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ulmont
Sep 15, 2010

IF I EVER MISS VOTING IN AN ELECTION (EVEN AMERICAN IDOL) ,OR HAVE UNPAID PARKING TICKETS, PLEASE TAKE AWAY MY FRANCHISE


Kaiser Schnitzel posted:

Crappie are really great.

Those are speckled perch while you're in this thread.

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learnincurve
May 15, 2014

What is this boring crap we're watching? Check if Antiques Roadshow is on




I gave it An Go.

The green stuff



Frying bacon and onions with smoked paprika



In the slow cooker





I didn’t have corn so I made biscuits (because I think I’m funny), but also garlic rolls.



Done.



mediaphage
Mar 22, 2007

Excuse me, pardon me, sheer perfection coming through


learnincurve posted:

I gave it An Go.

The green stuff



Frying bacon and onions with smoked paprika



In the slow cooker





I didn’t have corn so I made biscuits (because I think I’m funny), but also garlic rolls.



Done.





Would eat

Doom Rooster
Sep 3, 2008



Pillbug

Hey there southern food goons. I'm about to start development on a biscuits and gravy recipe and was hoping to get y'all's opinions before I get started. I'll be doing plenty of experimenting and can end up answering most of these, but would love a head start with advice from some goons.

Biscuits. For biscuits and gravy, is the buttermilk biscuit still king even for this application? I imagine that I'll end up with some butter content still, but we have a pretty good supply of lard, and an absolutely overwhelming amount of tallow, so going to need to use a good bit of both. Current thinking is to use lard for the gravy roux, and tallow/butter for the biscuits. Any thoughts?

Sausage. I'll be making the sausage from scratch, and am currently planing on a pretty standard country breakfast sausage. Sage, black and red-pepper heavy. Any special considerations I should keep in mind here? Finer than usual grind ideal? Higher/lower than the usual sausage ratio of 70:30 lean:fat? I'm planning on giving at least 24 hours after making before use to let flavors do their thing, but does anyone think longer is better? I feel like dried sage is the classic, but schmancy recipes online all call for fresh. Was thinking about using both. Thoughts?

Gravy. I'm aiming for a very traditional sausage gravy, heavy on the black pepper. I feel like I've got a pretty good handle on this one already, but would love input if anyone has a secret that they think makes a big difference.

Doom Rooster fucked around with this message at 20:42 on May 19, 2020

Croatoan
Jun 24, 2005

I am inevitable.
ROBBLE GROBBLE


Honestly that all sounds about right, yeah.

mediaphage
Mar 22, 2007

Excuse me, pardon me, sheer perfection coming through


Doom Rooster posted:

Hey there southern food goons. I'm about to start development on a biscuits and gravy recipe and was hoping to get y'all's opinions before I get started. I'll be doing plenty of experimenting and can end up answering most of these, but would love a head start with advice from some goons.

Biscuits. For biscuits and gravy, is the buttermilk biscuit still king even for this application? I imagine that I'll end up with some butter content still, but we have a pretty good supply of lard, and an absolutely overwhelming amount of tallow, so going to need to use a good bit of both. Current thinking is to use lard for the gravy roux, and tallow/butter for the biscuits. Any thoughts?

Sausage. I'll be making the sausage from scratch, and am currently planing on a pretty standard country breakfast sausage. Sage, black and red-pepper heavy. Any special considerations I should keep in mind here? Finer than usual grind ideal? Higher/lower than the usual sausage ratio of 70:30 lean:fat? I'm planning on giving at least 24 hours after making before use to let flavors do their thing, but does anyone think longer is better? I feel like dried sage is the classic, but schmancy recipes online all call for fresh. Was thinking about using both. Thoughts?

Gravy. I'm aiming for a very traditional sausage gravy, heavy on the black pepper. I feel like I've got a pretty good handle on this one already, but would love input if anyone has a secret that they think makes a big difference.

Sausage is always subjective but I like mine to have sage, black pepper, red pepper, mustard seed, anise or fennel seed, salt. Fwiw, I always make sausage gravy by using the rendered fat from the fried sausage for the roux; there's no real need to add extra fat. Since it'll be crumbled, you could probably get away with making a leaner sausage and using some of your tallow, I suppose.

