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Ceros_X
Aug 6, 2006

U.S. Marine


I shot a G42 a while back (and I own a G43) and I thought it was super pleasant to shoot. .380 ACP and not 9mm. I also though the P365 was not bad.

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Ceros_X
Aug 6, 2006

U.S. Marine


I think it is a good 'Ask a Lawyer's question.

The anecdotal thing I've heard is that you should keep your NFA firearms in a safe that the spouse doesn't have access to because they aren't included on the stamp (unless it's a trust and they're included).

Obviously no one's ever heard of that being relevant.

Ceros_X
Aug 6, 2006

U.S. Marine


Also the Sig P365 (G43 sized) and P365 XL (little smaller than a G19 and a lot thinner) that you could look at. I just bought a new P365 today (picking it up tomorrow after the background check finishes). Normally we recommend a more medium sized pistol (small pistols can be snappier) but if you're buying specifically to CCW and plan on an AR later, nothing wrong with that. Here's a pic of my the G43 and P365 from a while back.

Pic for scale:



G43 with 7 round mag, P365 with 12rd mag.

Also ask your apartment complex if you're allowed to mount a small safe for valuables - a lot of times they won't mind if the hole(s) is smaller than a quarter for wall mount stuff, easy to patch.

Ceros_X
Aug 6, 2006

U.S. Marine


Yeah, could be your accessory or the rail.

Time to break out the calipers!

Edit:. Also you did put the cross bolt through the picatinny rail and tighten it down etc? Is the movement side to side or butt to muzzle in the rail when looking down the sights.

Ceros_X fucked around with this message at 23:28 on Apr 30, 2020

Ceros_X
Aug 6, 2006

U.S. Marine


Disagree that Paul Harrel is trash.

I was a huge Glock fanboi and recently switched to an X5. I cannot wait for the influx of cheap USGI holsters mags etc to flood the market in a few years for the P320. One of the reasons I sold my Beretta 92FS is to get out of it while it was good and to move myself in a position to get the P320. I was really blown away by the X5 - I didn't take too much of a bath selling all three of my Glocks and moving to the Sig platform. I still think Glocks are good, cheap guns (I'm one of the people that can naturally shoot a stock Glock pretty well, apparently :V) but the X5 is a better shooting gun with a smaller aftermarket and more expensive parts for now.

Ceros_X
Aug 6, 2006

U.S. Marine


Pennywise the Frown posted:

Every time there's 50 new posts to this thread in a day I know it's a bunch of angry bullshit that probably turns off newbies from this forum.

Good thing that isn't what happened here so...??

Ceros_X
Aug 6, 2006

U.S. Marine


Pennywise the Frown posted:

We have different definitions I guess. It doesn't have to be screaming to be angry. Telling people what they have to do or what they can't do is offputting to new people.

Literally no one is doing that. Everyone is sharing their experiences with different popular mainstream handguns.

Ceros_X
Aug 6, 2006

U.S. Marine


Internet Wizard posted:

No definitely not the TLR-2

The TLR-1 HL is the entry-level light most recommended. Lasers are mostly worthless.


More lumen is always better, the TLR-1 HL has 1000 and can usually be found for just over $100. It's definitely the one to go with.

I don't know of any good lights that are USB rechargeable.

The TLR-1 HL is 800 lumens max unless something has changed recently (the Surefire X300U is the 1000 lumen light). Also the stock TLR-1 used to be the go to for the longest time...

Ceros_X
Aug 6, 2006

U.S. Marine


That's annoying, then. Even some sites selling it have it mixed up. Primary Arms lists it as 1k lumens but the specs say 800 lumens lol. https://www.primaryarms.com/streamlight-tlr1-hl-weapon-light-1000-lumens

Ceros_X
Aug 6, 2006

U.S. Marine


Tyler Whitney posted:

The number for when the output was upgraded is fairly high up there; serial 260k and up iirc

edit:

"The TLR-1 HL began the 800 lumens with serial number 177980
The TLR-2 HL began the 800 lumens with serial number 029308"
Serial number 303112A and 684277 began the
1000 lumen lights being manufactured from 11/14/19

it's actually the second upgrade, the original TLR-1 ran at 630 lumens.

