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got off on a technicality
Feb 7, 2007

oh dear


1:1 ratio of self-raising flour to cream by weight makes near-perfect biscuits every time. Slop it into a mixing bowl and use your hands. Don't overmix. Sometimes I like to brush with butter before baking. Other biscuit recipes might be fractionally better, but the simplicity of this one is amazing

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Notahippie
Feb 4, 2003

Kids, it's not cool to have Shane MacGowan teeth

got off on a technicality posted:

1:1 ratio of self-raising flour to cream by weight makes near-perfect biscuits every time. Slop it into a mixing bowl and use your hands. Don't overmix. Sometimes I like to brush with butter before baking. Other biscuit recipes might be fractionally better, but the simplicity of this one is amazing

Imma try this, what temperature do you cook them at?

Notahippie
Feb 4, 2003

Kids, it's not cool to have Shane MacGowan teeth

I made a cup of self-rising flour with bread flour, which came to 178g. Added 178g of cream, roughly mixed and patted it into 1 inch thick dough and cut into squares, baked at 425 for 10 minutes in pre-heated iron skillet.

Texture was great, way better than I expected. Only complaint was that they were slightly too loose. Flavor was good but not amazing.

All in all a hell of a recipe considering it took 12 minutes from nothing to biscuits.

Resting Lich Face
Feb 21, 2019


This case of an intraperitoneal zucchini is unusual, and does raise questions as to how hard one has to push a blunt vegetable to perforate the rectum.


Notahippie posted:

Flavor was good but not amazing.

They're a vessel for sausage gravy they don't need to have all that much flavor.

ThePopeOfFun
Feb 15, 2010


I'm no chef, but I've got all this time and a relevant contribution I got for Christmas.



Sean Brock's South.

Kind of an obvious book for a Southern food thread, but his journey to sobriety compells and encourages me through my own life stuff. I also moved to the South for a number of years and having left, I miss the people, pace and food, so I've been looking for connections.

This book is one.


Beautiful photography and interesting presentations of Brock's philosophy and mission to demand respect for the South's people and culture, through food.

For instance, the South is about as big as Europe.



Is it a good cook book?

Well duh, yes, but I was initially disappointed.

That's on me for expecting easy Southern recipes from Sean Brock. Which isn't to say he couldn't, but this book is about making a case for hyper regional Southern kitchens.

Like cooking over a big-rear end fire.


Brock's book is a library of several Southern regions. Most recipes call for a regional ingredient or vinegar, sauce, pickled component requiring hours or days to prepare ahead of time.




If you build your pantry according to South, you'll get rich, complex dishes of which many have only experienced in the lowest form. Waffle House, grits in a box, gravy from powder, etc. There's a lot of reasons why everyone sees Southern food as Waffle House, boxed grits and powdered gravy (by no means talking poo poo on Waffle House). South touches on those, but the main focus is phenomenally great food.



That's part of what makes it challenging for someone like me, who's ability stops at following a complex recipe and flavoring food well. A cookbook with a pantry section intimidates me.



Brilliant stuff. I'm not about to convert my kitchen or pantry to this level, so it's more an aspirational book for my ability and commitment to cooking.

It's inspiring and totally awesome though, so you should buy it.

got off on a technicality
Feb 7, 2007

oh dear


Notahippie posted:

I made a cup of self-rising flour with bread flour, which came to 178g. Added 178g of cream, roughly mixed and patted it into 1 inch thick dough and cut into squares, baked at 425 for 10 minutes in pre-heated iron skillet.

Texture was great, way better than I expected. Only complaint was that they were slightly too loose. Flavor was good but not amazing.

All in all a hell of a recipe considering it took 12 minutes from nothing to biscuits.

Nice! Glad you liked it. I like 450f for about the same time, but it's all down to your preference

mediaphage
Mar 22, 2007

Excuse me, pardon me, sheer perfection coming through


Resting Lich Face posted:

They're a vessel for sausage gravy they don't need to have all that much flavor.

This is like suggesting that sandwich bread doesn't need to taste good because you use it for sandwiches.

I've made the cream biscuits before but imo they don't taste as good as butter. But then, what does?

