Register a SA Forums Account here!
JOINING THE SA FORUMS WILL REMOVE THIS BIG AD, THE ANNOYING UNDERLINED ADS, AND STUPID INTERSTITIAL ADS!!!

You can: log in, read the tech support FAQ, or request your lost password. This dumb message (and those ads) will appear on every screen until you register! Get rid of this crap by registering your own SA Forums Account and joining roughly 150,000 Goons, for the one-time price of $9.95! We charge money because it costs us money per month for bills, and since we don't believe in showing ads to our users, we try to make the money back through forum registrations.
 
  • Post
  • Reply
Syenite
Jun 21, 2011

delete this


Grimey Drawer

Sten Freak posted:

If itís more than a few Iíd say start a thread. People love to see old guns and will help where they can.

Ceros_X posted:

The easiest thing for you to do would be to look at each firearm. On almost all modern production guns (from 1969 onward), you'll find markings the indicate the manufacturer, model, caliber (what type of round it shoots) etc. If you go through your firearms and snap a pic of each gun and then the information on the firearm we can help you out. We (or Google) can help find some manuals and other care instructions. I'd guess most of them are probably OK as is unless they're old muskets or something, pics will tell a lot. Some people put a piece of tape over the serial numbers when they put pictures of firearms on the internet (to keep search engine OCR from indexing it and associating it to their username/keep other people from reporting the gun as stolen) but other people don't care.

Also, look at how they are being stored - are they in a climate controlled environment - if in a damp or humid environment you could see some surface rust develop? Are they locked up (you said in a corner) - some states have storage requirements for firearms (like California) and some are conditional (kids in the house etc).

Javid posted:

make thread, link thread here, post detailed pics, and we will be happy to help you figure out that score.

It was recommended in the newbie thread that I start a new thread for this, so I have. Basically, I inherited a bunch of old (and newish) guns from my grandfather and they've just been sitting around collecting dust. I'd like to catalogue them, see what might be necessary in terms of restoration/maintenance/etc, sourcing ammunition, and so on in order to keep them in working condition. Some are in good condition, others have rusted somewhat.

With regards to gun laws, I live in Ohio at the moment. I've tried to get shots of all the markings, but since my phone camera is hosed they aren't super high quality, unfortunately. Any help is appreciated!

Shotgun 1
Rifle 1
Shotgun 2
Shotgun 3
Shotgun 4
Shotgun 5
Shotgun 6
Rifle 2
Shotgun 7
Rifle 3
Shotgun 8

E: fixed rifle 3 & shotgun 8 albums

Syenite fucked around with this message at 02:18 on Feb 2, 2020

Adbot
ADBOT LOVES YOU

Captain Log
Oct 2, 2006

Captain Log posted:

"I AINT DYING! Choo choo motherfucker!"




Do I see an Auto 5?!?!

Iíll let the smart posters contribute, but thatís pretty baller.

Comfy sponk
Mar 30, 2007



Captain Log posted:

Do I see an Auto 5?!?!

Iíll let the smart posters contribute, but thatís pretty baller.

Yes you do spy an FN Browning auto 5.

There's also a nice winchester model 70 in 300 win mag.

wheres my beer
Apr 29, 2004


Tryin' to catch me ridin' dirty


Fun Shoe

Welcome to TFR, and I'm sorry for your loss. Looks like your grandfather was a bit of a hunter, and had interesting taste in firearms.

Disclaimer: I am not a gunsmith nor do I play one on television. This is generalized advice and should not be taken as gospel or used as an official appraisal or valuation. Please don't sue me if you sell a million-dollar gun for $37 or shoot your face off. Also I ANAL.

QUICK START: I am unaware of your general level of firearms proficiency. Since you posted in the newbie thread I am going to assume it is fairly low. As such I would strongly encourage you to seek out local training through a hunters safety course, or an NRA orientation course. Guns are tools that can result in serious injury or death to the operator and/or bystanders if used improperly.

