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The Eyes Have It
Feb 9, 2008

Third Eye Sees All
...snookums

This thread is for gun and shooting related DIY projects of any kind, including
  • Stuff you have made
  • Stuff you'd like to make
  • Sharing things other people made that you think is cool
  • Questions about making stuff
  • Answers about making stuff

Since 3D printing is so hot right now, I'm going to say some stuff about it. Here's a quick link to SA's 3D printing megathread. The OP is out of date but many of the people in the thread are more or less been-there-done-that.

3D Printing Guns
If your eyes zoomed in on this part, you're not going to see 3D printed guns here. It can be perfectly legal to make your own guns (depending on location) but the reason you won't see any is because the worky bits of even a lovely 3D printed gun are still the same worky bits that actual guns use. Sure, there are some proofs of concept pushing the envelope that boil down to being unsafe zip guns, akin to something someone would cobble together from hardware store parts. That being said, there are some pretty interesting (and variously unsafe) things being done by people with e.g. 3D printing lower receivers or frames or things like that. But in short: the sky isn't falling.

3D Printing
  • Once the domain of borderline autistic monomaniacs with a craving for self-punishment, 3D printers are now miles beyond where they were even a few short years ago.
  • BUT they are still not yet at the point of being foolproof appliances like toasters. It'll be a learning experience / hobby like any other that needs time.
  • If you can afford it, buy a Prusa printer. They are worth the money. and imo they are even almost as good as people say they are!
  • If you just want to gently caress around as cheaply as possible, there are other "best bang for your buck" options, nearly all of which are from China.
  • Just FYI expect that 3D printing a 3d model that wasn't designed with 3D printing in mind is going to be a huge pain in the rear end. Like looking at a LEGO model and going "cool well I'm going to make it out of modeling clay instead, how hard can it be?"

How the gently caress Does 3D Printing Work? Explain it to me in terms of how it would actually happen, please
This is a really good question and resources online pretty much completely ignore people's need to know this. Here's the whole thing end-to-end so you can have some context.

Let's say you want to 3D print this rockin' hot new sculpture called "20 mm test cube". You're going to turn this:
>>>> into >>>>

Here's the basic workflow:

1. Get a 3D model of what you want to print. An STL file, in other words. Two basic ways to do this:
2. Just FYI: assuming Windows, double-click the STL file and open it in Microsoft 3D builder. In that program you can look to make sure it looks right in a basic sense and can also do simple modifications and operations (but you can't do serious CAD functions on it.) Anyway just FYI you can open and look and gently caress with it a bit without firing up "3D printer software".

3. Fire up your 3D printer's software. Example: PrusaSlicer (Prusa's software for their printers). Drag and drop that STL file in and you'll see something like this (click it for big):

That's the cube dropped there in the middle of that plate. The plate represents the actual, physical build plate of the actual machine. This program is where you do things like:
  • Move the model around on the plate, like for if you're printing many objects and laying out where you want them to be, or putting it on its side or whatever.
  • Simple stuff like scaling it up or down to change the size.
  • In the upper right is poo poo like telling it how much infill (how hollow or solid the part is), what layer resolution, and so on. In general the nicer / solider the slower it is to make.
  • The tabs to the upper left go to nitty gritty details about how the machine operates (in depth poo poo, like how fast to do certain operations and junk.)

4. Once the basics like model placement and layer resolution & infill are set, then you do one thing before actual printing: you slice the object. Here's what the gently caress that means:
  • The 3D object is processed by the slicer, which means the program literally computes exactly how the printer will move and where it will poop out molten plastic and for how long.
  • Once the model is sliced, you can view a preview to make sure it looks sane.
Here's a simulation of how the object should get built, layer by layer, from the bottom up.

You basically just look at this and make sure it looks sane. It's good practice, and sometimes the slicer can freak out on or misinterpret small details or edge cases, and you fix them by going into the slicer settings, making a tweak, and then re-slicing and checking to see if it's fixed.

5. Then you get the sliced job (a file format called GCODE) which is in the secret language of the machines. It is a literal step-by-step in machine terms (e.g. move this motor this much, now turn on this heater that much, now move this motor that much, etc etc).