Kaiser Schnitzel
Mar 28, 2006

Schnitzel mit uns




mediaphage posted:

But then, what does?
Pig grease

mediaphage
Mar 22, 2007

Excuse me, pardon me, sheer perfection coming through



Disagree. At least for biscuits. I like the sweetness and salt a good salted butter brings. Toad in the hole I am down for frying in bacon fat tho.

Suspect Bucket
Jan 14, 2012

SHRIMPDOR WAS A MAN
I mean, HE WAS A SHRIMP MAN
er, maybe also A DRAGON
or possibly
A MINOR LEAGUE BASEBALL TEAM
BUT HE WAS STILL
SHRIMPDOR


ok fine collards are great y'all win



Made stewed collards with fried white crappie I caught this morning. All turned out dang good.

I did cheat and use bacon instead of salt pork, because I cant get out to the store right now,

Kaiser Schnitzel
Mar 28, 2006

Schnitzel mit uns




There is absolutely nothing wrong with bacon. I much prefer it to salt pork because a lot of time salt pork isnít smoked or isnít heavily smoked.

Those crappie look delicious. How did you fry them?

My uncle is one of those people who can eat whole bass/bream/catfish and leave nothing behind but the cartoonish fish skeleton, and I have no idea how he does it.

Now I want some fried catfish but my kitchen is terrible for frying since it has no exhaust anywhere

Suspect Bucket
Jan 14, 2012

SHRIMPDOR WAS A MAN
I mean, HE WAS A SHRIMP MAN
er, maybe also A DRAGON
or possibly
A MINOR LEAGUE BASEBALL TEAM
BUT HE WAS STILL
SHRIMPDOR


Kaiser Schnitzel posted:

There is absolutely nothing wrong with bacon. I much prefer it to salt pork because a lot of time salt pork isn’t smoked or isn’t heavily smoked.

Those crappie look delicious. How did you fry them?

My uncle is one of those people who can eat whole bass/bream/catfish and leave nothing behind but the cartoonish fish skeleton, and I have no idea how he does it.

Now I want some fried catfish but my kitchen is terrible for frying since it has no exhaust anywhere

I caught them at about 1pm, gutted them at 2, coated them with gator seasoning ( salt, celery, paprika, black pepper) and let them chill in the fridge, then I dredged them in AP and shallow fried in canola at 6:30. I topped the collards with the pan drippings. Fish was delicious! White crappie are excellent eating fresh water fish. Great for the freezer as well.

Normally I freeze freshwater fish a few days to kill parasites, but it's spring and the water is still pretty cool. Lower risk of parasites. I also made sure to cook beyond 145°

Suspect Bucket fucked around with this message at 00:52 on May 6, 2020

Resting Lich Face
Feb 21, 2019


This case of an intraperitoneal zucchini is unusual, and does raise questions as to how hard one has to push a blunt vegetable to perforate the rectum.


I wish it wasn't so sketch eating out of the waterway behind my place. Industrial waste makes a nice piquant seasoning but the tumors are a pretty big drawback.

Anne Whateley
Feb 11, 2007
i like nice words


I can do the cartoon skeleton too. I would say watch something on youtube that shows how to break it down, then you really only have to do it a handful of times before your fish ends up looking piranhaized. It's easier than breaking down a chicken and the practice is more delicious.

Kaiser Schnitzel
Mar 28, 2006

Schnitzel mit uns




Suspect Bucket posted:

I caught them at about 1pm, gutted them at 2, coated them with gator seasoning ( salt, celery, paprika, black pepper) and let them chill in the fridge, then I dredged them in AP and shallow fried in canola at 6:30. I topped the collards with the pan drippings. Fish was delicious! White crappie are excellent eating fresh water fish. Great for the freezer as well.

Normally I freeze freshwater fish a few days to kill parasites, but it's spring and the water is still pretty cool. Lower risk of parasites. I also made sure to cook beyond 145°

Crappie are really great. Good to know they freeze well too. I used to think I hated lake fish until I had some that were hours out of the water really really fresh and that changed my mind even on bass. Cornmeal is my go-to for pan frying because it gets so nice and crispy, but it looks like you got plenty of crisp with just flour.

TheKingslayer
Sep 3, 2008

There are no men like me. There's only me.





It was shrimp and grits night.

onemanlan
Oct 4, 2006
I HAVE A MAN CRUSH ON YOU TOO, YOU LOVABLE FAGGOT!