Rifle 1
Rifle one appears to be a Sporterized M1903 rifle. It's likely in .30-06 and though not a particularly valuable rifle, would likely be a great deer gun. We'll need some photos of the receiver to make sure it's not one of the cursed early ones that might have had a double heat-treated receiver.

Rifle 2
Rifle 2 is a Winchester Model 70 in .300 Win Mag. I'm not a Model 70 expert but if we could better photos of the bolt with some side lighting it'd help things out. I suspect it's a post-64 production rifle based on the provided images which means it's not quite as collectible (but again, a great gun) and would be an excellent choice for taking just about any animal in North America.

Rifle 3
Some flavor of 22LR semi auto! These are fun on a bun if you can get them to work, but be mindful these were made for 22LR Standard Velocity ammo, not high velocity stuff. Bulk packed ammo is usually high velocity and will feed like poo poo so be mindful of that.

Shotgun 1
Shotgun 1 appears to be a Newport Model CN. I know fuckall about these things but a quick google search revealed the following Shotgun World forum post:

Crown Grade posted:

Newport Model CN:"Trade Brand Name" shotgun made by Crescent Fire Arms Company of Norwich,CT (1892 to 1930) for and sold by Hibbard Spencer Bartlett of Chicago,IL, a large wholesale sporting goods dealer. Need to know the serial number of the gun and whether it is an outside hammer or hammerless type to answer ammunition question. but suspect that the gun is chambered for 2 1/2 and maybe 2 9/16 inch shells loaded with either black powder or low pressure smokeless powder and lead shot. The gun was not designed for modern 3 inch or magnum shells loaded with high pressure smokeless powder or steel shot. There are no off the shelf parts available as Crescent Fire Arms Company went out of business over eighty two years ago but parts and parts guns sometime show up on various gun auction sites. Value? Value will depend on the guns condition, the amount of original finish remaining on the metal and wood as well as the mechanical condition. A prime condition example (rare) that appears to have come out of the factory yesterday afternoon might bring as much as $125 (.410 bore slightly more) while a rusty metal, rotten wood and missing parts piece of junk fit only for parts salvage or as a pup tent pole might fetch as little as $10. Think you made a typo as I have no listing for a Model CM.

My takeaway from this post is until you have a good understanding on shotguns I would avoid feeding this shotgun anything resembling modern ammunition.

Shotgun 2
DOPE. This is a Winchester Model 1897. These are reasonably desirable as collectibles because they were one of the first pump-action shotguns. As far as pump guns go they're a bit complex, but also fun on a bun, although you'll need to do a bunch of reading to figure out what type of shotgun shells these could handle. Here's a handy resource you can use to figure out the age of your gun Winchester Dates of Manufacture 1897

Same story for Shotgun 3

Shotgun 4
Some kind of H&R style break action shotgun with what looks to be a wire wrap around the wrist of the stock to keep it together. Typically these aren't worth a ton, and I'd bet money this one isn't in good shape. If you could get us photos of markings it would help us figure out whats what.

Shotgun 5
Oh hey, a Remington 1100! There are lovely gas operateds semi automatic shot guns. They can be a little picky about loadings but are fun guns for trap, skeet, and converting ducks into dinner. Oldguns.net Date Code Lookup Table Thing

Shotgun 6
An Iver Johnson Champion Shotgun by the looks of the markings. Way outside of the scope of my knoweldge, but once again Shotgun World has a few words on the gun but it looks like a lot of knowledge has been lost to the sands of time. Iver Johnson wasn't exactly known for its high quality back in the day so I'd set this one to wall hanger duty.

Shotgun 7
As Captain Log pointed out, this appears to be some flavor of Browning Auto 5. These can be extremely valuable, or just kinda valuable depending on what model and year it was made. I personally have quite a bit of fondness for these shotguns because of their extremely interesting recoil curve and overall fun-ness. Yours appears to have an extremely early serial number which is super duper rad. Dating an Auto 5

Shotgun 8
It's a Remington Model 11! These are a licensed copy of the Browning Auto 5, and as such are super fun. When you see your gunsmith ask about the fiber cushion on this shotgun. It's absolutely a wear part, and running the gun with one of these in bad shape could result in permanent damage to the receiver. Replacements are available and aren't too expensive but the act of replacing them is kind of a pain in the butt since there is a rivet that needs to be drilled out and replaced at a weird angle. Yours appears to have an adjustable choke which is handy for murdering birds and such.