Good info, thanks

Ceros_X
Aug 6, 2006

U.S. Marine


Nitrousoxide posted:

I'd imagine I'm orders of magnitude more likely to hurt myself with a negligent discharge then to protect myself in a self defense situation, even if I just use it at the range and keep it locked up at home. So I'm pretty concerned with reducing that risk.

When I wanted to get my first gun I was obsessed with having a gun with a grip safety and a manual safety because I thought a gun having a safety made it, well, safer.

People on this forum made me realize that a manual safety was a crutch. You treat every gun as if it was loaded, period. Doesn't matter if it has 5 safeties, a 34lb trigger, etc.

So what's the problem with safeties? Safeties can lessen your sense of danger around a firearm. "This firearm isn't as dangerous because the safety is on!" (Or the trigger pull is heavier etc). Until the safety accidentally gets pushed off in the holster (like my Beretta M9). You can't depend on mechanical things to replace mindset.

I would never recommend a super heavy trigger as a safety measure - please do some googling on "ny trigger glock why it is bad" - almost every opinion out there is that it was a universal bad decision made by bureaucrats to try and fix through 'gear' what should have been fixed by training and more range time.

Why is a DA/SA bad (with a heavy first trigger pull and lighter follow up shots)? Because you now have to get used to two trigger pull weights. So instead of getting used to the same pull weight all the time the first one takes forever and the second one surprises you with how light it is.. the military moved away from the M9 and now it's using a striker fired polymer pistol.

If you're worried about NDing, don't do any trigger upgrades until you are comfortable with your weapon and have gotten to take a firearms training course (not high speed low drag, just basics). Spend a lot of time dry firing so you get comfortable with exactly how much force the trigger takes to break (which is also free and will improve your shooting). If you don't care about self defense then store your gun holstered (with a trigger that covers the trigger guard) and the ammo away from the gun. Load your gun at the range pointing down range etc. If you are going to conceal carry you can carry the gun unloaded until you are comfortable that you won't accidentally pull the trigger. Put the firearm on your body while it is holstered - a lot of accidental discharges occur when someone goes to holster it and some clothing gets caught in the trigger guard area and bunches up. So skip it and take more time. Buy a quality kydex holster and not some cheap leather/cloth holster (this keeps the trigger guard area from deforming and being able to actuate the trigger). All of this wall of words is how you reduce the risk of negligent discharge, not a heavier trigger pull.

Ceros_X
Aug 6, 2006

U.S. Marine


Also worth noting that while muzzle breaks are good at keeping muzzles down and steady you can also feel it in your chest when you shoot and people around on the range can definitely tell when you're firing.

Combo devices don't really do any one thing well from my experience and the A2 flash hiders that are ubiquitous are actually pretty good at being a flash hider. If you're going to get a suppressor (and not directly thread it on to the barrel) then you'll need a compatible mount - most of these are available in a muzzle break or flash hider configuration.

Ceros_X
Aug 6, 2006

U.S. Marine


Cyrano4747 posted:

Ok, at its most basic it's as simple as shooting a target and then adjusting the sights so that the point of aim is equal to the point of impact, and then doing it again. So fire three shots and you're 3 inches to the right and two down? Well adjust the sights, try again. Three more shots and now you're 1 down 1 left? Adjust again, repeat until you're reliably on paper.

The issue you're probably having not following is when people talk about things like a 50/200 zero. Bullets travel in an arc when shot. As soon as they leave the barrel gravity starts to act on them, pulling them down towards the earth. If you're aiming dead center on a target that's 100 yards away your bullet will actually hit slightly below that. So, each zero has a distance at which it is right on. A 100 yard zero is actually aiming the gun slightly up so that the bullet will be right on the point of aim at 100 yards. Closer than 100 yards and it will be higher on the target, further than 100 yards and it will be lower.

