that penetrates water most efficiently, which is why it is the part of the spectrum that is visible.

Mortabis
Jul 8, 2010


Gotta figure the Russians know that we know all their poo poo after they've been in Ukraine and Syria this long.

Mortabis
Jul 8, 2010


A.o.D. posted:

Subs are really difficult to attack if you don't have air and/or sea control. To the best of my knowledge, a massed hypersonic missile bombardment probably isn't an effective counter to them.

This is the first thing I thought of. Reminds me of the idea floated during planning for the invasion of the Japanese Home Islands of using submarines as radar pickets against kamikazes at night. I don't know if it's a good idea, but it's an idea.

Mortabis
Jul 8, 2010


Lasers on subs makes me wonder if it would be a good idea to bring back nuclear cruisers just for more laser power.

edit: typo

Mortabis fucked around with this message at 20:57 on Feb 10, 2020

Mortabis
Jul 8, 2010


The ammo doesn't actually cost anywhere close to as much as a tomahawk, that's just the government's maliciously bad accounting at work.

Mortabis
Jul 8, 2010


Godholio posted:

I'd be curious to see some economy of scale numbers. The F-22 and B-2 are pretty glaring examples of how the cost of something that's supposed to be bought in high numbers ends up as a boutique purchase. I can only imagine when you're expecting orders in the thousands/hundreds of thousands/millions over time and it gets cut to basically Initial Testing + 50 or whatever.

The trouble here is sunk costs. Even if you don't get the economies of scale, if you've already sunk a bunch of money to develop the projectiles and the guns, the cost per round is whatever the marginal cost is, not that plus the amortized money you've already spent.

Mortabis
Jul 8, 2010


I know I bang on about this a lot but just imagine how many more ships everyone would have if everyone just got their naval vessels from say South Korea, which can actually build ships economically.

Mortabis
Jul 8, 2010


I don't think the story of the F-16 is one of failure. We got the development money back on that in value.

Mortabis
Jul 8, 2010


It's totally fair to be skeptical of this administration's claims that Chinese exporters are up to something wily, but the Huawei concerns do seem to genuinely come from the US intelligence community rather than trade warriors.

Mortabis
Jul 8, 2010


Also an old quote from him is: "Democracy is a like a streetcar. You ride it to your destination, and then you get off." That was when he was mayor of Istanbul like 20 years ago, and guess what, he got off the streetcar.

Mortabis
Jul 8, 2010


I feel obliged to point out that the USSR was responsible (via material assistance) for considerably more terrorism than Al Qaeda.

Mortabis
Jul 8, 2010


KYOON GRIFFEY JR posted:

Isn't there an Osprey driver on this forum? I forget who.

Bob A Feet

Mortabis
Jul 8, 2010


The worst things Mao did were borne out of his ideology. The famine was caused by farm collectivization, if you're just trying to centralize power into a dictatorial regime you don't need to do that.

Mortabis
Jul 8, 2010



In what I'm sure is a grotesque understatement, this does not sound economically viable.

Mortabis
Jul 8, 2010


large hands posted:

Wasn't sure if it was Canadian or American as that's pretty much the nautical border between Vancouver Island and the San Juan islands.

Looks like a Canadian Halifax class frigate.

Mortabis
Jul 8, 2010


Bitcoin has a lot of inherent problems from the fact that the guy who invented it was a genius cryptographer, but a moron when it comes to monetary economics. Which is true of cryptocurrency enthusiasts generally as they are mostly former (or current) goldbugs.

Since bitcoin is mostly used for money laundering, contraband, and evading capital controls, and is designed to be inherently deflationary, its volatility with respect to the real economy as a whole is very very bad. But it remains more or less the best available option if you're in Venezuela or China or some other country with bullshit monetary restrictions and you're trying to move your assets out of the country.

The basic idea behind cryptocurrency is creating a decentralized payment scheme that doesn't rely on the government or the banking system, but it turns out that most of the time the stuff the government and banking system do for you in terms of not having all your poo poo stolen and maintaining stable price levels is pretty handy.

Mortabis
Jul 8, 2010


When units drop vehicles for training do they reuse the same ones so as not to slowly bust up the entire fleet of them?

I'm hoping the answer is yes because I'm giggling a bit at how un-driveable a truck must be after dropping it a few dozen times

Mortabis
Jul 8, 2010


We discussed before, it sure seems like he knows it's about to happen so probably he was in on it somehow.

Mortabis
Jul 8, 2010


mlmp08 posted:

-Road mobile missile hedgehogs work quite well with sea-mobile F-35B carriers. The real argument against this is "how often will this happen versus how much does it cost?" That's the more reasonable counter-argument Mortabis and others have made.

The argument of "how much does it cost" is also now moot after we have already spent all that money developing it. Now that we have it, it's the only thing that can do what it does and we might as well take advantage of it.

I recognize this is unsatisfying from a, let's say public choice theory standpoint Dead Reckoning seems to be coming from, where the Marines manage to finagle their toy into the budget and suffer no institutional consequences or something, but cosmic justice isn't the objective here.

Mortabis fucked around with this message at 04:14 on May 26, 2020

Mortabis
Jul 8, 2010


Dead Reckoning posted:

Please explain to me the scenario where we have a runway too short to operate conventional fighter-bombers (which is significantly less than 10,000') but one juuuust long enough to make the F-36B useful, plus all the other appropriate infrastructure to support high tempo air ops, while fighting an adversary who requires next-gen stealth aircraft to defeat.

Defending Taiwan; F-35s operate from pre-prepared reinforced highway strips along the east coast of the island.

Mortabis
Jul 8, 2010


If the political leadership decides bombing the dirt isn't useless, then it's the job of military planners to figure out how to do that most effectively and economically. To a certain extent you can't just abstract up to "should we be doing this in the first place" if it's foreordained that we will be doing it.

Arglebargle III posted:

You really think defending Taiwan is still a realistic part of our strategic posture?

This is not a snark post, genuine question

Without getting too political, I don't know exactly what our response would be if China invaded Taiwan tomorrow. I do know what we would like the Chinese to think our response would be. I hope that our response would be to defend Taiwan, and ostensibly, that's our posture.

Amphibious assaults are challenging enough that I think we could realistically prevent a Chinese invasion right now with enough warning.

Mortabis fucked around with this message at 16:17 on May 26, 2020

Mortabis
Jul 8, 2010


Oberndorf posted:

I donít know if the Marines plan to or not, but I know the Taiwanese do.

Yeah I mean is it consensus that Taiwan just shouldn't have an air force?

Look I'm just some guy on the internet but my intuition is Taiwan is a big island, and you can stick fuel and parts and things on trucks, and the main reason that stuff is relatively easy to blow up with missiles normally is it's sitting in big tanks on an airfield that you know the location of from google maps.

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Mortabis
Jul 8, 2010


Dead Reckoning posted:

The proposition that it was a good idea for America to design VTOL into the strike fighter that will be the lion's share of our tac air fleet needs to be explained beyond, "well Taiwan might use it because they literally have no other choice."

Does it? I mean, it happened, we did it, the F-35B exists, so now what? The question of whether we should have done it is at best academic.

edit: also how does the logistical footprint compare between air-to-air missions vs. strike missions? The harrier FOB in the falklands was far more effective for the former because sidewinders weight a lot less than bombs.

Mortabis fucked around with this message at 22:57 on May 26, 2020

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