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Javid
Oct 21, 2004

My sole partiality is to that delectable spiced meat. Any additional confederation of vegetables shall not compromise the pie as I see it.

One of my favorite 3d printer bonus functions is that now when I want a weirdly specific tool that isn't available locally, it's faster to just will it into being than to comb the internet looking for it. So I've been loving around with pocket screwdrivers that hold 1/4" impact bits:



The long precision handles with spinny knobs were the main point; I'm sure somebody makes something similar, but I can't recall seeing one that wasn't way huger to accommodate a ratcheting mechanism and/or storage for a zillion bits, neither of which I need in a pocket screwdriver.

The orbs were just an experiment that seems to work.

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The Eyes Have It
Feb 9, 2008

Third Eye Sees All
...snookums

Those are some really nice looking prints.

Vim Fuego
Jun 1, 2000

I just had an epiphany: the internet is useless!





Ultra Carp

The Eyes Have It posted:

Those are some really nice looking prints.

Javid
Oct 21, 2004

My sole partiality is to that delectable spiced meat. Any additional confederation of vegetables shall not compromise the pie as I see it.

this thing prints great as long as all the holes with dimensions that actually matter are vertical

Kiavahr
Oct 17, 2013



Outrageous Lumpwad

My trick for horizontal holes has always been to add threads. A hand tap is great for turning that weird oval shape into a good circle, and plus now you can use set screws/whatever in there. If you plan on cycling the threads often, adding a helicoil ups your strength and durability by a couple factors of magnitude too.

Javid
Oct 21, 2004

My sole partiality is to that delectable spiced meat. Any additional confederation of vegetables shall not compromise the pie as I see it.

I haven't had great luck with machine threads in plastic like that. However, just cleaning up the holes with a drill bit is easy and handles the issue, as long as I HAVE a bit in that size. This has also been an unexpected side benefit to the orb driver:



Doesn't work on hexagonal holes, however.

Naked Bear
Apr 15, 2007

Boners was recorded before a studio audience that was alive!


For threads, unless they're large, coarse threads (think soda bottle), you're probably better off using some sort of insert. Helicoils are certainly an option, but those also require you to cut threads into the plastic first.

One really great option is to use brass heat-set inserts (e.g. https://www.mcmaster.com/catalog/127/3569), which you can simply heat up with a soldering iron and press in (specialty tips also exist for these so that you're not ruining your nice tips). You'll want to increase the wall thickness of your print and (when possible) also tweak the geometry of the hole you're pressing them into so that the plastic evenly melts around the entire insert. If I can remember later, I'll post some sketches of the last part I printed specifically for use with the inserts I linked above.

(But yeah, for horizontal holes in general, I'd still just increase wall thickness and then ream them out with a bit or whatever else.)

Javid
Oct 21, 2004

My sole partiality is to that delectable spiced meat. Any additional confederation of vegetables shall not compromise the pie as I see it.

I just have a mini tackle box of assorted 6-32 and 1/4-20 hardware, which covers 99.999% of my projects. (And the 6-32 is really 85% of it)

It never even occurred to me to dick around with threads in plastic in a world where I can walk to Ace and pay 11 pennies for a hex nut. However, mistakes producing undersized holes have ended up holding a thread well enough to save a nut in a couple odd cases I've had, so it's not entirely without merit

infrared35
Jan 12, 2005

border patrol qt


Plaster Town Cop

Javid posted:

However, mistakes producing undersized holes have ended up holding a thread well enough to save a nut in a couple odd cases I've had, so it's not entirely without merit

ur not entirely without merit

shalafi4
Feb 20, 2011

another medical bills avatar

Javid posted:

I just have a mini tackle box of assorted 6-32 and 1/4-20 hardware, which covers 99.999% of my projects. (And the 6-32 is really 85% of it)

It never even occurred to me to dick around with threads in plastic in a world where I can walk to Ace and pay 11 pennies for a hex nut. However, mistakes producing undersized holes have ended up holding a thread well enough to save a nut in a couple odd cases I've had, so it's not entirely without merit

Size the hole to be ~0.010~0.020" under what the tap size is. Also make sure that your # wall layers give you a full 3 layers beyond the maximum extent of the threads.