At this point since you're shooting upwards slightly your bullet is actually describing a rainbow shape in the air. This means that for a set height on the target there are two distances where it will intersect (unless you're zeroed at the apex of the rainbow), once on the upward point of the arc and once when it's coming down. Where those distances are will depend on the specific bullet, and even the specific loading. For a lot of .223 loadings it so happens that a gun zeroed at 50 yards will also be zeroed at 200 yards, hence the "50/200 zero" nomenclature. This is really common for people who want a practical zero.

Here's a graph that shows this with .223.



Unfortunately I don't know what the exact load they were using there was (that was a fast GIS for the purposes of this explanation) but note that it isn't right on at 200. Any zero is going to be dependent on stuff like how hot the bullet is loaded, what the bullet itself weighs, etc. That said, if you're zeroed at 50/200 with bulk 55gr you'll be close enough with nice 55gr. Not right on, but in the ballpark.

I think this video is pretty good explaining different zero distances (not the greatest presenter voice but good info).

Ceros_X
Aug 6, 2006

U.S. Marine


I do a 50/200yd zero on my 11.5" and it was great shooting steel out to 300.

Ceros_X
Aug 6, 2006

U.S. Marine


Android Apocalypse posted:

What's your holdover at 300y with that zero like? I normally run 36/300 with the EOTech mounted in my Block II but my next build will be with an 11.5" barrel. Debating if keeping the same zero would work.

I should note I also am using a 36/300 zero on my AK, which I haven't verified at 300y yet.



Here is a pic from Sterlok. Basically you just hold for the head at 300(9.5~" high like sushi was saying). 400 is off the target by almost a target length. 200 and in is center mass, 300 (the dot is almost the same size as the head for estimating range). DD 11.5" with PPU M193.

Ceros_X
Aug 6, 2006

U.S. Marine


hallebarrysoetoro posted:

so I bought an AR-10, like you do nowadays, and there's very few rifle ranges that are fully open/open to public nowadays but I did find an indoor range that allows .308s. I still have scope to zero and my usual procedure was going from 25 to 100 to 200, so I figure I can get some time in and at least get it set up for 25...exactly how bad of an idea is it? I'm basically paranoid at taking a rifle to an indoor range because I've shot at one once when I was like 13 and oh god the RSO is going to kick me directly up into the rear end

Honestly if you are paying to be there and it's legal on the range, don't worry about it. Maybe try and go during a not busy time if you feel bad but it shouldn't stop you from zeroing your guns. People can always step off the line for a bit until you're done, or they can double up and deal with it. If the range is smart they'll move you all the way to the far end from everyone else etc.

Ceros_X
Aug 6, 2006

U.S. Marine


Tyro posted:

SGAMMO is generally well liked here. Honestly right now, wherever has the stuff you want in stock is probably safe.

I used to love them but lately them seem pretty high whenever I price shop them. I like https://www.targetsportsusa.com - they have an Amazon Prime type service where you get ammo shipped free once you pay the yearly fee as well as a discount on ammo (any quantity) and their cases ship free as well.

Ceros_X
Aug 6, 2006

U.S. Marine


Cobalt-60 posted:

What is sufficient reason to buy a gun?

I've never owned a gun. Never been very interested in them; didn't grow up around them. Picked up some gun knowledge by osmosis in the Navy, and shot enough to stay proficient.

I don't have any interest in hunting or target shooting, and I'm not a collector of anything.

Never wanted a gun for self-defense; there's nothing in my apartment worth killing anyone over.

But with the country circling the drain, and emboldened fascists running around, I don't know what to think.

I don't like the idea of having to use a gun, but the prospect of needing a gun and not having one seems...possible.

And personally, I live in a college town, where the liberals/leftists I know are more of the "write a strong letter to the paper" variety.