The dating guide for the Remington 1100 also works for this gun.

What to do with these old guns?
Well, let's start by cleaning them. Using a light oil and lint free rag think cut up old tshirt wipe all of the metal bits down and get the dust and crud off. If you have cleaning supplies it'd be a good chance to get some oil in the bores as well. If you have access to it, Howard's Feed-N-Wax is a decent product for getting a little oil into the wood and getting some of the surface grime off. DO NOT go hog wild scrubbing and/or sanding the stocks. Just get some of the grime off while you assess your next steps.

Great, now what?
I'd try to read up on each gun. Thanks to the wonders of the internet manuals exist for the more popular firearms. I went ahead and did some quick googling to get you started on the low hanging fruit:
Winchester Model 70 Manual
Browning Auto-5 Manuals
Some Rando's Guide on the 1897
Remington 1100 Manual
Field Manual for the M1903 Rifle - looks like your gun has lyman sights so this manual might be useful too

Once you've gotten a feel for your guns, their history, and their general care/operation and have gotten some basic familiarization training your next task is to figure out what you want. Do you want to get into large game hunting? How about sport clay shooting? Hell duck hunting is totally in the cards with the guns in your collection. Speaking of collections, perhaps this could be the start of a robust gun collection, or maybe this is just a hobby you come and visit every so often to share a connection with your grandfather. It's really up to you, and we'll be happy to help you get to where you want to be.

Cool Now You Have a Sense of Guns
Well, if you plan on shooting these guns, your next step will be to find a competent gunsmith. If you take a class, your instructors may have some recommendations for gunsmiths in your area, or maybe some OHIO TFR goon can help you find someone who can help you look over the guns and do some basic inspections like headspace. Since these guns are quite old, and your experience is rather limited, getting them looked at by a professional is the way to go.

If you can't find a gunsmith, hit a few local gun stores and ask around. Chances are, there's a few in your area that'll have a good understanding of the mechanics of these firearms and can help you determine if they're in good working order. For a fee of course.

wheres my beer fucked around with this message at 06:27 on Feb 2, 2020

Syenite
Jun 21, 2011

delete this


Grimey Drawer


I fixed the last two galleries, something went funky with them.

Thanks for the insight, and I do believe it goes without saying that I will be very careful about ammo if/when that happens.

Syenite fucked around with this message at 02:37 on Feb 2, 2020

Beardless
Aug 12, 2011

I am Centurion Titus Polonius. And the only trouble I've had is that nobody seem to realize that I'm their superior officer.


Rifle 3 looks like a Stevens or Springfield Model 87 or a Savage Model 6, which are different names for the same basic gun. Based on what the barrel says, it will fire any of .22 Short, .22 Long, or .22 Long Rifle. .22 LR will be the most readily available. DO NOT try to fire .22 Magnum out of this rifle, though I doubt it would even fit.

Edit:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oxwmSt6Pe54
I just skimmed this, but it looks like a good overview of the function and disassembly of the rifle.

Beardless fucked around with this message at 02:50 on Feb 2, 2020

wheres my beer
Apr 29, 2004


Tryin' to catch me ridin' dirty


Fun Shoe

Beardless posted:

Rifle 3 looks like a Stevens or Springfield Model 87 or a Savage Model 6, which are different names for the same basic gun. Based on what the barrel says, it will fire any of .22 Short, .22 Long, or .22 Long Rifle. .22 LR will be the most readily available. DO NOT try to fire .22 Magnum out of this rifle, though I doubt it would even fit.

Edit:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oxwmSt6Pe54
I just skimmed this, but it looks like a good overview of the function and disassembly of the rifle.