How exactly the GCODE file gets to the printer can be different per printer. Two of my printers allows upload over Wi-Fi. One requires sneakernet on an SD card. But it's still just putting e.g. "20mm_test_cube.gcode" onto the printer in the end.

6. Once the job is uploaded to the printer, you can generally use the printer's controls to:
  • Yawn hi I am a printer, ok I'm awake hello how are you
  • "Hello Printer I am fine please print this job"
  • OK that's sure a print job alright, stand by
At which point the printer needs care and feeding like heating up, making sure it's loaded with filament, and all that other junk.

7. The printer will then make motor noises for the next X hours (or whatever, the test cube mentioned would be <1 hour for sure) while it does the real-world version of the preview we saw in that little animation I put up earlier. Just way way slower.

8. Receive that 20 mm Test Cube you wanted, receive adulations and job offers




But this thread is for any DIY, despite the apparent focus on 3D printing

The Eyes Have It fucked around with this message at 00:25 on Jan 30, 2020

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The Eyes Have It
Feb 9, 2008

Third Eye Sees All
...snookums

Because 3D printing is so hot right now and people might be interested in it:

Examples of DIY Gun Stuff
  • Taccom has some 3D models of stuff but the best one IMO is their 3-piece SRS (short range sight).
  • Thingiverse like practically everywhere else is pretty about gun stuff but there is still some good poo poo in there. They are a dying site that's slow with a super lovely search, but they have a lot of stuff.
  • Prusaprinters.org is also a repository for 3D models.
  • People print all kinds of stuff for reloading, take a look: https://www.yeggi.com/q/reloading+tools/
  • MyMiniFactory is a good place for neat stuff. Some paid models, also free ones. https://www.myminifactory.com/


Here are some examples of stuff that can be done to serve as vague inspiration:


22LR Ammo Container - https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:2837937


Crosman 1377 Shoulder Stock - https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:2849091


The SRS (short range sight) which is semi-disposable, just clips onto a rail -- mentioned above from Taccom


The Tacti-sac


Magazine Speed Loader - https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:2528734


Shotgun Shell Holder - https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:711188


STICK A WHOLE GODDAMN BOX OF SHELLS ON YOUR BELT - https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:1672155


The Finger Iron Sights - https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:3370145


Lefty grips for Daisy 717 / 747 - https://github.com/noshbar/Daisy-747-for-lefties


CZ 75 grips - https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:617390


Stupid 80s nerd poo poo


SIG airgun belt loading tool - https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:3001285

There's even some commercial stuff: MK Machining 3D prints reloading stuff like powder funnels and adapters, etc out of conductive filament, so it's anti-static: https://mkmachining.com/product-cat...ng-accessories/
They also 3D print throw levers: https://mkmachining.com/product-cat...2/throw-levers/

This is the place to share, ask, or boast so go hog wild.

The Eyes Have It fucked around with this message at 07:14 on Jan 29, 2020

Miso Beno
Apr 29, 2004


Tryin' to catch me ridin' dirty


Fun Shoe

Whats the best way to learn how to do 3d doodling so i can squirt my bad drawings out in hot snot format?

The Eyes Have It
Feb 9, 2008

Third Eye Sees All
...snookums

tinkercad is a web-based tool that is what you see is what you get flavor of CAD. Personally I'd start there. https://www.tinkercad.com/

Parts Kit
Jun 9, 2006

durr
i have a hole in my head
durr


If you want to go with something more powerful there's also Fusion 360, which is free for home/educational use. In addition to being able to generate STLs for 3d printing it also has the benefit of having a full CAM package so you can also do stuff like generate the g-code for CNC routing with it.

The thing to keep in mind with these CAD programs is all of your parts will start off as a 2D drawing, which you will then extrude into a 3d object and manipulate through additional features. It takes some practice to get used to thinking in this way, but in the long run it's not nearly as bad as it seems.

Parts Kit
Jun 9, 2006

durr
i have a hole in my head
durr


Thought I had some jpegs handy of my projects but I don't. A couple of things I've made that are gun related are scope throw levers and finger adjustable turret caps. I've also mulled over making an adapter that would let me stick a small camera on the back of my spotting scope, so that I could then hook that into a monitor that would rest on the shooting bench. Haven't gotten around to it yet though.