A sufficient reason to buy a gun is that you want one - you don't need a reason. I disagree with above posters putting conditional barriers to constitutional rights. You were in the Navy so you've already gotten the 4 rules and basics weapons handling stuff which is more than most people. Also lol at getting killed by drone strike in civil war 2.0. Not super successful crushing an insurgency with tanks and drones in Afghanistan.

Ceros_X
Aug 6, 2006

U.S. Marine


Peeches posted:

The outdoor range I want to join doesn't provide target stands, therefore I need to buy or make my own. Any recommendations? I'm not opposed to making my own, just curious if anyone has done this.

The other issue is I only have a small car ( ford focus) to transport, so they can't be too long.

Usually if you need to make your own target stands (not unusual) they provide very specific directions so that you know what to make. I.e. my old range had metal cables strung across the yard lines and provided instructions on how to make an H shaped target hanger you could hook onto the cables etc. I'd contact the range and ask for instructions, I'd bet :10bux: they have a PDF or whatever all typed up.

Ceros_X
Aug 6, 2006

U.S. Marine


If your bedroom has a closet just install a lock on it (deadbolt preferred, whatever) and hang it in the closet ready to go. There isn't much difference between a residential security cabinet and a solid door with a lock on it for the most part. Once you get up to safes that are a couple hundred pounds then you're in a different level of security. Something is better than nothing, though.

I personally keep my home defense AR in my bedroom closet, mag removed but nearby, on the top shelf for upstairs and a pistol downstairs on top of the fridge in a holster for the main level. Rest of the guns in the basement. With my house layout and distance from the front door it's an acceptable compromise. When my kids get a little older (able to rack a slide or charging handle) then I'll change my storage around. My kids have been around guns since birth and told never to touch without an adult present etc but better safe than sorry.

My situation may be a little unique, we never have anyone over and no neighbor kids, low crime area, etc. Wife stays at home. Your storage needs match your situation but you're responsible for how the gun is used etc.

Ceros_X
Aug 6, 2006

U.S. Marine


CarterUSM posted:

Yeah, securing it is on my list of short-term "to do"s. Fortunately, since I'm working from home, there's a local range that I can go to for practice...and they sell bulk 9mm FMJ ammo for range use for $0.32 a round (at the moment, anyway), so I feel I'm in decent shape, short term, for practice. Holster is less of an immediate concern, since I'll have to find some time to get through the required 16 hours of CCL training, and then also wait for the state police to process the paperwork (which evidently is moving glacially slow right now). I'd read some things about holsters that actively secure the gun, like an IMI Defense one, and I liked the idea of having the gun locked in, but really know virtually nothing about holsters at the moment.

Don't use frangible for self defense. Like other goons have said, it is designed for shoot houses and not self defense ammo. Don't use normal range training/FMJ ammo either. The gold standard of acceptable rounds to use is found here: http://www.ar15.com/ammo/project/Self_Defense_Ammo_FAQ/#mozTocId759557

The whole article is good to read, but if you are impatient just search for stuff on the 9mm approved list. It's gonna be expensive (in good times, the cheapest is 50 cents per round, all the way up to less than a dollar per) but you should buy at least two boxes of 50 (one to shoot and see how different the recoil is - the self defense rounds are usually loaded hotter, but more importantly to make sure your gun reliably cycles the different bullet shape of the JHP round).

For holsters, retention holsters are usually something you wear on the outside of your belt (especially duty belts, like a cop's patrol belt so you can keep people from grabbing it in a scuffle), exposed to the world. The other choice is an inside the waistband (IWB) that tucks the gun between your pants and body. This makes it hard to see (although your full size will be harder to conceal because it is bigger, still possible depending on your body size etc) and you have protection through obscurity. You can have the most secure holster in the world but if someone gets the drop on you to rob you (i.e. wait for you to pass by an alley mouth and then puts a knife to your neck) it isn't going to help. The concealed carry holster is what most people opt for. If you're going to be wearing it in the back country you can go for it, but you still might freak people out who aren't bad guys i.e. fellow astronomers or whatever.