I maintain you should use the maximum amount of butter you can, as it always makes for better tasting biscuits (again, in my opinion). You can easily get away with half and half, though, I'm sure.

SSJ_naruto_2003
Oct 12, 2012





I usually make sausage patties and leave out a bit of the sausage and crumble it into the pan, cook it, then add flour for the roux.

As for Gravy, no such thing as too much black pepper

SSJ_naruto_2003 fucked around with this message at 01:08 on May 20, 2020

Croatoan
Jun 24, 2005

I am inevitable.
ROBBLE GROBBLE


mediaphage posted:

Sausage is always subjective but I like mine to have sage, black pepper, red pepper, mustard seed, anise or fennel seed, salt. Fwiw, I always make sausage gravy by using the rendered fat from the fried sausage for the roux; there's no real need to add extra fat. Since it'll be crumbled, you could probably get away with making a leaner sausage and using some of your tallow, I suppose.

I maintain you should use the maximum amount of butter you can, as it always makes for better tasting biscuits (again, in my opinion). You can easily get away with half and half, though, I'm sure.

Agreed about the fat from the sausage, I was just thinking of a way to use the lard they said they wanted to use. also nah on the anise, I hate the taste but that's like, my opinion man.

mediaphage
Mar 22, 2007

Excuse me, pardon me, sheer perfection coming through


Croatoan posted:

Agreed about the fat from the sausage, I was just thinking of a way to use the lard they said they wanted to use. also nah on the anise, I hate the taste but that's like, my opinion man.

Yeah, like i said, sausage is subjective! you should see the complete garbage that passes for "breakfast sausage" in canada. it's a travesty.

learnincurve
May 15, 2014

What is this boring crap we're watching? Check if Antiques Roadshow is on




Righty ho then kind people I think of as “goon friends who do opposite cooking to me” I have by complete chance managed to locate this here Gammon shank and it’s the first I’ve seen in about 3 months. Being the U.K. it’s basically just hacked off the pig and then sold as is, so the question is what would you do with it?

Only registered members can see post attachments!

Mr. Wiggles
Dec 1, 2003

We are all drinking from the highball glass of ideology.

You make schweinshaxe. Which is southern in that German food is a thing that exists in the south. But that's what I'd do.

Otherwise, a long braise and then serve it with Lima beans and something to soak up the broth, like rice or something.

Stringent
Dec 22, 2004

The internet is the universal sewer.


learnincurve posted:

Righty ho then kind people I think of as “goon friends who do opposite cooking to me” I have by complete chance managed to locate this here Gammon shank and it’s the first I’ve seen in about 3 months. Being the U.K. it’s basically just hacked off the pig and then sold as is, so the question is what would you do with it?



That's referred to as a ham hock in southern cooking, so just googling that should give you some ideas.

Resting Lich Face
Feb 21, 2019


This case of an intraperitoneal zucchini is unusual, and does raise questions as to how hard one has to push a blunt vegetable to perforate the rectum.


Stringent posted:

That's referred to as a ham hock in southern cooking, so just googling that should give you some ideas.

Isn't a ham hock usually cured? That cut of meat sure isn't.

SSJ_naruto_2003
Oct 12, 2012





Resting Lich Face posted:

Isn't a ham hock usually cured? That cut of meat sure isn't.

I usually would call it a smoked ham hock but I've never seen one not smoked so...

Stringent
Dec 22, 2004

The internet is the universal sewer.


It's just the part of the pig, but yeah it's frequently smoked in southern cooking.

Kaiser Schnitzel
Mar 28, 2006

Schnitzel mit uns




What’s everyone’s favorite baby yellow squash preparation? I’m about to be buried in them from the garden. Sliced, lightly bread in cornmeal and fry? Sautéed with onions and some bacon grease?

Notahippie
Feb 4, 2003

Kids, it's not cool to have Shane MacGowan teeth

Kaiser Schnitzel posted:

What’s everyone’s favorite baby yellow squash preparation? I’m about to be buried in them from the garden. Sliced, lightly bread in cornmeal and fry? Sautéed with onions and some bacon grease?