You can kind of see the scope turret caps in this pic. Didn't realize "galaxy black" prusament had sparkles in it when I bought it, lol.


I've also printed two of these and they're pretty neat.
https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:2470700

22 Eargesplitten
Oct 10, 2010

Also sexism, religious bias, jingoism, and so on. Don't do it, people!

Dogs, don't do it either, even if the police man really tries to train you to do it.



FWIW I'm not sure those CZ grips are any good, I had two sets printed from two different patterns, one didn't fit right. When I get home I can see if I can find the one that worked.

Action-Bastard
Jan 1, 2008



That .22 ammo holder is really cool I get a scifi vibe from it. Is there anyone that would sell the finished product? I know it's a stretch but I'm not particularly interested nor in a position to start a 3D printing home set up.

The Eyes Have It
Feb 9, 2008

Third Eye Sees All
...snookums

I made one this past summer, it's pretty cool. It's impractical to ship stuff like this to the USA (it's expensive, I'm in Canada) but maybe you can find someone more local. I found it a pretty easy print.

Parts Kit
Jun 9, 2006

durr
i have a hole in my head
durr


Action-Bastard posted:

That .22 ammo holder is really cool I get a scifi vibe from it. Is there anyone that would sell the finished product? I know it's a stretch but I'm not particularly interested nor in a position to start a 3D printing home set up.
If you don't mind PLA* and depending on your color choices I might be able to be convinced to do it for materials & shipping costs.

*(works good but won't take a ton of summer heat in a car before warping, so don't just leave it in there for days on end)

edit: looks like the plastic cost would be $4, but the time to print would be 14+hours, yikes. Will have to tweak my settings and get back to you on that, might be able to get it down to something more reasonable.

Parts Kit fucked around with this message at 13:05 on Jan 28, 2020

unknonymous
May 16, 2013



3D printing gun stuff is pretty great. I just recently made some PETG scope caps.



Here's a bunch of gun stuff I've designed or found on Thingiverse:
  • Scope throw lever
  • Hooks which fit into gun safe shelving rails
  • Pistol racks for gun safe
  • CZ Accu-Shadow bushing wrench
  • Glock sight pusher (from Thingiverse)
  • CZ Shadow 2 sight pusher (mixed results)
  • Spacers to fit between the magwell of a P-01 and a full length Mec-Gar mag's baseplate
  • Star Super B Grips (these really need a resin printer)
  • RMR plate blank (from Thingiverse but modified)

And some reloading stuff:
  • Hornady progressive case feeder (from Thingiverse)
  • Powder measure vibrating motor attachment (to make 700-X behave better)
  • RCBS bullet feed die bullet feeder
  • Bullet collator (from Thingiverse)
  • Primer pickup tube filler (mostly works)
  • Spent primer catch bin (from Thingiverse)
  • Reloading die stands

Probably some other stuff I can't remember. It's super satisfying to create these little quality of life things.

22 Eargesplitten
Oct 10, 2010

Also sexism, religious bias, jingoism, and so on. Don't do it, people!

Dogs, don't do it either, even if the police man really tries to train you to do it.



22 Eargesplitten posted:

FWIW I'm not sure those CZ grips are any good, I had two sets printed from two different patterns, one didn't fit right. When I get home I can see if I can find the one that worked.

99% sure that these are the ones that fit well on my SP-01 Tactical, all I had to do was shave the supports off and it slid in nice and tight. My friend that printed them helped adjust the palm swell so they fit my giant hands better, the original maker's modeling skills are incredibly impressive, looking at the steps he took to model it.

https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:2190338

Printed them with ABS super hot, be careful if you use adaptive layer height. We tried that once and the top layers were so thin that they fell apart. Might just be a matter of tuning, it was the first time he had messed with that setting and he had set the layer height very low manually.

Crunkjuice
Apr 4, 2007

That could've gotten in my eye!
*launches teargas at unarmed protestors*

I THINK OAKLAND PD'S USE OF EXCESSIVE FORCE WAS JUSTIFIED!


I've got an older primary arms red dot and ive lost one of the adjustment caps. I've contacted PA and they don't have any spares and I'm poo poo out of luck. This looks like something a 3d printer could do, though my local library does. What would the process look like getting one of my adjustment caps copied?

I never thought about 3d printing one until this thread so thanks for making it!

