Register a SA Forums Account here!
JOINING THE SA FORUMS WILL REMOVE THIS BIG AD, THE ANNOYING UNDERLINED ADS, AND STUPID INTERSTITIAL ADS!!!

You can: log in, read the tech support FAQ, or request your lost password. This dumb message (and those ads) will appear on every screen until you register! Get rid of this crap by registering your own SA Forums Account and joining roughly 150,000 Goons, for the one-time price of $9.95! We charge money because it costs us $3,400 per month for bandwidth bills alone, and since we don't believe in shoving popup ads to our registered users, we try to make the money back through forum registrations.
«13 »
  • Post
  • Reply
taqueso
Mar 8, 2004









Fun Shoe

Most good lights are designed to use a primary battery that does not have much self discharge, so the light will be ready to go even after a long sit. Rechargable batteries aren't good for that yet

Adbot
ADBOT LOVES YOU

Anonymous Robot
Jun 1, 2007

Lost his leg in Robo War I


My bad, I thought the TLR-2 was the compact version, not the laser one.

Internet Wizard
Aug 9, 2009

BANDAIDS DON'T FIX BULLET HOLES


Anonymous Robot posted:

My bad, I thought the TLR-2 was the compact version, not the laser one.

Was it the 6 you were thinking of?

I'd only recommend that one if it's a subcompact or smaller that can't fit the 1 HL, like a Glock 43 or similar.

MantisClaw
Jun 3, 2011


Nitrousoxide posted:

So 300 lumens should do the trick? I looks like that suggestion doesn't have a USB recharged battery, and I don't really want to be fussing around with tiny non-rechargeable batteries.

Speaking from personal experience, a 600+ lumen light in the face will absolutely disorient someone for a couple seconds which can be a deciding factor should lethal force be needed. I still have the scars from that force-on-force class. Controlling someone with light is also thing.

I'm not a fan on strobe settings personally, as they tend to be just as disorienting to the user and the recipient. A bright enough light can cause a similar effect but allow me to have full visual data of what's going on.

Nitrousoxide posted:

So 300 lumens should do the trick? I looks like that suggestion doesn't have a USB recharged battery, and I don't really want to be fussing around with tiny non-rechargeable batteries.

For the high end lights, you typically get an hour of use at max discharge. We might be seeing pistol lights using rechargable 18350/18650 lithium batteries in the near future but for right now a 12 pack of good CR123s typically lasts me a year for 3 WMLs and 2 handhelds. My handhelds get there batteries changed way more then the WML's ever will.

Proper Kerni ng
Nov 14, 2011



Your mileage may vary, but I had a guy come out from behind a building and start moving towards me in the dark, then stop outside of lunging range as soon as I reflexively put a 1000 lumen strobe in his face. He walked away in a huff after a brief and terse conversation, and two days later broke into a nearby house with a big-rear end knife and chased the occupants around until cops arrived.

poopgiggle
Feb 7, 2006

it isn't easy being a cross dominate shooter.

One of the pluses of ALL THE LUMENS that hasn't been brought up yet is the ability to light a room enough to identify stuff without pointing your muzzle directly at it.

Because you don't want to point your gun at something you haven't decided to shoot, and if you haven't positively ID'd something yet you hopefully haven't already decided to shoot it.

Trillhouse
Dec 31, 2000


Proper Kerni ng posted:

Your mileage may vary, but I had a guy come out from behind a building and start moving towards me in the dark, then stop outside of lunging range as soon as I reflexively put a 1000 lumen strobe in his face. He walked away in a huff after a brief and terse conversation, and two days later broke into a nearby house with a big-rear end knife and chased the occupants around until cops arrived.

Jesus loving Christ that's scary.

Proper Kerni ng
Nov 14, 2011



Guy was absolutely a stone cold psycho, too, and I'm pretty sure I'd have been in a knife fight in the dark if it weren't for that light-to-the-face reflex; about the only useful thing PTSD has ever done for me is cranking my situational awareness up to HYPERVIGILANCE!!! levels, so I'm usually extremely good at picking up the tells that indicate whether someone is a blowhard or a real threat or high or just confused, and this guy had me totally convinced he was just a wandering homeless dude who was indignant about getting a high beam in the eyes. Then he rolls back in a couple days later, jumping through a window and screaming about scalping some old people.

poopgiggle posted:

One of the pluses of ALL THE LUMENS that hasn't been brought up yet is the ability to light a room enough to identify stuff without pointing your muzzle directly at it.