Any fried fish or shrimp and grits is money. Doubly so if you can get the main items blackened. Triply so if you add some greens! Thick grits please.

I hope I can make a smoking contribution for pulled pork as well as smoked chicken + Alabama white sauce. If that's better suited for the BBQ thread let me know and Ill put it there. I also know a fair bit about crawfish, however I'm not sure if fits here either. Also not cooking related, but ask me a story about shucking oysters in a bathroom at 3AM while drunk and hungry.

onemanlan fucked around with this message at 04:16 on May 6, 2020

I. M. Gei
Jun 26, 2005

I fear the man who has hit one dinger ten thousand times.




I wish I liked grits.

Every time Iíve ever had them theyíre just bland and gritty and nasty, like eating cream of kitty litter soup or some poo poo, but maybe those were all just lovely grits? Iím thinking theyíre not supposed to taste like that.

TheKingslayer
Sep 3, 2008

There are no men like me. There's only me.





Yeah that's a bit weird and I hear it a lot. I usually just do mine by the package instructions (sometimes with chicken stock) instead of water and don't be stingy with butter, cheese, and pepper.

Anne Whateley
Feb 11, 2007
i like nice words


If you've only had completely plain grits, that's like having completely plain pasta or oatmeal or a potato. It has everything to do with what you put in it (including an alarming amount of butter) and on it.

Croatoan
Jun 24, 2005

I am inevitable.
ROBBLE GROBBLE


Like any other porridge, grits with nothing else are boring af. Butter, cheese, salt & pepper make the dish. Sure, as mentioned chicken stock is a nice upgrade but using milk isn't bad as long as it has some other seasoning for some sort of flavoring. Try them with smoked gruyere and some butter, it's a total game changer. Oh and one other thing, just like with other porridges, the more "instant" you get the shittier they'll be. If it's a packet that takes 1 minute in the microwave, it's not going to be very good. Stone ground grits only take like 10-20 minutes and are soooo much better.

Kaiser Schnitzel
Mar 28, 2006

Schnitzel mit uns




They need salt more than anything imo. Cheese and milk is good too, but lots of salt and some butter are essential to making plain grits edible.

Wungus
Mar 5, 2004



A good pepper too. Best grits are stone-ground, enough butter that you start to get nervous, some gruyere or a decent parm, and a good crack of a good pepper. I don't even meat anymore but you serve me that with some chorizo oil dribbled over it and some garlic butter shrimp and I'm gonna just wreck my week with how much I eat.

Mr. Wiggles
Dec 1, 2003

We are all drinking from the highball glass of ideology.

I mean, grits are just polenta. You've had good polenta, right? Treat grits the same way.

I just had breakfast but now I want some grits yum.

mediaphage
Mar 22, 2007

Excuse me, pardon me, sheer perfection coming through


Mr. Wiggles posted:

I mean, grits are just polenta. You've had good polenta, right? Treat grits the same way.

I just had breakfast but now I want some grits yum.

Beat me to it. I love grits with cheese, butter, salt. Plus some kind of spicy meat crumbled on top. mmmmmmm

dinahmoe
Sep 13, 2007



I have a friend in Georgia who sends me smoked grits from a local farmer's market. Made properly with chicken stock, cream and cheese, they are fantastic.

Resting Lich Face
Feb 21, 2019


This case of an intraperitoneal zucchini is unusual, and does raise questions as to how hard one has to push a blunt vegetable to perforate the rectum.


Grits get an unfair rap.

loving delicious when done right... most people don't do em right.

Just like so many other dishes.

stinkypete
Nov 27, 2007
wow



Anyone have a good red eye grits recipe? I think my Grandpa was cheating with Folgers instant crystals and ham drippings.

Croatoan
Jun 24, 2005

I am inevitable.
ROBBLE GROBBLE


stinkypete posted:

Anyone have a good red eye grits recipe? I think my Grandpa was cheating with Folgers instant crystals and ham drippings.

I don't because I'm not a fan but honestly when I've seen it done, your Grandpa was about 9/10 the way there, I see why he did it the way he did. I've only seen super strong coffee used to deglaze a country ham pan. I could be wrong and there's some amazing version I don't know of so by all means, someone help this guy.

mediaphage
Mar 22, 2007

Excuse me, pardon me, sheer perfection coming through


I'm not into them, but start out with experiments. If you have an espresso machine, try adding a spent puck to a small batch of grits. It's a way of adding flavour without adding too much coffee. Failing that, start by adding a little coffee as a proportion of your water until you get the flavour you want.