Do that you can make descent strength bolt holes with 0.2mm layer heights up to ~28tpi threads (24 or 20 is better but 28 will work) Do NOT use a forming tap on its own, it'll cause delamination issues.


Our best luck was using an undersize heat treat tap. think it was for H13? (one of the tool steels that shrink when they harden instead of expand) So it cuts the threads ~0.005" undersize. Then run a forming tap into it, and then heat it up with a soldering iron up to ~25C under your printing temperature. Let the forming tap sit until it fully cools then remove it. (it'll take some oomph to get it to pop loose, some high temp mold release spray helps a lot but is pricy for just doing 3d printed holes)


If you've got random 3d printing/threading questions let me know. I used to help with guys doing "what works" research for Stratasys.

shalafi4 fucked around with this message at 20:49 on May 26, 2021

Naked Bear
Apr 15, 2007

Boners was recorded before a studio audience that was alive!


Below is what I've been doing for heat-set inserts. Apparently the most recent one I did was, uh, a wee bit smaller than I remembered (for an M2.5 insert), but the idea is the same for more "normal" sizes. I simply create a tapered bore with a step near the top. The step is there mainly to make it easier to seat the insert and keep it level while pressing it in. In this example, the bore diameter shrinks from 0.2 mm to 0.4 mm under that of the insert itself, so there's plenty of plastic for it to melt and bite into. The insert I used here is 4.4 mm at the top, 3.8 mm at the bottom, so the bore goes from 5% to 10% under size. If it's a blind hole, I try to make it a hair longer than the insert so that any excess plastic has room to squish into the bottom. There wasn't enough wiggle room in the part in this example to do that, but it turned out just fine anyway.



Installing the insert is very straightforward: you simply place it into the hole, place the tip of the iron into it, hold for a moment or two until the plastic begins to heat up, then gently and steadily press the insert in. You can easily make it flush by removing the iron early and just pressing the top of the insert against your work surface or something else flat. It only takes a couple of tries to get this down pat and it's super easy.

Naked Bear fucked around with this message at 02:17 on May 27, 2021

taqueso
Mar 8, 2004









You can use a hotend and nozzle in place of a soldering iron if you don't have one.

L0cke17
Nov 29, 2013



Naked Bear posted:

Below is what I've been doing for heat-set inserts. Apparently the most recent one I did was, uh, a wee bit smaller than I remembered (for an M2.5 insert), but the idea is the same for more "normal" sizes. I simply create a tapered bore with a step near the top. The step is there mainly to make it easier to seat the insert and keep it level while pressing it in. In this example, the bore diameter shrinks from 0.2 mm to 0.4 mm under that of the insert itself, so there's plenty of plastic for it to melt and bite into. The insert I used here is 4.4 mm at the top, 3.8 mm at the bottom, so the bore goes from 5% to 10% under size. If it's a blind hole, I try to make it a hair longer than the insert so that any excess plastic has room to squish into the bottom. There wasn't enough wiggle room in the part in this example to do that, but it turned out just fine anyway.



Installing the insert is very straightforward: you simply place it into the hole, place the tip of the iron into it, hold for a moment or two until the plastic begins to heat up, then gently and steadily press the insert in. You can easily make it flush by removing the iron early and just pressing the top of the insert against your work surface or something else flat. It only takes a couple of tries to get this down pat and it's super easy.

Depending on your plastic composition/level of care you do this with you may also want to thread a screw in when you use the soldering iron to melt it into place.

At work we use m2.5 heatsets in production and a sloppy assembly person can sometimes melt plastic up into the threading if they're not careful making it impossible to thread a screw in all the way.

Javid
Oct 21, 2004

My sole partiality is to that delectable spiced meat. Any additional confederation of vegetables shall not compromise the pie as I see it.

