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Ceros_X
Aug 6, 2006

U.S. Marine


Could also just get a decent door lock and turn a closet into a security container. Take it off when you move out etc. Someone can still break down the door or whatever but probably better than a bike lock tbh.

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Android Apocalypse
Apr 28, 2009

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Illegal Hen

Ceros_X posted:

Could also just get a decent door lock and turn a closet into a security container. Take it off when you move out etc. Someone can still break down the door or whatever but probably better than a bike lock tbh.

That's what I did with my master bedroom walk-in closet.

Captain Log
Oct 2, 2006

Captain Log posted:

"I AINT DYING! Choo choo motherfucker!"




I think the big question is who are you trying to deter? Drunk room mates? Kids? Or actual thieves?

Dip Viscous
Sep 17, 2019



Android Apocalypse posted:

IMO a better solution would be getting a case and locking that to a permanent fixture in your house.

For a while, I used a lockable hard case lag screwed to the floor of a closet.

Also, pull the bolts out of the rifles and store them separately in a small safe alongside your pistol(s). Preferably not one of the quick access ones that can be popped open with a spoon.

Edit: if you use cable locks as some part of what you do, do it like so to prevent the bolt from being inserted.

Dip Viscous fucked around with this message at 23:48 on May 3, 2021

Collateral Damage
Jun 13, 2009



Are there any gun locks that can't be picked open in five seconds using a paperclip?

Yes I've been watching LPL, why do you ask?

my kinda ape
Sep 15, 2008

Everything's gonna be A-OK


Oven Wrangler

I think it's also important to remember that your average thief is more often a guy high on meth and less often a guy famous for his lock picking skill who is equipped with a wide variety of lock picking tools.

On the other hand the tweaker might bring a huge bolt cutter or a hacksaw with him.

But yeah what Captain Log said is the most important question. What are you trying to stop? A young child? A troubled teen? Smash and grab? Gang of professional thieves?

Ironhead
Jan 19, 2005
Ironhead. Mmm.

I really feel like it comes down to what you are trying to prevent. I probably have some unpopular opinions ITT. I bought, what I feel, is a pretty decent safe from gunsafesnow.com it's a 2 hour rated fire safe with a removable keypad with a foot long backup key that I keep stashed. It was on sale for around $400 shipped. It was freight shipping and they literally dropped a pallet in my driveway and it was my problem to deal with. In my rental house I left it loose since it was so freaking heavy. In my house I just bought it is fixed. But I also have various antique firearms hanging on my walls (sans firing pins). There are never children in my house, my old lady knows how to use every fire arm I own, and I keep the important things secured.

Ironhead fucked around with this message at 02:04 on May 4, 2021

human garbage bag
Jan 8, 2020



I live in a low crime area so I guess I just don't want someone to break-in and easily walk off with my guns.

human garbage bag
Jan 8, 2020



Is it a good idea to buy items from a gun store even if it would be cheaper to buy online in order to get in the good graces of the store?

tarlibone
Aug 1, 2014

Am I a... bad person?
AM I??





Fun Shoe

human garbage bag posted:

Is it a good idea to buy items from a gun store even if it would be cheaper to buy online in order to get in the good graces of the store?

I try to buy from the store when I can. It's nice to support the local stores. However, if you order online, if it's a gun, there will be a transfer fee. The store keeps that, I believe. And, the store where I do most of my business doesn't mind if I shop online and get it delivered there. They totally understand, and the profit margins on Firearms are pretty slim anyway.

But, when it comes to accessories, magazines, or anything like that, I do try to buy in person if I can. Their margins on those are much larger. At least, I think they are.

I have spent a little extra to buy at my local shop, but I can afford to. I only buy online if I can't get it in a store in a reasonable amount of time.

stealie72
Jan 10, 2007

Their eyes locked and suddenly there was the sound of breaking glass.


tarlibone posted:

I try to buy from the store when I can. It's nice to support the local stores. However, if you order online, if it's a gun, there will be a transfer fee. The store keeps that, I believe. And, the store where I do most of my business doesn't mind if I shop online and get it delivered there. They totally understand, and the profit margins on Firearms are pretty slim anyway.