The Eyes Have It
Feb 9, 2008

Third Eye Sees All
...snookums

Parts Kit posted:

edit: looks like the plastic cost would be $4, but the time to print would be 14+hours, yikes. Will have to tweak my settings and get back to you on that, might be able to get it down to something more reasonable.

This isn't really aimed at you, just brings up another "thing" about 3d printing.

Is 14+ hours of print time a lot? Depends. It's a lot like other CNC stuff.

Is 14+ hours of printing a lot on a machine that's capable of safely and reliably being left to print unattended? No.

Is 14+ hours a lot on a printer that must be at least partially babysat throughout that entire process? Oh god yes

The Eyes Have It
Feb 9, 2008

Third Eye Sees All
...snookums

Crunkjuice posted:

I've got an older primary arms red dot and ive lost one of the adjustment caps. I've contacted PA and they don't have any spares and I'm poo poo out of luck. This looks like something a 3d printer could do, though my local library does. What would the process look like getting one of my adjustment caps copied?

I never thought about 3d printing one until this thread so thanks for making it!

I also made a cap for my red dot as an early project

Grab some calipers, even a cheap plastic one (or a ruler and a finely calibrated eyeball) and fire up tinkercad.com to make the model. I remember their tutorials are pretty good, if you're starting from scratch.

Once you make a thing in tinkercad (or whatever other cad program) export an STL file for 3d printing and provide that file to the library or bring it on a USB stick or whatever if you go in person. (The STL file will be used by the printer to poop out a plastic part.)

Just mentally give yourself permission to not get it 100% right the first time. Think of the first version as something that surfaces problems to fix with a revision.

Action-Bastard
Jan 1, 2008



Parts Kit posted:

If you don't mind PLA* and depending on your color choices I might be able to be convinced to do it for materials & shipping costs.

*(works good but won't take a ton of summer heat in a car before warping, so don't just leave it in there for days on end)

edit: looks like the plastic cost would be $4, but the time to print would be 14+hours, yikes. Will have to tweak my settings and get back to you on that, might be able to get it down to something more reasonable.

Hey I appreciate you offering. If you can work it out so its feasible for you, $4 + shipping is very doable for me. Post in here or PM me when you have it figured out man, thanks again.

Parts Kit
Jun 9, 2006

durr
i have a hole in my head
durr


The Eyes Have It posted:

This isn't really aimed at you, just brings up another "thing" about 3d printing.


Even though I have an awesome Prusa I still don't fully trust it to run overnight or fully unattended.

Action-Bastard posted:

Hey I appreciate you offering. If you can work it out so its feasible for you, $4 + shipping is very doable for me. Post in here or PM me when you have it figured out man, thanks again.
I think I can get it down to ~8 hours total for a whole box. The real bitch is the main body, all those holes take a while to print. I'll do a test this weekend and get back to you on if it's doable or not.

Action-Bastard
Jan 1, 2008



Parts Kit posted:

I think I can get it down to ~8 hours total for a whole box. The real bitch is the main body, all those holes take a while to print. I'll do a test this weekend and get back to you on if it's doable or not.

Not to be picky but, do I get to pick the colors or can this plastic take a coat of Krylon without issue?

Thanks again.

Parts Kit
Jun 9, 2006

durr
i have a hole in my head
durr


Depends on what you want vs what's available vs if it's a color I'll use for anything else. Yellow, orange, black, and white are all colors definitely I'll use again. Neon pink? Not so much.

They -should- be able to take Krylon, maybe with a primer layer required, but honestly I've never tried.

The Eyes Have It
Feb 9, 2008

Third Eye Sees All
...snookums

Parts Kit posted:

Even though I have an awesome Prusa I still don't fully trust it to run overnight or fully unattended.

Yeah, my Prusa also occasionally barfs a print that SHOULD work fine. But I've used low-end commercial / prosumer printers that Just Work(tm) however and it changes a lot being able to just set and forget and let the machine do the work & know what you're reliably getting out the other end.