Because you don't want to point your gun at something you haven't decided to shoot, and if you haven't positively ID'd something yet you hopefully haven't already decided to shoot it.
1000lm is no joke, even without the eyebleeder strobe I can't take that in the face in a dark for more than a few seconds myself without turning away from it, but what kind of beam a defensive light throws-- for both carried and weapon mounted-- is definitely a good thing to check out ahead of time; especially on a WML a beam that has a narrow tube of Accusing Finger Of God brightness surrounded by a cone of Bright Enough To Tell The Difference Between Family And Intruders is the best.

Ceros_X
Aug 6, 2006

U.S. Marine


Internet Wizard posted:

No definitely not the TLR-2

The TLR-1 HL is the entry-level light most recommended. Lasers are mostly worthless.


More lumen is always better, the TLR-1 HL has 1000 and can usually be found for just over $100. It's definitely the one to go with.

I don't know of any good lights that are USB rechargeable.

The TLR-1 HL is 800 lumens max unless something has changed recently (the Surefire X300U is the 1000 lumen light). Also the stock TLR-1 used to be the go to for the longest time...

John DiFool
Aug 27, 2013



I recently purchased a Walther PPQ M2 in 9mm with a threaded barrel. I was shooting it this weekend, and near the end of the session I noticed the barrel protector was working its way off. Now I can't seem to screw it all the way back on anymore. It only goes about 2/3rds of the way. I tried cleaning the barrel and the protector but the problem remains.

Any ideas on what I should do? Hopefully it's just the protector that's hosed up and not the barrel threads.

Also, should I keep the barrel protector on while shooting? If so, how do I keep it from working its way off again?

JRay88
Jan 4, 2013


Take it off and inspect the threads on both the protector and the barrel. It could be that thereís some build up in the threads stopping it from screwing all the way on. I usually take the thread protectors off unless Iím storing my guns.

Internet Wizard
Aug 9, 2009

BANDAIDS DON'T FIX BULLET HOLES


Ceros_X posted:

The TLR-1 HL is 800 lumens max unless something has changed recently (the Surefire X300U is the 1000 lumen light). Also the stock TLR-1 used to be the go to for the longest time...

I got the 1000 number from https://www.streamlight.com/en/prod.../index/tlr-1-hl

ThinkFear
Sep 14, 2007



Likely just upgraded the led module without changing skus.

Ceros_X
Aug 6, 2006

U.S. Marine


That's annoying, then. Even some sites selling it have it mixed up. Primary Arms lists it as 1k lumens but the specs say 800 lumens lol. https://www.primaryarms.com/streaml...ght-1000-lumens

Tyler Whitney
Jan 21, 2020

Why don't you make it sing?


The number for when the output was upgraded is fairly high up there; serial 260k and up iirc

edit:

"The TLR-1 HL began the 800 lumens with serial number 177980
The TLR-2 HL began the 800 lumens with serial number 029308"
Serial number 303112A and 684277 began the
1000 lumen lights being manufactured from 11/14/19

it's actually the second upgrade, the original TLR-1 ran at 630 lumens.

Tyler Whitney fucked around with this message at 06:31 on May 13, 2020

Ceros_X
Aug 6, 2006

U.S. Marine


Tyler Whitney posted:

The number for when the output was upgraded is fairly high up there; serial 260k and up iirc

edit:

"The TLR-1 HL began the 800 lumens with serial number 177980
The TLR-2 HL began the 800 lumens with serial number 029308"
Serial number 303112A and 684277 began the
1000 lumen lights being manufactured from 11/14/19

it's actually the second upgrade, the original TLR-1 ran at 630 lumens.

Good info, thanks

rump buttman
Feb 13, 2018
Probation
Can't post for 22 hours!