But, when it comes to accessories, magazines, or anything like that, I do try to buy in person if I can. Their margins on those are much larger. At least, I think they are.

I have spent a little extra to buy at my local shop, but I can afford to. I only buy online if I can't get it in a store in a reasonable amount of time.
This is a good answer.

Some FFLs are pricks and give you poo poo about buying something online and getting it sent to them. Try to avoid giving those guys business. But if you find good ones, by all means give them business.

I've got two not-lovely gun sellers near me: A relatively high volume pawn shop, and a small store that is a side gig for a ski shop owner to make money in the summer (but I can't get the guy to sponsor a biathlon, go figure). The pawn shop doesn't deal in new stuff, but is more. . . professional and I know they'll be there when they're supposed to be, so I prefer using them for my transfers from gunbroker. But if I'm looking for something new, I'll hit up the ski shop gun store on FB messenger and see if he can order it for me first. He'll straight up tell me if he can get it cheap enough to make it worth our while, or if it will be cheaper for me to get it from somewhere else and just pay the transfer. I go with whatever has the lower total cost, and he either gets a profit margin or $25 for a transfer.

So basically, if you find a place you like, give them a chance to get your business first.

Cyrano4747
Sep 25, 2006



It also all depends on how much of a relationship you feel like you want to cultivate. If you're a frequent customer and they know who you are and what you're interested in then they'll know to keep an eye out for you. Lots of people who are deep into collecting have a store that they frequent because the owner has contacts that they might not, and can bring interesting stuff to their attention. If you're way into enfields having a guy who buys a lot of estates know you as the enfield nut comes in handy when one passes through his hands.

On the other hand if you're the sort of shooter who is going to buy one rifle, maybe a handgun, go to the range a few times a year, and generally buy the odd accessory now and again? gently caress it, you're not going to bring them enough business for them to remember who you are.

human garbage bag
Jan 8, 2020



Thanks for the input. On a similar note, is it a good idea to tuck in my shirt when going to a gun store, to show that I'm not concealing a gun?

Anonymous Robot
Jun 1, 2007

Lost his leg in Robo War I


human garbage bag posted:

Thanks for the input. On a similar note, is it a good idea to tuck in my shirt when going to a gun store, to show that I'm not concealing a gun?

Nah, nobody will care about this. It varies a little by location, probably, but most gun store clerks probably assume you’re carrying a gun.

stealie72
Jan 10, 2007

Their eyes locked and suddenly there was the sound of breaking glass.


Also, most gun store clerks are also carrying a gun.

Poldarn
Feb 18, 2011



Bench rest bags, and also bench rest tips. Any brands or features to look for, or just get whatever off of amazon? A very kind fellow at the range let me use his and then I left before asking him anything about them.

Dip Viscous
Sep 17, 2019



human garbage bag posted:

Thanks for the input. On a similar note, is it a good idea to tuck in my shirt when going to a gun store, to show that I'm not concealing a gun?

Lots of people with tucked in shirts have guns. A gun store is the last place anyone will care as long as you aren't acting like a goofball.

Captain Log
Oct 2, 2006

Captain Log posted:

"I AINT DYING! Choo choo motherfucker!"




human garbage bag posted:

Thanks for the input. On a similar note, is it a good idea to tuck in my shirt when going to a gun store, to show that I'm not concealing a gun?

I'd say this, which would also apply to shopping in a high end antique shop or the like. You don't have to put on a suit of collared shirt. But people will treat you with more respect if you aren't too scruffy. Don't worry about dressing to the nines, but put on more than an A-strap undershirt and swimming trunks.

Dip Viscous
Sep 17, 2019



Sorry if that sounded kind of short, that's not what I meant and I'm just a person that tucks their shirt in.

Ceros_X
Aug 6, 2006

U.S. Marine


human garbage bag posted:

Is it a good idea to buy items from a gun store even if it would be cheaper to buy online in order to get in the good graces of the store?