Notahippie
Feb 4, 2003

Kids, it's not cool to have Shane MacGowan teeth

Croatoan posted:

I don't because I'm not a fan but honestly when I've seen it done, your Grandpa was about 9/10 the way there, I see why he did it the way he did. I've only seen super strong coffee used to deglaze a country ham pan. I could be wrong and there's some amazing version I don't know of so by all means, someone help this guy.

Basically this - red eye gravy is just using coffee to deglaze a pan you cooked ham in. Some people love it, some hate it. Personally I think it's good as a flavoring to bland carbs (biscuits, grits, etc) but it's not what I think of when I think of gravy.

learnincurve
May 15, 2014

What is this boring crap we're watching? Check if Antiques Roadshow is on




Coming over from the general thread - The green part of the recipes I can do but whatís an alternative for smoked pork/ham hock? Smoked meat in general is really specialist in the U.K. and the latter I can only get from the meat market which is shut down because of coronavirus.

I have pork Iíve diced, a big belly pork joint, and a load of really quite poo poo beef from a brisket joint I cut into strips and when I tried a stir fry with it brown liquid (possibly dye) bubbled out of it.

mediaphage
Mar 22, 2007

Excuse me, pardon me, sheer perfection coming through


learnincurve posted:

Coming over from the general thread - The green part of the recipes I can do but whatís an alternative for smoked pork/ham hock? Smoked meat in general is really specialist in the U.K. and the latter I can only get from the meat market which is shut down because of coronavirus.

I have pork Iíve diced, a big belly pork joint, and a load of really quite poo poo beef from a brisket joint I cut into strips and when I tried a stir fry with it brown liquid (possibly dye) bubbled out of it.

I'd dump in the joint and chop and add some bacon if you're doing something with a lot of liquid. If you're doing a quick skillet fry/braise, I'd just use the bacon.

That Works
Jul 21, 2006


learnincurve posted:

Coming over from the general thread - The green part of the recipes I can do but whatís an alternative for smoked pork/ham hock? Smoked meat in general is really specialist in the U.K. and the latter I can only get from the meat market which is shut down because of coronavirus.

I have pork Iíve diced, a big belly pork joint, and a load of really quite poo poo beef from a brisket joint I cut into strips and when I tried a stir fry with it brown liquid (possibly dye) bubbled out of it.

I find that blooming some smoked paprika in hot fat gets you a good bit of the way there if you don't have smoked meat handy.




That said for collard greens what I've really been digging is:

1 bunch collards, largest stems removed, coarsely chopped. (about 2-3 lbs)
1 large onion, quartered and sliced
3-4 cloves garlic coarsely chopped
2 tbls fish sauce
2 tsp smoked paprika
1 tsp cayenne pepper
1 tsp black pepper
3 tbls fat (bacon grease, peanut oil, whatever. Animal fat generally better here imo)
3-4 tbls stock or white wine

Optional - 1/4 lb of meat to brown, dice and add.

In a dutch oven on med-high heat I brown up some meat (if using) in just 1 tbls or so of oil and let that build up a good fond browning on all sides. Remove meat and reserve, when cool chop into small pieces. I've used old ham, leftover turkey, random sausage (chorizo is great here).

Add the rest of your fat here, let get to temp then toss in onions and stir, add in fish sauce and continue to cook until most of the liquid is boiled away and onions start to release their liquid and get transparent, turn heat to medium, continue cooking until onions are well carmelized. Add in paprika, black pepper, cayenne and garlic. Stir until garlic is fragrant.

Add chopped collard greens in bunches, stirring and letting it wilt and reduce in size, then continue adding until its all in the pot. You may need to add more oil depending on how much greens are added here. Stir, deglaze the pan if necessary with some wine or stock. Continue to stir and place heat on low, cover and let simmer. Check every 20-30 mins and stir making sure nothing is burning. Keep heat low and add more liquid if necessary (should not be unless you run the stove too hot). Simmer for ~2h or until largest stems get soft. Depending on what kind of meat you used, add it in along the way. If its sausage I wait and add it in 10-20 mins before finishing. If its a tough cut you can let it simmer the whole time.