The extant dedicated 3d print fastener hoard:



Which reminds me - anybody know if there's a cura setting to insert a "pause till button press" at a chosen point in the print? It would let me do some fun two-tone stuff I've been thinking of - like making raised lettering white on a black part - but also it would let me entomb hex nuts in internal cavities with no external seam, which would be rad as gently caress

armorer
Aug 6, 2012

I like metal.

Javid posted:

The extant dedicated 3d print fastener hoard:



Which reminds me - anybody know if there's a cura setting to insert a "pause till button press" at a chosen point in the print? It would let me do some fun two-tone stuff I've been thinking of - like making raised lettering white on a black part - but also it would let me entomb hex nuts in internal cavities with no external seam, which would be rad as gently caress

https://m.all3dp.com/2/cura-pause-at-height-how-to-do-it/

Javid
Oct 21, 2004

My sole partiality is to that delectable spiced meat. Any additional confederation of vegetables shall not compromise the pie as I see it.

yesssss



this changes everything

The Eyes Have It
Feb 9, 2008

Third Eye Sees All
...snookums

Reminds me of the nut trap in a knob I designed for my 3d printed cheek rest, I was really happy with it.

That kind of looks like a CAPTIVE nut, though.As in the print will continue over it. Am I right?

The Eyes Have It
Feb 9, 2008

Third Eye Sees All
...snookums

One of these days I'm going to get these done in ASA.

The Eyes Have It fucked around with this message at 02:27 on May 29, 2021

Javid
Oct 21, 2004

My sole partiality is to that delectable spiced meat. Any additional confederation of vegetables shall not compromise the pie as I see it.

The Eyes Have It posted:

That kind of looks like a CAPTIVE nut, though.As in the print will continue over it. Am I right?

Yep! I've made slip-over leverage enhancers like yours before. mostly because I wanted a nylon insert stop nut that also had wings. though yours appears to hold them in similarly to how my screwdriver works, which is awesome and I'm stealing it



just entombing them solves a lot of problems, though, and makes the finished product more seamless which is +++. I've done it with halves that I then glue together around one or more nuts, but this way is just tidier

Javid fucked around with this message at 00:32 on May 29, 2021

Kiavahr
Oct 17, 2013



Outrageous Lumpwad

Javid posted:

yesssss



this changes everything

That reminds me of a video I saw a while back about embedding steel wire into a print in basically the same way to add a bunch of tensile strength. For whatever reason the youtuber didn't actually connect the wire at the ends to form a contiguous loop but I feel like all you'd need is a crimp to really make it work.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XpDG8VxZsw4

In terms of applications, could be good for reinforcing long strappy things? Or you could weave a bunch of wire into a chunkier part like the rebar grid inside concrete.

Kiavahr fucked around with this message at 14:02 on May 29, 2021

shalafi4
Feb 20, 2011

another medical bills avatar

Kiavahr posted:

That reminds me of a video I saw a while back about embedding steel wire into a print in basically the same way to add a bunch of tensile strength. For whatever reason the youtuber didn't actually connect the wire at the ends to form a contiguous loop but I feel like all you'd need is a crimp to really make it work.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XpDG8VxZsw4

In terms of applications, could be good for reinforcing long strappy things? Or you could weave a bunch of wire into a chunkier part like the rebar grid inside concrete.

It's something that works well in theory and in initial tests.

Problem is the reinforcement material generally doesn't stick to the 3D print very well. So in very short order it delaminates off of the cable/rebar/mesh/whatever and starts pulling it apart.

The Eyes Have It
Feb 9, 2008

Third Eye Sees All
...snookums

Markforged (and a few others, but markforged is really good) has machines that do that with carbon fiber, so it's a print reinforced with continuous carbon fiber instead of tiny fragments embedded in the filament (which is what "carbon fiber" filament usually is)

It makes loving STRONG prints.