I always like to give a store an opportunity to find a gun cheaper for me before I transfer it through them - "Hey I'm looking at getting this posurb Glock 22 for $250, are you able to get on for the same price or cheaper?"

Nope. Never happened. They check their wholesaler and then tell me whatever price is good etc. I gave them a shot. I'll usually try and pick up a box of ammo or some random accessory when I transfer the gun (if they make transfers easy by giving me a copy of their FFL cert to email to companies or whatever) but if not oh well.

Places that don't want you to transfer through them will charge like $50-75 for transfers (in non-California states) and have a list of online stores they won't transfer guns for (Buds, CheaperThanDirt, etc). Other places are happy to take your transfer business for $15-25 because they make money for running a background check and you might buy some poo poo from them while you're there filling out the paperwork.

Bottom line, don't feel obligated to do poo poo, feel free to grab a mag or some ammo if you feel guilty if they aren't poo poo bags.

Anonymous Robot
Jun 1, 2007

Lost his leg in Robo War I


I’ve been pulled over by a cop in my own neighborhood for no reason who started grilling me, being quite aggressive and hostile. When he asked for my ID I informed him that I had a handgun at my waist, and that I would produce a license for that as well.

He instantly warmed to me and sent me on my way without any further hassle.

The lesson here isn’t to inform cops of your weapon. He could’ve been like Log’s experience. On the other hand, he could’ve vaporized me if he caught a glimpse of my pistol grip.

It’s that cops are arbitrary and extremely dangerous, and there isn’t a good solution to interacting peaceably with them. In the future, I’ll probably keep my license and weapon to my drat self.

Dip Viscous
Sep 17, 2019



I always at least attempt to buy a related item if I do a transfer at a shop. A simple "Do you have a holster that would fit this?" goes a long way even if they don't have something for you.

Anonymous Robot posted:

I’ve been pulled over by a cop in my own neighborhood for no reason who started grilling me, being quite aggressive and hostile. When he asked for my ID I informed him that I had a handgun at my waist, and that I would produce a license for that as well.

I'm a non-white that gets pulled over for zero reason once every 2-3 weeks and it's loving wild how fast the demeanor of cops changes when I hand over my weapons permit behind my driver's license. The shift from "I will blow your head off with no provocation." to "Whatever, you're cool." happens instantly. It's so pronounced that friends of mine that have no interest in ever being armed have gotten permits.

human garbage bag
Jan 8, 2020



Glock came in. Is it supposed to be possible to close the slide without using the slide release with an empty mag loaded and no round in the chamber by pulling the slide back and releasing it? Also is it supposed to be very hard to load the last round in the mag? I'm a grown rear end man and barely managed to get it in using the auto-loader, I can't imagine how a 90 pound grandma would be able to do it.

my kinda ape
Sep 15, 2008

Everything's gonna be A-OK


Oven Wrangler

human garbage bag posted:

Glock came in. Is it supposed to be possible to close the slide without using the slide release with an empty mag loaded and no round in the chamber by pulling the slide back and releasing it? Also is it supposed to be very hard to load the last round in the mag? I'm a grown rear end man and barely managed to get it in using the auto-loader, I can't imagine how a 90 pound grandma would be able to do it.

I'm not familiar with glocks and it depends on the gun design weather or not you can close on an empty mag like that but that's typically how you'd be able to close it on any gun with a loaded mag. Most guns you can close it that way on an empty mag too.

Yeah most magazines it's much more difficult to fit that last round or two in. Your magazine might have a bit of a break in period where it becomes easier after you load it a few times. You can either let his happen naturally or you can use something to depress the spring all the way like a dozen times if you're impatient.

Anonymous Robot
Jun 1, 2007

Lost his leg in Robo War I


Here’s a trick it took me far too long to learn: insert your cartridge into the magazine primer-side down, then once the spring is compressed, turn it parallel to the rest of the rounds. In other words, put it in “straight down” and turn it 90 degrees once it’s “in”. Much easier way to load cartridges.

human garbage bag
Jan 8, 2020



Should I just get a backpack to store all the extra stuff I need when going to the range? (eye protection, ear protection, ammo, binoculars, targets, etc.)

my kinda ape
Sep 15, 2008

Everything's gonna be A-OK


Oven Wrangler

human garbage bag posted:

Should I just get a backpack to store all the extra stuff I need when going to the range? (eye protection, ear protection, ammo, binoculars, targets, etc.)