Question of curiosity. I have no gun to do this to. I was wondering if you mill serrations on a non serialized slide, can you mill through a manufactures mark? Like the Glock logo on a Glock slide? Is that explicitly illegal similar to tampering with serial numbers? Are manufacture marks on a serialized component (frame) as sacred as the serial number? Standard rear end gun, not nfa stuff.

my kinda ape
Sep 15, 2008

Everything's gonna be A-OK


Hair Elf

rump buttman posted:

Question of curiosity. I have no gun to do this to. I was wondering if you mill serrations on a non serialized slide, can you mill through a manufactures mark? Like the Glock logo on a Glock slide? Is that explicitly illegal similar to tampering with serial numbers? Are manufacture marks on a serialized component (frame) as sacred as the serial number? Standard rear end gun, not nfa stuff.

That's a good question that I don't actually know the answer to but I would guess that it's fine legally. Probably the only markings that matter are the ones on the receiver or whatever part is legally the firearm and not an accessory.

Craptacular
Jul 11, 2004



rump buttman posted:

Question of curiosity. I have no gun to do this to. I was wondering if you mill serrations on a non serialized slide, can you mill through a manufactures mark? Like the Glock logo on a Glock slide? Is that explicitly illegal similar to tampering with serial numbers?
No, it's not illegal. Remove/mutilate logos or rollmarks all you want.

rump buttman posted:

Are manufacture marks on a serialized component (frame) as sacred as the serial number? Standard rear end gun, not nfa stuff.
I don't know of any law that makes it illegal to do anything to the manufacturer's marks (e.g. "GLOCK INC, SMYRNA GA"). If there was, it would probably be here:

18 USC 922 posted:

(k) It shall be unlawful for any person knowingly to transport, ship, or receive, in interstate or foreign commerce, any firearm which has had the importerís or manufacturerís serial number removed, obliterated, or altered or to possess or receive any firearm which has had the importerís or manufacturerís serial number removed, obliterated, or altered and has, at any time, been shipped or transported in interstate or foreign commerce.
But that law only references the serial number, so AFAIK it's OK.

Craptacular fucked around with this message at 02:21 on May 17, 2020

Android Apocalypse
Apr 28, 2009

The future is
AUTOMATED
and you are
OBSOLETE





Illegal Hen

Milling the slide's manufacturer's mark is okay, and some places can give you the option to leave the marks there if you want.

Nitrousoxide
May 30, 2011

do not buy a oneplus phone




Are single/double-action auto loaders safer to use than striker fired pistols? I've been looking at some of the former and they seem to have a harder initial trigger pull and safeties that would seem to make them less risky to holster than a striker pistol.

MantisClaw
Jun 3, 2011


If we really wanted to split hairs, I would argue yes. All things being equal a 12 lbs DA trigger is harder to accidentally move then a 6 lbs striker. That being said most strikers have mechanisms as such the Glock trigger safeties that will act to help prevent a negligent discharge.

ND'ing while reholstering is a problem solved by being deliberate rather then changing equipment. For most of TFR, there no reason to holster at speed. Reholstering should be a controlled process where you look the gun into the holster.

A consistent theme I'm noticing in your posts is that you are looking for equipment solutions to training problems. That is a VERY expensive way to go about this hobby and I would strongly recommend getting some formal training, if possible in your area.

Craptacular
Jul 11, 2004



MantisClaw posted:

That being said most strikers have mechanisms as such the Glock trigger safeties that will act to help prevent a negligent discharge.
The Glock trigger safety is not there to prevent an ND due to someone or something pulling on the edge of the trigger but not in the center of the trigger. It's just a drop safety. That's all.

Nitrousoxide
May 30, 2011

do not buy a oneplus phone




MantisClaw posted:

If we really wanted to split hairs, I would argue yes. All things being equal a 12 lbs DA trigger is harder to accidentally move then a 6 lbs striker. That being said most strikers have mechanisms as such the Glock trigger safeties that will act to help prevent a negligent discharge.

ND'ing while reholstering is a problem solved by being deliberate rather then changing equipment. For most of TFR, there no reason to holster at speed. Reholstering should be a controlled process where you look the gun into the holster.

A consistent theme I'm noticing in your posts is that you are looking for equipment solutions to training problems. That is a VERY expensive way to go about this hobby and I would strongly recommend getting some formal training, if possible in your area.