Just before serving hit it with a squeeze of lemon juice or splash of vinegar.
I've made mine this way for years and it's a hit, even for people who hated collards previously. Feel free to mix it up like add in mustard or dandelion greens with it, toss in some caraway seeds, go nuts.

Resting Lich Face
Feb 21, 2019


This case of an intraperitoneal zucchini is unusual, and does raise questions as to how hard one has to push a blunt vegetable to perforate the rectum.


Bacon works in southern cooking recipes as a substitute. It's not optimal but it'll get you where you want to go.

And yeah like the guy above suggested a dash of smoked paprika should help fill the gap if you're looking for a smokey flavor. But, like Kaiser said, the real point is that the meat is cured.

Resting Lich Face fucked around with this message at 18:08 on May 15, 2020

Kaiser Schnitzel
Mar 28, 2006

Schnitzel mit uns




learnincurve posted:

Coming over from the general thread - The green part of the recipes I can do but whatís an alternative for smoked pork/ham hock? Smoked meat in general is really specialist in the U.K. and the latter I can only get from the meat market which is shut down because of coronavirus.

I have pork Iíve diced, a big belly pork joint, and a load of really quite poo poo beef from a brisket joint I cut into strips and when I tried a stir fry with it brown liquid (possibly dye) bubbled out of it.

I think really the cured part is probably more important than smoked. Isn't British bacon still cured/salted? Ham or something would be good, or some other cut with with lots of fat/connective tissue. IDK exactly what cut a belly pork joint is, but I'd guess that would be your best bet. Beef brisket might be good too, though a different flavor. It's tough stuff with lots of flavor and connective tissue. Basically whatever bone/joint you'd use to make soup/stock with would be fine.

You also don't really need the meat. I've done them vegetarian with just broth, onion, pepper, and some olive oil, or you can add some gelatin to get that lip-smacking collagen that the ham hock provides.

Resting Lich Face
Feb 21, 2019


This case of an intraperitoneal zucchini is unusual, and does raise questions as to how hard one has to push a blunt vegetable to perforate the rectum.


Kaiser Schnitzel posted:

You also don't really need the meat.

learnincurve
May 15, 2014

What is this boring crap we're watching? Check if Antiques Roadshow is on




Ah now I have a load of cheap middle cut bacon* and a massive slow cooker so I can do all this. 🙂

*unsmoked, we do have smoked bacon but the stuff in the supermarket is really not very nice, you have to go to the few remaining butchers or farm/specialist shops who still do traditional smoking and curing to get anything like what an American or Canadian would think acceptable.

That Works
Jul 21, 2006


learnincurve posted:

Ah now I have a load of cheap middle cut bacon* and a massive slow cooker so I can do all this. 🙂

*unsmoked, we do have smoked bacon but the stuff in the supermarket is really not very nice, you have to go to the few remaining butchers or farm/specialist shops who still do traditional smoking and curing to get anything like what an American or Canadian would think acceptable.

Yeah add some smoked paprika in there or even some liquid smoke if you have it and you'll be golden.

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Notahippie
Feb 4, 2003

Kids, it's not cool to have Shane MacGowan teeth

Kaiser Schnitzel posted:

I think really the cured part is probably more important than smoked. Isn't British bacon still cured/salted? Ham or something would be good, or some other cut with with lots of fat/connective tissue. IDK exactly what cut a belly pork joint is, but I'd guess that would be your best bet. Beef brisket might be good too, though a different flavor. It's tough stuff with lots of flavor and connective tissue. Basically whatever bone/joint you'd use to make soup/stock with would be fine.

You also don't really need the meat. I've done them vegetarian with just broth, onion, pepper, and some olive oil, or you can add some gelatin to get that lip-smacking collagen that the ham hock provides.

I'm that vanishingly rare thing, a vegetarian southerner, and IMO good collards and beans are doable without meat but it's harder. You need something to replace the fat and the umami that they bring. A good start is cooking the onions long enough to caramelize them, adding extra garlic, and adding a dash of soy sauce or braggs helps. Smoked paprika as mentioned is really good, and I like to use a lot of olive oil or butter to up the fat content.

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