Yeah most people have a "range bag" that they keep all their gun stuff in that they typically need at the range. You can just throw it all in a backpack or gym bag or you can get purpose made range bags.

I use one of these and it's really nice for the price: https://lapolicegear.com/jumbo-bailout-bag.html

They make smaller versions too or there's lots of other companies that make similar stuff.

human garbage bag
Jan 8, 2020



Should you get a few hollow point 9mm rounds if you want to use a handgun for self defense?

Somebody Awful
Nov 27, 2011

BORN TO DIE
HAIG IS A FUCK
Kill Em All 1917
I am trench man
410,757,864,530 SHELLS FIRED




No. You get a bunch of hollowpoint rounds, from a brand known to be of good quality, and practice thoroughly to ensure that (a) your gun runs reliably with them and (b) you can shoot for poo poo should you actually find yourself in a lethal force situation.

pipebomb
May 12, 2001

Dear God, what is it like in your funny little brains?
It must be so boring.


human garbage bag posted:

Also is it supposed to be very hard to load the last round in the mag? I'm a grown rear end man and barely managed to get it in using the auto-loader, I can't imagine how a 90 pound grandma would be able to do it.

One word: Maglula

I have one in my safe, one in my car and another in my range case. I have a bit of arthritis and these are Gods greatest gift to humanity.

L0cke17
Nov 29, 2013



pipebomb posted:

One word: Maglula

I have one in my safe, one in my car and another in my range case. I have a bit of arthritis and these are Gods greatest gift to humanity.

If you only own Glocks or have a lot of Glock mags this is the loving best thing ever:
https://www.speedbeez.com/product/glock-9mm-magazine-loader-lever-loader/

tarlibone
Aug 1, 2014

Am I a... bad person?
AM I??





Fun Shoe

human garbage bag posted:

Should I just get a backpack to store all the extra stuff I need when going to the range? (eye protection, ear protection, ammo, binoculars, targets, etc.)

This is the one I use, and it's probably in-stock at a Walled Mart near you. It can easily handle several handguns, more magazines than you'll probably bring, some tools, a notebook, masking tape, writing utensils, ear pro, eye pro, hand pro, etc. It is very durable for the price, too.



pipebomb posted:

One word: Maglula

I have one in my safe, one in my car and another in my range case. I have a bit of arthritis and these are Gods greatest gift to humanity.

Yes, get the UpLULA. It is amazing. Mrs. T. uses one when she goes to the range, especially if her RA is flaring up.

human garbage bag
Jan 8, 2020



Somebody Awful posted:

No. You get a bunch of hollowpoint rounds, from a brand known to be of good quality, and practice thoroughly to ensure that (a) your gun runs reliably with them and (b) you can shoot for poo poo should you actually find yourself in a lethal force situation.

Is it really necessary to train with the hollow points though? They are a bit more expensive than the round ones. I figured I could just keep a small box of hollow points at home, and go to the range with the cheap ones.

tarlibone
Aug 1, 2014

Am I a... bad person?
AM I??





Fun Shoe

human garbage bag posted:

Is it really necessary to train with the hollow points though? They are a bit more expensive than the round ones. I figured I could just keep a small box of hollow points at home, and go to the range with the cheap ones.

If you have the means, you should at least occasionally practice with them. To give some context, when I'm starting a shooting session by shooting handloaded wadcutters at a target five yards away in single action, if I then switch to one of my Skinny Cowboys (a lightly loaded, 357 magnum, 158 grain round nose lead bullet), it may hit in a slightly different place. Now, the difference isn't usually very much at handgun self defense distances, which are around 5 - 10 yards. But, I'm talking about revolvers, which will "cycle" just fine as long as the rounds fit in the cylinder and don't stick out the front of it.