I'd imagine I'm orders of magnitude more likely to hurt myself with a negligent discharge then to protect myself in a self defense situation, even if I just use it at the range and keep it locked up at home. So I'm pretty concerned with reducing that risk.

Loan Dusty Road
Feb 27, 2007


Nitrousoxide posted:

I'd imagine I'm orders of magnitude more likely to hurt myself with a negligent discharge then to protect myself in a self defense situation, even if I just use it at the range and keep it locked up at home. So I'm pretty concerned with reducing that risk.

Ya, you need to go get some training. And thatís a good thing. Most posters here have taken some form of live firearms trainings and it will make you feel soooo much more comfortable. Just make sure you find a good instructor.

stealie72
Jan 10, 2007

Their eyes locked and suddenly there was the sound of breaking glass.


All things being equal, a heavier trigger is more difficult to use and as pointed out, is an equipment solution to bad training/practice.

The NYPD got overly heavy trigger springs custom installed on their glocks because their officers were apparently not trained to keep their finger off the trigger. They had learned to depend on being able to put some pressure on the trigger of DA revolvers without firing the gun, which is a terrible practice, and they decided to depend on technology instead of doing things right once they were issued glocks.

I dont say this to be harsh, but learn to keep your finger off the trigger, and learn to obey the 4 rules to the point that they are psychologically painful to break or don't buy a gun.

Your thought process is logical for someone that doesn't know firearms well, but please trust us that it's not a good one in reality.

Parts Kit
Jun 9, 2006

durr
i have a hole in my head
durr


For a long time I was worried about Glocks not having a manual safety, so to prove to myself it wouldn't just go off while holstered I kept my G17 unloaded, cocked, and holstered on my person while I was at home for a few days. Never went click, and I felt much much better.

You might want to steer away from the Walther PPQ, while it's a great gun it has an absurdly light trigger even for a striker gun.

Also agreeing that you should get some training, it'll help a ton.

MantisClaw
Jun 3, 2011


Nitrousoxide posted:

I'd imagine I'm orders of magnitude more likely to hurt myself with a negligent discharge then to protect myself in a self defense situation, even if I just use it at the range and keep it locked up at home. So I'm pretty concerned with reducing that risk.

Which is why I suggested training. A solid fundementals based course that incorporates holster work will absolutely cover administrative functions such as proper drawing and reholstering. Not all training is High Speed - Low Drag 'Stop the Threat' focused, though that is what sells.

I understand that you are concerned about that risk and that's a good thing. It means that you're thinking about potential consequences. I am merely suggesting that building a strong foundation through proper instruction then using that knowledge base to allow you to make informed decisions will be easier and cheaper in the long run. Internet arguments are not a replacement for understanding context through experience.

tarlibone
Aug 1, 2014


Am I a... bad person?
AM I??


Fun Shoe

stealie72 posted:

The NYPD got overly heavy trigger springs custom installed on their glocks because their officers were apparently not trained to keep their finger off the trigger.

... ... ...

No. No no no. It's too easy. The comments and jokes are just too easy. I will not take the bait.

Nitrousoxide
May 30, 2011

do not buy a oneplus phone




I definitely plan on taking proper training when I can. My state is still locked down and will be for probably a month or two (Philly area of Penn).

Captain Log
Oct 2, 2006

Captain Log posted:

"I AINT DYING! Choo choo motherfucker!"



Fun Shoe

A lot of us who carry don't use firearms with manual safeties. I've carried coming up on fifteen years and refuse to use a defensive firearm with a manual safety.

That's just me. There are a lot of people here who are more experienced than me in all aspects. But a lot of people safely carry guns without manual safeties. The big take away is NEVER PUT YOUR FINGER IN THE TRIGGER if you don't plan on pulling it.

Other posters have better explained things than I will, but I wanted to point out a lot of defense CCW pistol people actively avoid manual safeties. The reason being that in a defensive shooting dicking with a safety isn't something you want to mess with, especially when half a second could be the difference between living and dying.

(I've never ND'ed a pistol for what it's worth)

my kinda ape
Sep 15, 2008

Everything's gonna be A-OK


Hair Elf

Captain Log posted:

A lot of us who carry don't use firearms with manual safeties. I've carried coming up on fifteen years and refuse to use a defensive firearm with a manual safety.