The Eyes Have It
Feb 9, 2008

Third Eye Sees All
...snookums



Here's a moving-parts P.08 Luger that's been more or less designed to have its parts 3D printed.
https://www.myminifactory.com/objec...l-assembly-5545


e: This model reminded me to put MyMiniFactory in the 2nd post with other resources - https://www.myminifactory.com/

The Eyes Have It fucked around with this message at 23:55 on Jan 28, 2020

Action-Bastard
Jan 1, 2008



Parts Kit posted:

Depends on what you want vs what's available vs if it's a color I'll use for anything else. Yellow, orange, black, and white are all colors definitely I'll use again. Neon pink? Not so much.

They -should- be able to take Krylon, maybe with a primer layer required, but honestly I've never tried.

Hey black base with a white or orange sleeve works for me. Preferably white.

Otherwise I can paint it myself.

Parts Kit
Jun 9, 2006

durr
i have a hole in my head
durr


Black/white I can certainly do! Will keep you updated.

unknonymous
May 16, 2013



After a 16 month hiatus I was inspired to spend 30 minutes re-doing my broken Star Super B grips model. Now to continue never printing it.

The Eyes Have It
Feb 9, 2008

Third Eye Sees All
...snookums

^^^ Did you model that yourself?



Also, here's an example of some real-world gun related 3D printing. MK Machining 3D prints reloading stuff like powder funnels and adapters, etc out of conductive filament, so it's anti-static: https://mkmachining.com/product-cat...ng-accessories/


They also 3D print throw levers: https://mkmachining.com/product-cat...2/throw-levers/

unknonymous
May 16, 2013



The Eyes Have It posted:

^^^ Did you model that yourself?

I did! Haven't printed that exact iteration yet but this is what its two predecessors looked like at 0.20mm layers from a so-so FDM printer. Pretty sure it was 0.20mm anyway. After starting work on the model someone gave me two sets of wood grips for the gun, so it's been neglected.

astropika
Jul 5, 2007
no, not really

Miso Beno posted:

Whats the best way to learn how to do 3d doodling so i can squirt my bad drawings out in hot snot format?

Fusion 360 is free for hobbyists https://www.autodesk.com/campaigns/...0-for-hobbyists and is what I learned with.

Elite Taco
Feb 3, 2010


Is Fusion 360 what I use to modify plans I download? If I want to modify fill rates and stuff like that?

If one of you guys have a second - I would love a quick how-to from Download your file from wherever -> do this -> do this -> put on SD card -> insert into printer.

In the meantime I will trial and error error error.

Parts Kit
Jun 9, 2006

durr
i have a hole in my head
durr


Elite Taco posted:

Is Fusion 360 what I use to modify plans I download? If I want to modify fill rates and stuff like that?

If one of you guys have a second - I would love a quick how-to from Download your file from wherever -> do this -> do this -> put on SD card -> insert into printer.

In the meantime I will trial and error error error.
Nah, Fusion 360 is what you do to model things and generate STL files. What you're wanting is a slicer. Programs include Cura and Slic3r. I like Slic3r better personally.

What printer do you have? We can probably help you figure out what settings to use and how to set up the slicer.

Basic workflow is:
1. Create or download STL file. *(see important note at bottom)
2. Import STL into the slicer of your choice.
3. Arrange/orient it on the build plate as necessary (some STLs may be made in a way that requires rotation for optimal printing for instance, or maybe you want to print 2 at once).
4. Slice.
5. Preview slice and decide if it's okay.
6. Adjust settings (layer heights, infill, etc) if desired and reslice.
7. Generate G-Code with the export option.
8. Load the G-Code file onto your SD card.
9. Insert SD card in printer, tell the printer which file you want to print, go hog wild.

*Note that this must be generated in metric units, sometimes people brainfart and upload inch STLs onto thingiverse and they come out way too tiny to be able to print at all, much less correctly.

For more deets on the workflow we'll need more deets from you on what you've got.

The Eyes Have It
Feb 9, 2008

Third Eye Sees All
...snookums

^^^^ What he said, but with some visual aids. I'll add this to the OP.

Elite Taco posted:

Is Fusion 360 what I use to modify plans I download? If I want to modify fill rates and stuff like that?

Short answer: no. To modify fill rates and stuff is done on the 3D printer's software's end.

Longer answer: Fusion 360 is used to create 3D CAD drawings (models). Generally speaking, when people export those CAD models for 3D printing use (an STL file), they are no longer (easily) modified in a CAD program. However, simple operations like scaling, cutting into parts, and so on are fairly easily done -- no Fusion 360 required.