But, for a semi, some hollow points may not cycle reliably. They'll fire just fine if you can chamber a round, but that next round may not chamber. This is why, at a bare minimum, you need to run a couple magazines of your selected self defense ammo, just to make sure your gun will work with it. Generally speaking, with modern handguns and typical self defense ammo, you probably won't have a problem. But, a situation where your life depends on your gun working properly is not the best time to see if those particular hollow points are going to work well in your gun.

Android Apocalypse
Apr 28, 2009

The future is
AUTOMATED
and you are
OBSOLETE






Illegal Hen

In an ideal world you vet your carry ammo with your firearm by running a couple boxes through it. Then when you figure out what works reliably, you get the same brand & weight ammo in FMJ to save .

poopgiggle
Feb 7, 2006

it isn't easy being a cross dominate shooter.




human garbage bag posted:

Is it really necessary to train with the hollow points though? They are a bit more expensive than the round ones. I figured I could just keep a small box of hollow points at home, and go to the range with the cheap ones.

It depends on what you're doing. If you're just shooting at 5-7 yards then I don't think it matters.

You need to verify that your gun will function properly with your defensive HPs. If it's a modern design you should be OK with just a magazine or two.

You should also verify that you're able to control the recoil of your defensive hollowpoints. You don't need to grip the gun differently when shooting your defensive loads, but lighter loads (like generic bulk plinking loads) will let you get away with lazier grip pressure. For this, there are brands of FMJ that emulate popular HPs. For example, Federal American Eagle 147gr rounds are very close in velocity to the Federal HST 147gr. The Speer Lawman is designed to emulate Gold Dot loads.

Some folks also like to practice shooting bullseye targets at 25 yards with their carry ammo, and for that you also want something that emulates the same POI. That's an advanced shooter thing and you're probably not there yet.

Atticus_1354
Dec 9, 2006

Don't you go near that dog, you understand? Don't go near him, he's just as dangerous dead as alive.


human garbage bag posted:

Is it really necessary to train with the hollow points though? They are a bit more expensive than the round ones. I figured I could just keep a small box of hollow points at home, and go to the range with the cheap ones.

Do you want to be sure your hollowpoints function reliably out of your gun and shoot to your poa? If you actually think you will use your gun for self defense that means your life is in danger and I would personally like to be pretty drat sure everything is going to work well. You can also practice even more with the cheap fmj.

DkHelmet
Jul 10, 2001

I pity the foal...


human garbage bag posted:

Glock came in. Is it supposed to be possible to close the slide without using the slide release with an empty mag loaded and no round in the chamber by pulling the slide back and releasing it?

You shouldn’t be able to slingshot closed a Glock that has no rounds in the magazine. Check the slide stop and try it with a different mag.

There’s a little thingie cutout on the side of the mag that allows the mag follower to engage the slide stop and lift it. If the mag is empty the follower is up and the slide stop (and slide release lever) is up and engaged. If anything, it should be much harder to depress the slide release with an unloaded mag since you’re working against magazine spring tension.

Just checked my 17, 19, and 34 and all act this way. Something is up with yours.

human garbage bag
Jan 8, 2020



DkHelmet posted:

You shouldn’t be able to slingshot closed a Glock that has no rounds in the magazine. Check the slide stop and try it with a different mag.

There’s a little thingie cutout on the side of the mag that allows the mag follower to engage the slide stop and lift it. If the mag is empty the follower is up and the slide stop (and slide release lever) is up and engaged. If anything, it should be much harder to depress the slide release with an unloaded mag since you’re working against magazine spring tension.

Just checked my 17, 19, and 34 and all act this way. Something is up with yours.

No I think that means it's fine, my glock DOES NOT close with the slingshot method when I have a an empty mag in.

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DkHelmet
Jul 10, 2001

I pity the foal...


human garbage bag posted:

No I think that means it's fine, my glock DOES NOT close with the slingshot method when I have a an empty mag in.

Well, that’s all good then.

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