That's just me. There are a lot of people here who are more experienced than me in all aspects. But a lot of people safely carry guns without manual safeties. The big take away is NEVER PUT YOUR FINGER IN THE TRIGGER if you don't plan on pulling it.

Other posters have better explained things than I will, but I wanted to point out a lot of defense CCW pistol people actively avoid manual safeties. The reason being that in a defensive shooting dicking with a safety isn't something you want to mess with, especially when half a second could be the difference between living and dying.

(I've never ND'ed a pistol for what it's worth)

I am extremely embarrassed to report that I had my first ND a couple weeks ago. I was trying to get my 22lr High Standard Victor working right and it was being really finicky about chambering rounds (no feed ramp so you have to make the feed lips perfect for the ammo). I chambered a round and it didn't quite go into battery so I pointed it downwards and pushed the back of the slide closed with my left hand. I'm not entirely sure what happened but I think my finger must have touched the trigger which is adjusted to be as light as possible and it went off into the ground in front of my shooting bench as I pushed the slide forward to close it fully on the half chambered round. Scared the poo poo out of me.

That's about as low stakes as you can get with an ND aside from accidentally pulling the trigger while you're aiming downrange but the point is A) it could happen to YOU and B) *always* be pointing the gun in a safe direction if you're handling it while it's loaded.

W. D. Basterd
Jul 11, 2016


What's the best gun for shooting horses? My brother keeps getting his horses injured and is too afraid to "Do the deed"

Captain Log
Oct 2, 2006

Captain Log posted:

"I AINT DYING! Choo choo motherfucker!"



Fun Shoe

my kinda ape posted:

I am extremely embarrassed to report that I had my first ND a couple weeks ago. I was trying to get my 22lr High Standard Victor working right and it was being really finicky about chambering rounds (no feed ramp so you have to make the feed lips perfect for the ammo). I chambered a round and it didn't quite go into battery so I pointed it downwards and pushed the back of the slide closed with my left hand. I'm not entirely sure what happened but I think my finger must have touched the trigger which is adjusted to be as light as possible and it went off into the ground in front of my shooting bench as I pushed the slide forward to close it fully on the half chambered round. Scared the poo poo out of me.

That's about as low stakes as you can get with an ND aside from accidentally pulling the trigger while you're aiming downrange but the point is A) it could happen to YOU and B) *always* be pointing the gun in a safe direction if you're handling it while it's loaded.

Don't get me wrong, NDs can happen. My point is just it's pretty much always pulling the trigger, which shouldn't be happening regardless of your safety situation. Mantis already said everything better than I will about it.

Just for the record, I've NDed a rifle before and it was seriously one of the scariest things I've been through. My error? Pulled the trigger.

Cyrano4747
Sep 25, 2006



W. D. Basterd posted:

What's the best gun for shooting horses? My brother keeps getting his horses injured and is too afraid to "Do the deed"

Pretty much anything will do the job if you are able to get at touching distance and place it properly.

Have you or your brother ever euthanized an animal before? Because there's more to it than just putting bullets in until the kicking stops.

If you don't know how to humanely euthanize an animal as large as a horse you should really, really contact a vet or at the very least a nearby farmer who knows what they're doing in that regard.

Atticus_1354
Dec 9, 2006

Don't you go near that dog, you understand? Don't go near him, he's just as dangerous dead as alive.


W. D. Basterd posted:

What's the best gun for shooting horses? My brother keeps getting his horses injured and is too afraid to "Do the deed"

As someone who has had to euthanize a horse with a gun the horse was under vet care and that was the humane option my suggestion is to shoot your idiot brother who apparently keeps getting horses injured so often he needs a special gun for it. What the gently caress is he doing and why are you cool with him being such a piece of poo poo?

Ceros_X
Aug 6, 2006

U.S. Marine


Nitrousoxide posted:

I'd imagine I'm orders of magnitude more likely to hurt myself with a negligent discharge then to protect myself in a self defense situation, even if I just use it at the range and keep it locked up at home. So I'm pretty concerned with reducing that risk.

When I wanted to get my first gun I was obsessed with having a gun with a grip safety and a manual safety because I thought a gun having a safety made it, well, safer.