Elite Taco posted:

If one of you guys have a second - I would love a quick how-to from Download your file from wherever -> do this -> do this -> put on SD card -> insert into printer.

In the meantime I will trial and error error error.


This is a really good question and resources online pretty much ignore people's need to know this completely. In fact, I did a quick Facetime with a buddy to show him the whole workflow from end to end so he could put everything into context. He ordered a printer that afternoon.


Let's say you want to 3D print this rockin' hot new sculpture called "20 mm test cube". You're going to turn this:
>>>> into >>>>


Here's the basic workflow:

1. Get a 3D model of what you want to print. An STL file, in other words. Two basic ways to do this:
2. Just FYI: assuming Windows, double-click the STL file and open it in Microsoft 3D builder. In that program you can look to make sure it looks right in a basic sense and can also do simple modifications and operations (but you can't do serious CAD functions on it.) Anyway just FYI you can open and look and gently caress with it a bit without firing up "3D printer software".

3. Fire up your 3D printer's software. Example: PrusaSlicer (Prusa's software for their printers). Drag and drop that STL file in and you'll see something like this (click it for big):

That's the cube dropped there in the middle of that plate. The plate represents the actual, physical build plate of the actual machine. This program is where you do things like:
  • Move the model around on the plate, like for if you're printing many objects and laying out where you want them to be, or putting it on its side or whatever.
  • Simple stuff like scaling it up or down to change the size.
  • In the upper right is poo poo like telling it how much infill (how hollow or solid the part is), what layer resolution, and so on. In general the nicer / solider the slower it is to make.
  • The tabs to the upper left go to nitty gritty details about how the machine operates (in depth poo poo, like how fast to do certain operations and junk.)

4. Once the basics like model placement and layer resolution & infill are set, then you do one thing before actual printing: you slice the object. Here's what the gently caress that means:
  • The 3D object is processed by the slicer, which means the program literally computes exactly how the printer will move and where it will poop out molten plastic and for how long.
  • Once the model is sliced, you can view a preview to make sure it looks sane.
Here's a simulation of how the object should get built, layer by layer, from the bottom up.

You basically just look at this and make sure it looks sane. It's good practice, and sometimes the slicer can freak out on or misinterpret small details or edge cases, and you fix them by going into the slicer settings, making a tweak, and then re-slicing and checking to see if it's fixed.

5. Then you get the sliced job (a file format called GCODE) which is in the secret language of the machines. It is a literal step-by-step in machine terms (e.g. move this motor this much, now turn on this heater that much, now move this motor that much, etc etc).

How exactly the GCODE file gets to the printer can be different per printer. Two of my printers allows upload over Wi-Fi. One requires sneakernet on an SD card. But it's still just putting e.g. "20mm_test_cube.gcode" onto the printer in the end.

6. Once the job is uploaded to the printer, you can generally use the printer's controls to:
  • Yawn hi I am a printer, ok I'm awake hello how are you
  • "Hello Printer I am fine please print this job"
  • OK that's sure a print job alright, stand by
At which point the printer needs care and feeding like heating up, making sure it's loaded with filament, and all that other junk.

7. The printer will then make motor noises for the next X hours (or whatever, the test cube mentioned would be <1 hour for sure) while it does the real-world version of the preview we saw in that little animation I put up earlier. Just way way slower.

8. Receive that 20 mm Test Cube you wanted, receive adulations and job offers

astropika
Jul 5, 2007
no, not really

To add to the above, STLs are meshes and are not conducive to editing, you really want the original CAD files. But, if you must use the STL then you can use something like meshmixer to sculpt the mesh.

You can also import a mesh into fusion 360 to edit (and turn it into t-spline), but if it has a lot of faces performance is going to be absolutely terrible, and it'll be a real slog to turn it into something usable.

Elite Taco
Feb 3, 2010


Awesome - thank you! I managed to make it print a butterfly and have a giant spool of cheap PLA. I have ~plans and a spool of glass-filled nylon filament for building stronger things, but want to get up to speed before I start using actually expensive filament.

