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Yorkshire Pudding
Nov 24, 2006





Josef bugman posted:

This sounds very similar to what happened in the medieval era Europe where people gave vast amounts of land and money to monks until the monasteries became state actors in themselves and started having armies. Usually they also became somewhat corrupt (not in the way that Henry VII or the various different Whig Historians liked to make out ofc) and it meant that eventually people started giving more land/money to the poorer monastaries, thus creating the cycle again.

Each one begins from a place of utter poverty and eventually becomes a stupidly powerful and wealthy temporal society. Does that happen a lot in Buddhism as well?

This was also common in Japan from about the 10th-17th centuries. Some temples became very powerful financially, even having their own independent military. Warlords would sometimes try and buy them off or recruit them to fight their neighbors.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/S%C5%8Dhei

Also, please read about Benkei. A famous(ly ugly) gigantic warrior monk who reportedly died holding a bridge in the most badass way possible.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Benkei

Yorkshire Pudding fucked around with this message at 18:53 on Feb 17, 2020

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Yorkshire Pudding
Nov 24, 2006





Paramemetic posted:

I spent a lot of time in the last thread, in fact, defending the mental perspective on rebirth, and arguing that I don't really care if someone accepts literal rebirth or thinks it's a metaphor so long as they are practicing compassion.

Not trying to open a can of worms, but how could one not accept rebirth but still accept the dharma, samsara, and nirvana?

That feels a bit like saying ďI believe Christ is our Lord and Savior and he forgave of us of all ours Sins, but I donít actually believe in God or HeavenĒ?

I get that in the end youíre saying that as long as people are practicing compassion thatís a big net gain, but it seems odd to be able to pick apart one of the big foundations of impermanence.

Yorkshire Pudding
Nov 24, 2006





As someone who has meditated and identified as Buddhist for around 15 years, but never practiced in a sangha, how do I go about finding one? There's a few different temples and backgrounds in my area, but they all come from different backgrounds and sects.Given that I don't really know anything about the lineages or the differences among them, should I just go shop around and find one that I like?

Yorkshire Pudding
Nov 24, 2006





I'm in the Kansas City area, and there's a few around here I've looked at (but haven't visited).

https://www.rimecenter.org/ Seems to be sort of nondenominational but with general Tibetan focus.

http://www.templebuddhistcenter.com/ claims to be a "Western Buddhist Temple" which kind of puts me off a bit.

https://kansascitybuddhistcenter.wildapricot.org/ Kansas City Buddhist Center also seems to be a mix of backgrounds

https://kansaszencenter.org/ Looks to be the local Zen temple

Yorkshire Pudding
Nov 24, 2006





I will check it out then. Itís got some times that work well for me too.

Iíll report back in a few weeks.

Yorkshire Pudding
Nov 24, 2006





New question: I have really inflexible hips and knees, so even sitting basic cross-legged for me is hard. I basically have to be sitting against a wall or something, which tells me my posture isnít good.

I bought a meditation bench to sit seiza style, but my issue is that I can feel a lot of stress in my shoulders and neck from my hands having nowhere to sit. My lower back always feels fairly tense, but that may just be me getting used to sitting upright like this. And recommendations?

Yorkshire Pudding
Nov 24, 2006





Currently switching my priorities to attain just enough bad karma to be reborn as a Fire Eagle.

Yorkshire Pudding
Nov 24, 2006





I'm about finished with Zen Mind, Beginner's Mind and I am not thrilled with it. Most of my knowledge of Zen comes from works by Miyamoto Musashi, and I found these little snippets by Suzuki to be not all that interesting. The whole theme of "Don't try to hard, but your posture and breathing is super important, also everything is zen" didn't really land with me. I've never really had a specific transmission I've followed, but Suzuki has made me think Zen isn't my cup of tea.

My previous read was Thich Nhat Hanh's The Heart of the Buddha's Teachings, which I thought was an excellent overview of general Buddhist belief. I have The Book of Living and Dying next, which I started but never finished some time ago. I also ordered Walking an Uncommon Path as Paramemetic recommended, but it won't be here for a few weeks.

Thanks for listening to my book report.

Yorkshire Pudding
Nov 24, 2006





Hey thread, hope everyone is getting along okay.

Iíve been doing a lot more meditating lately, but one of my biggest problems is still my absolutely wretched hips and knees. Iím really tall and long limbed, and I have terrible flexibility in my lower half. I can barely sit cross legged for more than a few minutes without pain. I bought a zafu and a zabuton, and those have helped enough that I can basically sit for 20 minutes pain free if I have a wall to lean on.

Lately Iíve been doing yoga in the morning, mostly with a focus of improving my flexibility to improve my sitting posture. My eventual goal is to be able to sit lotus style. Let me once again stress how inflexible I am. I cannot even begin to get one foot on its opposite hip before things start straining, painfully.

Does anyone have a recommendation for a YouTube video or guide I could start doing daily to improve my flexibility for the specific purpose of better sitting posture?