Yup sure looks like some 87 derivative to me. If you decide to shoot this, avoid feeding it mini mags or high-velocity ammunition. These older semi-autos were tuned for standard velocity 22LR ammunition. As far as 22 magnum, fortunately, the case wall is too thick to allow feeding into regular old 22LRs, and it's probably too long to get the round anywhere near the chamber.


Syenite posted:

I fixed the last two galleries, something went funky with them.

Thanks for the insight, and I do believe it goes without saying that I will be very careful about ammo if/when that happens.

Yup! That .300 WinMag is going to be a bit of a butt-kicker and ammo won't be particularly cheap. Also, I believe Ohio has some pretty strict hunting rules due to its flatness your Springfield and Mod 70 might not be good hunting guns for your location. my cousin takes an elk and a deer every year with his Springfield in Colorado tho

Shotgun 8
I'll update my original post, but this is a Remington Model 11.

wheres my beer fucked around with this message at 03:06 on Feb 2, 2020

Beardless
Aug 12, 2011

I am Centurion Titus Polonius. And the only trouble I've had is that nobody seem to realize that I'm their superior officer.


Miso Beno posted:

Yup sure looks like some 87 derivative to me. If you decide to shoot this, avoid feeding it mini mags or high-velocity ammunition. These older semi-autos were tuned for standard velocity 22LR ammunition. As far as 22 magnum, fortunately the case wall is too thick to allow feeding into older 22LRs, and it's probably too long to get the round anywhere near the chamber.

That's a good call.

wheres my beer
Apr 29, 2004


Tryin' to catch me ridin' dirty


Fun Shoe

Beardless posted:

That's a good call.

You're a good call.

Somebody Awful
Nov 27, 2011

BORN TO DIE
HAIG IS A FUCK
Kill Em All 1917
I am trench man
410,757,864,530 SHELLS FIRED




Miso Beno posted:

We'll need some photos of the receiver to make sure it's not one of the cursed early ones that might have had a double heat-treated receiver.

Over heat-treated, rather. Double treating was implemented to prevent that.

wheres my beer
Apr 29, 2004


Tryin' to catch me ridin' dirty


Fun Shoe

Somebody Awful posted:

Over heat-treated, rather. Double treating was implemented to prevent that.
Oh yeah, that makes more sense. Been a long time since I dug into 1903s.

fun reading on the topic

edit: OP what other questions do you have about these gats/laws/whatevs? You mentioned they were kinda sitting in the corner, do you have questions about storage?

wheres my beer fucked around with this message at 04:42 on Feb 2, 2020

Mambo No. 5
Feb 24, 2009

Admiral Parry "Terror" Sornis,
Dead Birds Society



Cool oldgats OP. Thanks for sharing!

TheNothingNew
Nov 10, 2008


Miso Beno posted:

You mentioned they were kinda sitting in the corner, do you have questions about storage?

This is where my head is going. Guns are a target for theft, quite aside from the potential loss of a reminder of your grandfather.
Get a safe and a humidity management system for the safe to help manage rust.
I skipped that on my inherited guns and they got more rust in a month in my safe than they had in 50 years sitting in the corner of my grandfather's tool shed. loving rust belt.

Also, thanks for sharing. Old guns are neat.

Itchy_Grundle
Feb 22, 2003



If youíre ok with posting the serial number of the Winchester Model 70 I can look up the year of manufacture.

Adbot
ADBOT LOVES YOU

Capn Beeb
Jun 29, 2003

Enter the woods, find a friend!


Note about the Winchester '97:

If the manufacture date is before 1930, the chamber is likely cut for old 2.5" shells, so shooting modern ammo might be a bit risky. Any decent gunsmith can measure and extend the forcing cone on a shotgun, though.

Edit:

I used this gauge to measure my '97's forcing cone:

https://www.brownells.com/gunsmith-tools-supplies/measuring-tools/shotgun-chamber-gauges/shotgun-chamber-gauge-prod593.aspx

Capn Beeb fucked around with this message at 21:37 on Feb 2, 2020

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • Post
  • Reply