You sound like you have the fundamentals down for accuracy and I'm sure you remember the 4 rules from NROTC, I'd look for a defensive handgun class to take to help with those skills relevant to carrying a concealed handgun. Your CCW class should cover all the relevant state laws regarding carrying concealed, make sure to take copious notes and ask good questions. I'd get a little more trigger time and more comfortable shooting before taking a class. You'll definitely need several mags, a bunch of ammo, and a holster (and possibly mag pouches) for any class. Google around your state and see what most require so you can start shopping. A good weapon light is also a must (Streamlight TLR-1 or Surefire X300U are the go to with the best holster compatibility) should be on your list - get a light before you get a holster or you'll be buying twice etc.

Ceros_X
Aug 6, 2006

U.S. Marine


The Rat posted:

The best thing you can do with a 3 point sling is sell it to fund am adjustable 2 point sling like the VCAS, VTAC, or Magpul MS1

#realtalk

Ceros_X
Aug 6, 2006

U.S. Marine


Anonymous Robot posted:

Don’t appendix carry, and absolutely don’t appendix carry if you’ve got a gut.

You seem to have a lot of very strong, very wrong absolute options.

Appendix carry is fine. Some people dislike it because 'the gun is pointed at your dick/femoral artery'. A lot of people mitigate this risk by using a quality hoslter that won't deform (they avoid leather and stick to kydex, etc) and they try and put the gun on already holstered etc since it helps negate one of the dangers of appendix carry (some shirt gets caught and bunches up inside the holster when you are holstering the gun etc).

Appendix carry is a lot harder if you've got a gut, though.

Ceros_X fucked around with this message at 13:02 on Aug 7, 2020

Ceros_X
Aug 6, 2006

U.S. Marine


22 Eargesplitten posted:

Guess I can change thread titles actually, huh. Thought all I could do was probations.

Sounds like operator error to me!

Ceros_X
Aug 6, 2006

U.S. Marine


infrared35 posted:

A regular .22 can wouldn’t survive a round of 5.56 through it.

https://youtu.be/lCuT2iYYTxg

Someone testing the 'does 5.55 clean out .22 crud?' https://youtu.be/SKzBeRvye60

Newbies: don't shoot 5.56 out of your .22lr can

Ceros_X fucked around with this message at 10:47 on Oct 14, 2020

Ceros_X
Aug 6, 2006

U.S. Marine


infrared35 posted:

Are those cans rated for .22WMR/5.7? That could explain why they lasted longer than I thought. I have an aluminum can that isn't even rated for .22 Mag.

Full auto .17 HMR | .22 LR | .22 MAG | 5.7x28 FN

I think it would have lasted a long rear end time doing single shots hunting or whatnot.

boxen posted:

Heh, it's deformed after the first shot. I wonder if it would have lasted much longer if he'd let it cool down more between shots.

the AAC one did, I didn't see any deformation on the Sparrow.

Ceros_X
Aug 6, 2006

U.S. Marine


EpicNemesis posted:

So new gun owner (well, will be a new gun owner next week when I pick it up)

I’m getting a bersa firestorm, and I keep reading it comes with factory gunk on it that needs to come off before shooting.

A couple quick questions on that, because everyone seems to assume the person reading (me) knows what the hell they are doing.

1. Can I use any lovely old rag/old shirt? I assume paper towels are a no go?

2. Anyone have a gun lube of choice? Some bersa forum I stumbled on had different lubes for different lube points. Is that really necessary or are they being over the top?

Not sure if you've gone down the YouTube rabbit hole yet but there are a bunch of videos out there with field stripping and cleaning instructions etc. The cleaning is pretty general across most pistols, field stripping is unique to each pistol. So "field strip bersa firestorm .380" and "pistol cleaning" are good search strings.