Javid
Oct 21, 2004

My sole partiality is to that delectable spiced meat. Any additional confederation of vegetables shall not compromise the pie as I see it.

Nothing with tension like that, but I make liberal use of metal bits in places where they'll help with strength. Something like a 30 cent square key from Ace can make all the difference in a borderline part

edit for actual content: I'm prototyping a dumb toy currently.



PLA so it may or may not stand up to use, but this stuff has genuinely exceeded my expectations since I got control of my own whole rear end printer. A lot of my prints prior were from what I now know were dumpster grade diy printers at the hack lab, which set low expectations. Now even with my rudimentary cargo cult level absorption of 3d printing principles, I've managed to poo poo out A Lot of functional prints with no failures in use to date, so I'm enjoying seeing what I can do.

To improve my odds, I've thrown in some strategic bits of Ace Hardware bulk bin fodder. Cavities for an 1/8x1" square key and 1/8x1/2" round pin hereabouts:



The other holes are the 6-32 screws, putting a decent amount of steel directly in contact with the blade. Along with some nice clamping force, I hope this will hold a blade in place under the forces it needs to. I think the odds are good enough to bet $1.30 of plastic on for some careful heavy use testing, under the assumption that it'll ultimately have to be done in PET or something.

I am not entirely happy with where the square key is, but it was the least bad of the three available sides so it's being tried first

Javid fucked around with this message at 10:13 on Jun 1, 2021

bulletsponge13
Apr 28, 2010


Would one of you fine goons want to print a G36 to pic rail adapter for me? I'd be willing to pay, and the model already exists, so it could save you some brain sweat.

Javid
Oct 21, 2004

My sole partiality is to that delectable spiced meat. Any additional confederation of vegetables shall not compromise the pie as I see it.

Can you link the model? You have my axe if it's something my Ender can handle and can be PLA in one of the three colors I have

Javid fucked around with this message at 08:21 on Jun 3, 2021

shalafi4
Feb 20, 2011

another medical bills avatar

Javid posted:



I am not entirely happy with where the square key is, but it was the least bad of the three available sides so it's being tried first

What's your goal for the square bit? backer to keep the back end of the blade from digging in?

Might be able to do the same thing with a couple short round pins set vertically.

If you want another brain to give the print a shot let me know. I've also got some PETG that I could give it a shot with as well.

bulletsponge13
Apr 28, 2010


Javid posted:

Can you link the model? You have my axe if it's something my Ender can handle and can be PLA in one of the three colors I have

https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:4219658/comments

Ygolonac
Nov 26, 2007

pre:
*************
CLUTCH  NIXON
*************

The Hero We Need


I've got an extra paycheck coming, and after buying tax stamps and other poo poo, I may have enough for a noisy toy - I'm debating between a 3D printer and a mini-5-axis mill, so instead of spending ridiculous money on gun- and other-stuff, I can spend *really* ridiculous money on the ability to gently caress up gun- and other-stuff myself and cut out the middle man.

From this thread and the 3D-printing thread elsewhere in the forums, I have some basics on that, but my machining knowledge is limited to high school shiv shop class, and monkey-simple drill-pressing with a Bridgeport back when I worked at the plastic plant. So, can anyone give some pointers on the best places to buy meth and semi-human hookers, because I strongly suspect the $400 Chinesium CNC machines will not be up to the task of not-building a non-belt-fed not-an-upper-receiver-nope not-for-semiautomatic-firearm-use cosplay accessory...

(I know enough that the mill is the gateway drug, because you then need tooling, and then expansions for capacity/capability/functions, which require more tooling, and dear god why is Skynet requisitioning my spare bedroom full of machinery while playing Barry White...)

Gray Stormy
Dec 19, 2006



You may be able to work aluminum, albeit VERY slowly.

The web app on https://fswizard.com/ is a fantastic tool to get you in the ballpark on f/s data.