Yorkshire Pudding
Nov 24, 2006





For the record when I talk about my goal being lotus position, Iím talking like ďit would be good if in 5 years I can sit comfortably on the lotus positionĒ. I get that itís not requisite for anything, I just want to start moving toward it gradually.

Yorkshire Pudding
Nov 24, 2006





Thanks for the excellent write up, Rodney! Iíll check out those resources.

for the near future I think Iíll stick with some basic yoga and just focus on getting some basic flexibility down. Iíve got plenty of time to work towards more advanced stuff.

Yorkshire Pudding
Nov 24, 2006





Qurantine Book Report: The Tibetan Book of Living and Dying.

I just finished this book after picking it up more than a year ago and bouncing off it the first time. While the sections that actually talked about practical advice for dying and helping people who are dying were quite good, the rest of it was a side of Buddhism I very much disliked.

Sogyal Rinpoche is a good writer, and it is obvious that he is learned, but if this is Tibetan Buddhism/Vajrayana I am very much not into it. Having just come off of The Heart of the Buddha's Teachings, which was great, this book felt like the Buddhist equivalent of a "Book of Witchcraft Spells". I've always practiced my Buddhism in what is I guess a very 'Western' style, in that I don't get too much into the cosmology or any that. So maybe that's why it's so jarring to see a renowned master spend pages talking about how your body will turn into a rainbow when you die if you practice enough, and how if you stick a needle in a recently deceased person then you might actually suck their "spirit" through the hole and then they can't depart through the top of the head and achieve enlightenment.

I'm also very, very wary of religion in general, and what initially drew me to Buddhism in my teens was the whole "if you meet the Buddha on the road, kill him" philosophy. So to see such a huge focus on "Ah you must have a Master from a verified lineage and this Master is even more important than the Buddha" is pretty discomforting. I understand the importance of having a teacher and a Sangha, but this style really feels more cultish with it's secret esoteric practices. Especially when you hear those practices just written down, it feels like that South Park episode where you learn that Scientologists believe that Xenu dropped souls out of a 747 into volcanos and that why people get sad.

I was actually looking forward to reading Walking an Uncommon Path, but I waited 5 weeks for it to be delivered before being told "sorry we must have forgot to deliver it", so that won't happen soon.

I've also had huge trouble meditating recently also, maybe because of everything that's going on. It's been about 10 days since I've had a session that I felt was good, and I can barely sit down for more than 5 minutes without thinking "Okay this isn't working I should quit".

Sorry for the overly negative post. Hope everyone else is doing okay out there.

Yorkshire Pudding
Nov 24, 2006





If SA goes down unexpectedly, it has been a pleasure sharing and learning of the Dharma with all of you.

Yorkshire Pudding
Nov 24, 2006





Nessus posted:

This is the link, as a skillful means to facilitate favorable posting rebirth.

Iím going to be posting from the hungry ghost realm

Yorkshire Pudding
Nov 24, 2006





Iíve found this book to be really helpful:



On a serious note, maybe there are some aspects of your life that arenít meshing well? If this is a consistent partner you could have a conversation about it, but if youíre with different people every night that may be an issue.

Yorkshire Pudding
Nov 24, 2006





SomethingAwful is a sacred place.

Yorkshire Pudding
Nov 24, 2006





Can someone relate to me the quote thatís something like ďif I had 1000 eyes to see the worlds pain and 1000 hands to helpĒ?

I need a mantra to remind me to not go out and do things that could spread a deadly pandemic when I see every person around me not giving a poo poo and am struggling to do what is right despite knowing itís not helping.

Yorkshire Pudding
Nov 24, 2006





A Typical Goon posted:

Has anyone is this thread read Siddhartha? Personally I loved it but Iím curious what people that are actual Buddhists think, particularly cause the novel seems to point towards a path of personal individual enlightenment as opposed to finding enlightenment through the noble eightfold path

Iíve read it, I remember enjoying it. Itís been a while, but the whole premise is that itís the path of the original Buddha, right? So the noble eightfold path had not been codified yet, and it would have ďcome toĒ Siddhartha after he reached enlightenment looking into the river.

Edit: I just had a funny memory. I read that in high school for an English class, and it was really serendipitous because we read it just a few months after I left Christianity (having been raised and confirmed as a Lutheran since birth) and had just taken my first steps on the Eightfold Path. I got really annoyed because after we read that all my friends were like ďooh are you Buddhist now because we read Siddhartha?Ē

Yorkshire Pudding fucked around with this message at 15:47 on Dec 7, 2020

Yorkshire Pudding
Nov 24, 2006





I tried to order ďWalking an Uncommon PathĒ before covid hit and it never showed up. Iíd still like to check it out. Local libraries donít have it either.

Anyone know of an online retailer that has it in stock?

Yorkshire Pudding
Nov 24, 2006





Youíre right, itís on Google Play. Thank you!

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Yorkshire Pudding
Nov 24, 2006





Girlfriend brought up an interesting question when she was asking about rebirth. She asked if she could be reborn in the past.

Do any Buddhist dialogues discuss the nature of time, and whether it is linear or something else. Is it just another composite thing?

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