People on this forum made me realize that a manual safety was a crutch. You treat every gun as if it was loaded, period. Doesn't matter if it has 5 safeties, a 34lb trigger, etc.

So what's the problem with safeties? Safeties can lessen your sense of danger around a firearm. "This firearm isn't as dangerous because the safety is on!" (Or the trigger pull is heavier etc). Until the safety accidentally gets pushed off in the holster (like my Beretta M9). You can't depend on mechanical things to replace mindset.

I would never recommend a super heavy trigger as a safety measure - please do some googling on "ny trigger glock why it is bad" - almost every opinion out there is that it was a universal bad decision made by bureaucrats to try and fix through 'gear' what should have been fixed by training and more range time.

Why is a DA/SA bad (with a heavy first trigger pull and lighter follow up shots)? Because you now have to get used to two trigger pull weights. So instead of getting used to the same pull weight all the time the first one takes forever and the second one surprises you with how light it is.. the military moved away from the M9 and now it's using a striker fired polymer pistol.

If you're worried about NDing, don't do any trigger upgrades until you are comfortable with your weapon and have gotten to take a firearms training course (not high speed low drag, just basics). Spend a lot of time dry firing so you get comfortable with exactly how much force the trigger takes to break (which is also free and will improve your shooting). If you don't care about self defense then store your gun holstered (with a trigger that covers the trigger guard) and the ammo away from the gun. Load your gun at the range pointing down range etc. If you are going to conceal carry you can carry the gun unloaded until you are comfortable that you won't accidentally pull the trigger. Put the firearm on your body while it is holstered - a lot of accidental discharges occur when someone goes to holster it and some clothing gets caught in the trigger guard area and bunches up. So skip it and take more time. Buy a quality kydex holster and not some cheap leather/cloth holster (this keeps the trigger guard area from deforming and being able to actuate the trigger). All of this wall of words is how you reduce the risk of negligent discharge, not a heavier trigger pull.

my kinda ape
Sep 15, 2008

Everything's gonna be A-OK


Hair Elf

Captain Log posted:

Don't get me wrong, NDs can happen. My point is just it's pretty much always pulling the trigger, which shouldn't be happening regardless of your safety situation. Mantis already said everything better than I will about it.

Just for the record, I've NDed a rifle before and it was seriously one of the scariest things I've been through. My error? Pulled the trigger.

Yeah sorry wasn't really disagreeing with you or anything, just saw the topic come up and figured I should share my experience with the newbie thread as a teaching moment

I tend to fall on the "a safety is good to have" side of the argument but this gun had a manual safety and I still ND'd it because I was experiencing kind of a weird situation and that caused me to be slightly negligent.

my kinda ape fucked around with this message at 02:17 on May 18, 2020

Proper Kerni ng
Nov 14, 2011



My great grandfather would dispatch steers for slaughter by popping them in the forehead with a .22 Short revolver at contact distance, but he had decades of experience as a rancher and butcher and knew exactly where to put the popgun; one of my idiot cousins tried shooting a snakebit heifer in the forehead with a .44mag Super Blackhawk and had to chase the poor thing around the corral and shoot it three more times before it took. If I was going to dispatch doomed livestock I'd go for a 12ga guillotine, put a slug or buckshot where the spine meets the skull. Also make sure you either lead it to a burn pit first or have a winch or front end loader to put the carcass on a trailer after, that much dead weight ain't movin' without mechanical advantage.

Closest thing to an ND I've ever had was an actual legit accidental discharge; I put a round in the chamber of a Marlin 39A and was lowering the hammer to half-cock when the thumb extension on the hammer popped off and dropped it hard enough to fire. I may be an idiot but I've had the Four Rules engraved on my hindbrain since I was tiny, so the only thing that ate a bullet was the dirt about five feet in front of me.

Adbot
ADBOT LOVES YOU

poeticoddity
Jan 14, 2007
"How nice - to feel nothing and still get full credit for being alive." - Kurt Vonnegut Jr. - Slaughterhouse Five

W. D. Basterd posted:

What's the best gun for shooting horses? My brother keeps getting his horses injured and is too afraid to "Do the deed"

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2zi4FXCSgDw

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • Post
  • Reply
«13 »