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the yeti
Mar 29, 2008

I FUCKING LOVE COCAINE



Pigsfeet on Rye posted:

So I take it that you're going to get a professional to do a video examination of chimney (inside) and visual (outside) to see if there are any other issues?

That was already on the table in general for getting the fireplace ready to use; the chimneys almost definitely need lining to be ready/safe to have heat in them again.

the yeti fucked around with this message at 23:59 on May 13, 2020

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corgski
Feb 6, 2007



Pigsfeet on Rye posted:

So I take it that you're going to get a professional to do a video examination of chimney (inside) and visual (outside) to see if there are any other issues?

Oh yeah, none of these fireplaces are being used until we have them thoroughly inspected and repaired. The living room fireplace appears to have been a wood-burning fireplace but was converted to use a gas log by some previous owner (so it needs to be converted back) and the other two still have the original 1920s gas inserts in them, but no gas supply because everything supplying the walls was capped when the gas lamps were converted to electric.

e:f,b

corgski fucked around with this message at 00:05 on May 14, 2020

Kaiser Schnitzel
Mar 28, 2006

Schnitzel mit uns






corgski posted:

This thread is on fire and I am even more surprised this house isn't.


(living room chimney looking up)

It's made it 100 years without burning the house down what's the problem!!!?!?!

If it's anything like my parents' 1920s house, all the fireplaces were built to burn coal in a grate and aren't big enough/deep enough/don't draw well enough to burn wood very well. Maybe a coal fire in a grate didn't put off as many sparks or enough heat to set the house on fire?

corgski
Feb 6, 2007



I originally thought the two inserts we had were coal to be honest, but further inspection revealed that they are gas. And a wood burning fireplace in the living room was a big deal in arts & crafts architecture, plus other than the charred lumber in the smoke box where a lintel should be the shape and size of the living room fireplace suggests it's wood-burning. The fireback is finished masonry and it's absolutely not shaped correctly to hold a gas or coal insert from the era.

E: Also, in any fireplace smaller than a colonial-era "you can walk inside" fireplace, a wooden lintel is a fire hazard regardless of the fuel.

corgski fucked around with this message at 02:03 on May 14, 2020

Kaiser Schnitzel
Mar 28, 2006

Schnitzel mit uns






I hadnít thought about it being arts & crafts-that makes a lot of sense, and probably does give more weight to it being wood burning.

I was mostly joking but it really is pretty wild that the lintel never really caught fire and burned. Was that common in older houses?

Some places selling the wood are claiming charred/shuo sugi ban wood has a class A flame spread rating, but I canít find any 3rd party/NFPA testing. Maybe something similar happened with old lintels? https://nakamotoforestry.com/the-sc...i-ban-yakisugi/

Kaiser Schnitzel fucked around with this message at 03:16 on May 14, 2020

corgski
Feb 6, 2007



Kaiser Schnitzel posted:

I was mostly joking but it really is pretty wild that the lintel never really caught fire and burned. Was that common in older houses?

Not in the 20th century, no. You can find examples in older houses with much larger fireplaces where it was unlikely the wood would heat up enough to auto-ignite, but for a fireplace this size (~30"x24"x12") it was pretty well known that you shouldn't be using wood there. There should be a solid stone lintel or a length of steel spanning the gap and supporting the chimney (and in fact the brick fascia on this fireplace has a proper steel lintel supporting the course of bricks over the opening, it's only the actual structural lintel behind it that's wood.)

the yeti
Mar 29, 2008

I FUCKING LOVE COCAINE





We are a makita household now

corgski
Feb 6, 2007



This makita is so much nicer than my old black and decker.

Donít let anyone tell you Iím a size queen.

corgski
Feb 6, 2007



Todayís work, mowing the goddamn lawn. With a reel mower. It came out pretty good all things considered.



I also tried to fix the screen door only to discover the hinges are completely shot, and of course itís an all in one assembly.

Also twigs should not be used as hinge pins

Jaded Burnout
Jul 10, 2004




Your mum buys makita, your dad buys makita, and goddamnit while you're under our roof you're going to buy makita too. Our house, our rules.

corgski
Feb 6, 2007



Jaded Burnout posted:

Your mum buys makita, your dad buys makita, and goddamnit while you're under our roof you're going to buy makita too. Our house, our rules.

One Charger to rule them all, One Charger to find them,
One Charger to bring them all, and in the darkness bind them

Jaded Burnout
Jul 10, 2004




Have you tried.. not being a makita person? Why not find yourself a nice dewalt and make me some sideboards. What am I supposed to tell the neighbours?

corgski
Feb 6, 2007



I tried, I really did. I even went out and got myself a Milwaukee to see if I could. It was a nice tool, like you see in the magazines. But... not for me.