What are you going to use to model/program?

shalafi4
Feb 20, 2011

another medical bills avatar

Ygolonac posted:

I've got an extra paycheck coming, and after buying tax stamps and other poo poo, I may have enough for a noisy toy - I'm debating between a 3D printer and a mini-5-axis mill, so instead of spending ridiculous money on gun- and other-stuff, I can spend *really* ridiculous money on the ability to gently caress up gun- and other-stuff myself and cut out the middle man.

From this thread and the 3D-printing thread elsewhere in the forums, I have some basics on that, but my machining knowledge is limited to high school shiv shop class, and monkey-simple drill-pressing with a Bridgeport back when I worked at the plastic plant. So, can anyone give some pointers on the best places to buy meth and semi-human hookers, because I strongly suspect the $400 Chinesium CNC machines will not be up to the task of not-building a non-belt-fed not-an-upper-receiver-nope not-for-semiautomatic-firearm-use cosplay accessory...

(I know enough that the mill is the gateway drug, because you then need tooling, and then expansions for capacity/capability/functions, which require more tooling, and dear god why is Skynet requisitioning my spare bedroom full of machinery while playing Barry White...)

What mini 5 axis mill are you looking at?

Usually the cost of a 3d printer doesn't overlap with a mini mill by a good amount.

Ygolonac
Nov 26, 2007

pre:
*************
CLUTCH  NIXON
*************

The Hero We Need


Gray Stormy posted:

You may be able to work aluminum, albeit VERY slowly.

The web app on https://fswizard.com/ is a fantastic tool to get you in the ballpark on f/s data.

What are you going to use to model/program?

Buuuuuhhhh... <starts looking for old issues of Commodore 64 & Amiga magazines> see, this is why I'm asking dumbass questions like this, I'm watching some of the YubTub videos and dude is going all Inuit carving "cut off everything that doesn't look like a walrus turbine fan" and poo poo.

Slow is good. Slow is me. Slow is cheap, especially when learning - you can maybe catch the big stupid error(s) before the material is totally destroyed, and maybe could be butchered into something else.

shalafi4 posted:

What mini 5 axis mill are you looking at?

Usually the cost of a 3d printer doesn't overlap with a mini mill by a good amount.

Again, just feeling out by watching clickbait reviews for cheap-and-still-overpriced-because-the-listed-specs-are-horseshit stuff like baby spot and stick welders, mini-mills and multiaxis things.

Ender 3 V2 is running $279 from the manufacturer on Amazon, as of like 30 seconds ago, and a lot of low-end grindy things seem to be talked at around $350-450-ish, which may be outdated pricing. And at least they don't seem to offer 200 vAC/60 amps directly through the exterior, like some of the welding poo poo.

Javid
Oct 21, 2004

My sole partiality is to that delectable spiced meat. Any additional confederation of vegetables shall not compromise the pie as I see it.

An Ender 3 is a great use of a couple hundred bucks if a printer will give you the jollies you seek from this budget decision

shalafi4
Feb 20, 2011

another medical bills avatar

Ygolonac posted:

Buuuuuhhhh... <starts looking for old issues of Commodore 64 & Amiga magazines> see, this is why I'm asking dumbass questions like this, I'm watching some of the YubTub videos and dude is going all Inuit carving "cut off everything that doesn't look like a walrus turbine fan" and poo poo.

Slow is good. Slow is me. Slow is cheap, especially when learning - you can maybe catch the big stupid error(s) before the material is totally destroyed, and maybe could be butchered into something else.
Again, just feeling out by watching clickbait reviews for cheap-and-still-overpriced-because-the-listed-specs-are-horseshit stuff like baby spot and stick welders, mini-mills and multiaxis things.

Ender 3 V2 is running $279 from the manufacturer on Amazon, as of like 30 seconds ago, and a lot of low-end grindy things seem to be talked at around $350-450-ish, which may be outdated pricing. And at least they don't seem to offer 200 vAC/60 amps directly through the exterior, like some of the welding poo poo.