I have the monoprice IIIP (Monoprice Maker Ultimate) Looks like this:

Elite Taco fucked around with this message at 02:55 on Jan 30, 2020

Captain Log
Oct 2, 2006

Captain Log posted:

"I AINT DYING! Choo choo motherfucker!"



Fun Shoe

If I was fifteen, Id be all over this stuff to print my own Domos. At my age, this stuff is pure loving wizardry.

I salute you all.

Elite Taco
Feb 3, 2010


Dudes - thanks for the overview posts. I am much clearer on how the heck to go from idea to printing now.

Looks like my printer came with a modified/custom version of CURA (so that's my slicer) and I've gone to thingverse and found a few plans. I've noticed no consistent file type, some are STL, some CAD, some gcode. Open source, best source, I suppose.

Parts Kit
Jun 9, 2006

durr
i have a hole in my head
durr


G-Code you'll want to avoid as it's fully processed already. Unless it is set up for your printer model it'll be a pain in the rear end, and if the person who generated it made any mistakes or weird decisions you won't be able to correct them.

Also on the 22lr box, did a test print of the lid and it turned out good. A little annoying to remove the supports on but otherwise good. Will try another test without supports, might not work but hey plastic is cheap.

Wa11y
Jul 23, 2002

Did I say "cookies?" I meant, "Fire in your face!"

Captain Log posted:

If I was fifteen, Id be all over this stuff to print my own Domos. At my age, this stuff is pure loving wizardry.

I salute you all.

What I feel I lack is the imagination or artistic vision to design something. Watching a 3D print video (or CNC machining video) I'm always dumbfounded at the design part of it. They just open their software, click a few buttons and start with a square or a cylinder, click a few other buttons and drag their mouse a few times, and then proclaim, "And now you've created a Moss-Covered Three-Handled Family Gradunza just like that, so let's send over to the printer." And I just have no idea how they do that part, either from the standpoint of running the software or from picturing the end result in their head and all then all steps they take to get to that end result from a basic 3D form.

Parts Kit
Jun 9, 2006

durr
i have a hole in my head
durr


Action-Bastard posted:

Hey black base with a white or orange sleeve works for me. Preferably white.

Otherwise I can paint it myself.
I decided to order some pretty red filament too so if you'd prefer that over one of the other colors let me know.

Parts Kit
Jun 9, 2006

durr
i have a hole in my head
durr


Wa11y posted:

What I feel I lack is the imagination or artistic vision to design something. Watching a 3D print video (or CNC machining video) I'm always dumbfounded at the design part of it. They just open their software, click a few buttons and start with a square or a cylinder, click a few other buttons and drag their mouse a few times, and then proclaim, "And now you've created a Moss-Covered Three-Handled Family Gradunza just like that, so let's send over to the printer." And I just have no idea how they do that part, either from the standpoint of running the software or from picturing the end result in their head and all then all steps they take to get to that end result from a basic 3D form.
Like a lot of things it is something that requires a lot of practice to get down.

Here's the short version of it:
You imagine a part
You figure out what is the main body of the part and imagine what a slice of it would be as a 2d drawing
Draw that, "extrude" (basically stretch) it into a 3d shape
Add drawings for other features like cut outs or projections by making 2d representations of them like with the main body
Extrude those features and join them to the main body
Add finishing touches like chamfers/fillets

The hard part of the process is breaking down a 3d object into many smaller 2d bits in your mind. The nice thing is if it's a multipart assembly there are tools to help ensure you don't have one part be too big in a dimension or whatnot, and to help you visualize how it will all go together in the end. The hardest thing for me is coming up with a part in the first place though, kind of like wanting to draw but having no clue what to draw.

There are tons of tutorials online for Fusion 360. I'd suggest you download it and give it a try with some simple stuff. Start with cubes, cylinders, brackets, other doohickies. The fundamental little things you do there will be the base for more complex parts -- that is to say a complex part is really just a ton of little things added together. Kind of like how a complex computer program is a fuckton of smaller algorithms all tied together to create one big thing.

The interface takes a bit of getting used to but it's not bad.

Minky
Aug 12, 2003



A user named Red_McCloud on AR15.com made an awesome Blade style pistol brace that looks like the old CAR-15 stock.

Thread with lots of pics

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Brackit
Jan 23, 2019


I did it before, and now I'm doing it again. Mechanical this time.

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