I.e. https://youtu.be/uQ8nMdpmblQ (I don't have a Bersa Firestorm so idk how good a guide this is but you can usually watch a few a get everything figured out. There's a patch I've got that says 'Certified Youtube Armorer' - it's true, you can learn almost everything about a fun on the 'Tube.


Don't know how new you are to guns etc but if you don't know what you're doing make sure you do your field strip and cleaning in a room without any live ammo. Last thing you want to do is go along with the guide and reinsert a magazine and function check and then do a desk pop/negligent discharge because you inserted the mag with your home defense rounds on accident etc.

No question is dumb, ways ask if you've got questions!

Ceros_X
Aug 6, 2006

U.S. Marine


Local state has 2+ day backlog on background checks (they don't use NICS, go through State Police for handguns) so everything takes longer and the FFLs get a lot of extra phone traffic with people seeing if their background check has come back etc.

Ceros_X
Aug 6, 2006

U.S. Marine


Cyrano4747 posted:

UPS also works fine for its. I've never noticed a difference between the two when shipping from the distribution center, but if your local FedEx has an idiot at the desk it might be easier just to drive to UPS.

Hopefully they gave him a prepaid mailing label vs him paying $$$ out of pocket to overnight a pistol or whatever.

Ceros_X
Aug 6, 2006

U.S. Marine


L0cke17 posted:

Yeah, they didn't and they said they wouldn't. I'm kinda pissed about it. poo poo didn't work out of the box brand new. I bought an aftermarket glock frame and it doesn't work with a stock glock slide. Looks like the rails the slide rides on are molded in incorrectly and the sear doesn't engage with the striker sufficiently so the trigger doesn't reset. They are saying it's a "parts comparability issue" and so they won't pay the shipping.

I might just write it off an buy a stock stripped glock frame and swap over all the internals instead of dealing with this bullshit.

What brand?

Ceros_X
Aug 6, 2006

U.S. Marine


This is why you go OEM Glock mags in bulk at like $20/per for 5 used on ARFCOM.

Ceros_X
Aug 6, 2006

U.S. Marine


Just skip the lovely shotgun and buy the chamber inserts and use a single shot break down 12g. Depending on how far you go you can get 3", 5", or 8" inserts (balancing weight and how far you want to shoot) in rifled or smooth bore configurations.

https://www.gunadapters.com/

Ceros_X
Aug 6, 2006

U.S. Marine


Could also just get a decent door lock and turn a closet into a security container. Take it off when you move out etc. Someone can still break down the door or whatever but probably better than a bike lock tbh.

Ceros_X
Aug 6, 2006

U.S. Marine


human garbage bag posted:

Is it a good idea to buy items from a gun store even if it would be cheaper to buy online in order to get in the good graces of the store?

I always like to give a store an opportunity to find a gun cheaper for me before I transfer it through them - "Hey I'm looking at getting this posurb Glock 22 for $250, are you able to get on for the same price or cheaper?"

Nope. Never happened. They check their wholesaler and then tell me whatever price is good etc. I gave them a shot. I'll usually try and pick up a box of ammo or some random accessory when I transfer the gun (if they make transfers easy by giving me a copy of their FFL cert to email to companies or whatever) but if not oh well.

Places that don't want you to transfer through them will charge like $50-75 for transfers (in non-California states) and have a list of online stores they won't transfer guns for (Buds, CheaperThanDirt, etc). Other places are happy to take your transfer business for $15-25 because they make money for running a background check and you might buy some poo poo from them while you're there filling out the paperwork.

Bottom line, don't feel obligated to do poo poo, feel free to grab a mag or some ammo if you feel guilty if they aren't poo poo bags.

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Ceros_X
Aug 6, 2006

U.S. Marine


This is why I never buy any lowers besides Aero M4E1. Only need Allen keys to install all the stuff that would normally be hammered in. Once you've built one that way you'll never want to go back.

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