110% recommend an ender 3 or similar. For the money you'll be tinkering/printing ALL sorts of things for a long time. Especially if you're a person who likes to tinker with things.

There are better printers out there but most of the "better" bits are quality of life things. (and wind up being twice the money or more)



I've got an Ender 3 V1 and the only complaint that I have with it is I didn't get a CR10S so I can print giant things.

Enders can be a little bit picky/finicky at the start (most of that is you learning how to 3d print) however once they're dialed in you're good to go.

Gray Stormy
Dec 19, 2006



Ygolonac posted:

Buuuuuhhhh... <starts looking for old issues of Commodore 64 & Amiga magazines> see, this is why I'm asking dumbass questions like this, I'm watching some of the YubTub videos and dude is going all Inuit carving "cut off everything that doesn't look like a walrus turbine fan" and poo poo.

Slow is good. Slow is me. Slow is cheap, especially when learning - you can maybe catch the big stupid error(s) before the material is totally destroyed, and maybe could be butchered into something else.
Again, just feeling out by watching clickbait reviews for cheap-and-still-overpriced-because-the-listed-specs-are-horseshit stuff like baby spot and stick welders, mini-mills and multiaxis things.

Feel free to PM if you ever have any really goofy questions you dont want to ask here.

Also, maybe shoot me your address with some collet/chuck sizes youll be running and Ill send you some neat stuff

Gray Stormy
Dec 19, 2006



I found a small amount of glow in the dark G10 in our material room.

I have to make glock mag floorplates out of it now.

Javid
Oct 21, 2004

My sole partiality is to that delectable spiced meat. Any additional confederation of vegetables shall not compromise the pie as I see it.

Glow prints are the best

Javid
Oct 21, 2004

My sole partiality is to that delectable spiced meat. Any additional confederation of vegetables shall not compromise the pie as I see it.

shalafi4 posted:

What's your goal for the square bit? backer to keep the back end of the blade from digging in?

Might be able to do the same thing with a couple short round pins set vertically.

General reinforcement so the pressure of use is distributed across 3mm of layers instead of all being focused on 0.025" of the back edge of the blade.


oof, a PLA one of those would die immediately due to heat probably, that's a job for someone who has PET on hand

e: dog edit for accidentally double posting

Javid fucked around with this message at 22:24 on Jun 4, 2021

Cyrano4747
Sep 25, 2006

Behind every great engineer is someone just hoping the "genius" doesn't bankrupt everyone.



Javid posted:

Glow prints are the best



I love this.

Javid
Oct 21, 2004

My sole partiality is to that delectable spiced meat. Any additional confederation of vegetables shall not compromise the pie as I see it.

1kg of good quality glow PLA was like, $24. I've been making dumb poo poo with it for months. it's fully worth having on hand to let your inner child play with.

the specific stuff I have is also nicer to the touch than the perfectly smooth plain colored PLA. it has some kind of granules in it that glow a little brighter and add some texture to it that I enjoy. I have been told that this also makes it more abrasive, but nozzles are cheap

Latest vaguely serious business project has been a set of tail removal tools for my taxidermist partner:



shalafi4 posted:

110% recommend an ender 3 or similar. For the money you'll be tinkering/printing ALL sorts of things for a long time. Especially if you're a person who likes to tinker with things.

the analogy I would use in this subforum is that an ender 3 is the 10/22 of 3d printers, in that you can get it for $2xx and it'll be decent out of the box, with the option to shotgun cheap upgrades into it over time if/when you need to. My only upgrades (that weren't printed) have been a metal extruder and a glass build plate (E: and stiffer bed springs) which solved literally all of the problems I was having early on

Javid fucked around with this message at 07:05 on Jun 5, 2021

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Ygolonac
Nov 26, 2007

pre:
*************
CLUTCH  NIXON
*************

The Hero We Need


Well, thanks for advice everyone, I've still got a couple weeks to be future endeavor'd wait on that check, so I have time to look around a

SQUIRREL!

<goes chasing after some other expensive hobby I just saw>

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