Slugworth
Feb 18, 2001

If two grown men can't make a pervert happy for a few minutes in order to watch a film about zombies, then maybe we should all just move to Iran!


corgski posted:

I tried, I really did. I even went out and got myself a Milwaukee to see if I could. It was a nice tool, like you see in the magazines. But... not for me.
Look, just do me a favor and don't bring it to Christmas until after Grandma passes away.

corgski
Feb 6, 2007



What about aunt Mary? She brings a makita every year, or do you really buy that lie that itís just her friendís? Iíve seen her working in the driveway!

Jaded Burnout
Jul 10, 2004




Why can't you be a Bosch user like your cousin? Blue lives matter, you know.

Kaiser Schnitzel
Mar 28, 2006

Schnitzel mit uns






I can't saw we're proud with your choice to be a makita person, but at least it helped you get rid of that awful black and decker. Well, they do say the green and silver ones can work some wood, but why can't you just find some nice blue tools like everyone else? Or even yellow? Hell at this point I'd be happy if you chose red, but green....I mean really.

Jaded Burnout
Jul 10, 2004




Kaiser Schnitzel posted:

I can't saw we're proud with your choice to be a makita person, but at least it helped you get rid of that awful black and decker. Well, they do say the green and silver ones can work some wood, but why can't you just find some nice blue tools like everyone else? Or even yellow? Hell at this point I'd be happy if you chose red, but green....I mean really.

Deal with it, grandad

Clayton Bigsby
Apr 17, 2005



the yeti posted:



We are a makita household now

I picked up a set of their 10.8 volt (12V in the US I think) stuff last fall to have something lighter weight to use. Got the drill/driver and impact driver + fast charger. Been using them exclusively since and the larger gear just gathers dust. The impact driver will happily drive massive screws all day with the occasional battery change. And it's all so light and pleasant to use.

corgski
Feb 6, 2007



Tonight we feast, for tomorrow we die rip out most of the basement electrical, hang running boards, and rewire it to code



Homemade bibimbap is a good last meal, no?

Clayton Bigsby posted:

I picked up a set of their 10.8 volt (12V in the US I think) stuff last fall to have something lighter weight to use. Got the drill/driver and impact driver + fast charger. Been using them exclusively since and the larger gear just gathers dust. The impact driver will happily drive massive screws all day with the occasional battery change. And it's all so light and pleasant to use.

My work has a mix of makita and dewalt and I'm honestly just so happy with the makita gear that I knew exactly which I wanted to buy when I finally had an excuse. It's extremely compact and lightweight for the power.

corgski fucked around with this message at 01:44 on May 23, 2020

Jaded Burnout
Jul 10, 2004




corgski posted:

My work has a mix of makita and dewalt and I'm honestly just so happy with the makita gear that I knew exactly which I wanted to buy when I finally had an excuse. It's extremely compact and lightweight for the power.

I probably would've gone makita if they didn't discontinue their magazine-style batteries for the smaller 10.8V drivers. Clipping in a big square battery kinda ruins the balance.

corgski
Feb 6, 2007



the yeti talked me out of adding a condom wrapper but I present to you, toolporn.jpg

Skippy Granola
Sep 3, 2011

It's not what it looks like.


Jaded Burnout posted:

Why can't you be a Bosch user like your cousin? Blue lives matter, you know.

You leave my Bosch tools out of this

corgski
Feb 6, 2007



So a question for the thread. How unusual is it for the interior of an old stone foundation to be parged?

Because I just pulled down some of the gas station plastic bullshit and found a layer of parging with fake cinderblock pointing cut into it that is spalling off in big chunks to reveal the original cut stone foundation underneath.

corgski fucked around with this message at 07:41 on May 31, 2020

Zoesdare
Sep 24, 2005

Still floofin

You should ask and/or check Queen Victoriaís thread. She has similar basement issues, I believe. Her house is a Victorian, but I think she used to live in an arts and crafts house before that.


https://forums.somethingawful.com/s...40&pagenumber=7

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Mister Dog
Dec 27, 2005



corgski posted:

So a question for the thread. How unusual is it for the interior of an old stone foundation to be parged?

Because I just pulled down some of the gas station plastic bullshit and found a layer of parging with fake cinderblock pointing cut into it that is spalling off in big chunks to reveal the original cut stone foundation underneath.

Are you in my basement rn? I have this all over the place.
I think most of it was a PO attempt to cover some defects, which of course failed because nothing was done to affect water migration from the other side. Any repair of the interior side of an old stone foundation with anything other than a mortar carefully-selected to match the hardness and porosity of the stone is going to do this. Iím no mason, but Iíll bet this is your problem.

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