Personally, both fried and sauteed is good but my favorite is stuffed - halve it, scoop out the insides with a spoon, sautee the guts with onions and garlic and celery and whatever seasonings you want then mix it with breadcrumbs and cheese. Rub the halved squash with olive oil (and celery salt and sage if you want), then put the filling in & over it and bake until the top is crispy. If you're not veggie then bacon and sausage are an awesome addition.

Crusty Nutsack
Apr 21, 2005

SUCK LASER, COPPERS

WHY BE A FATCAT WHEN YOU CAN BE A SMOKERAT?

COOL ZONE HERO, ASK ME ABOUT MY LIVESTREAMS




summer squash is great grilled in big flat planks. I think eating it (and zucchini) raw is overlooked too. I like it in marinated vegetable salads, pasta salads, and as a dipper for stuff like spinach dip.

Resting Lich Face
Feb 21, 2019


This case of an intraperitoneal zucchini is unusual, and does raise questions as to how hard one has to push a blunt vegetable to perforate the rectum.


Kaiser Schnitzel posted:

What’s everyone’s favorite baby yellow squash preparation? I’m about to be buried in them from the garden. Sliced, lightly bread in cornmeal and fry? Sautéed with onions and some bacon grease?

Curry. Not southern (well, south India maybe) but a good use regardless.

mediaphage
Mar 22, 2007

Excuse me, pardon me, sheer perfection coming through


Resting Lich Face posted:

Curry. Not southern (well, south India maybe) but a good use regardless.

Au contraire!

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Country_Captain

I mean, yeah it's clearly Indian, but there are regions of the south that got into it.

Croatoan
Jun 24, 2005

I am inevitable.
ROBBLE GROBBLE


My go to is sauteed in butter with onions but that'd get old after a few times. Roasted is good. Soup is good. Kebabs?

Croatoan fucked around with this message at 22:24 on May 21, 2020

TheKingslayer
Sep 3, 2008

There are no men like me. There's only me.





Pickle some of them squash.

mediaphage
Mar 22, 2007

Excuse me, pardon me, sheer perfection coming through


Croatoan posted:

My go to is sauteed in butter with onions but that'd get old after a few times. Roasted is good. Soup is good. Kebabs?

Chop 'em and add to succotash!

Resting Lich Face
Feb 21, 2019


This case of an intraperitoneal zucchini is unusual, and does raise questions as to how hard one has to push a blunt vegetable to perforate the rectum.


mediaphage posted:

Au contraire!

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Country_Captain

I mean, yeah it's clearly Indian, but there are regions of the south that got into it.

No way! That's neat.

THE MACHO MAN
Nov 15, 2007

...Carey...

draw me like one of your French Canadian girls


mediaphage posted:

Au contraire!

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Country_Captain

I mean, yeah it's clearly Indian, but there are regions of the south that got into it.

I love learning about random stuff like this

Kaiser Schnitzel
Mar 28, 2006

Schnitzel mit uns




THE MACHO MAN posted:

I love learning about random stuff like this

I have a big half green, half yellow/red tomato that fell off the plant before it really got ripe. Can I still make fried green tomatoes or will it be too watery/mushy?

mediaphage
Mar 22, 2007

Excuse me, pardon me, sheer perfection coming through


Kaiser Schnitzel posted:

I have a big half green, half yellow/red tomato that fell off the plant before it really got ripe. Can I still make fried green tomatoes or will it be too watery/mushy?

You tell us, how soft are your tomatoes

Croatoan
Jun 24, 2005

I am inevitable.
ROBBLE GROBBLE


mediaphage posted:

You tell us, how soft are your tomatoes
This is actually pretty true. It won't be as tart but feel it, if it's soft no way. It could still be watery even if it's firm but that's more dependent on the variety of tomato.


That reminds me, if you want fried green tomatoes in the fall and winter, fried tomatillos are really drat good. Meatier too. They're just smaller is all.

Croatoan fucked around with this message at 16:30 on May 23, 2020

Resting Lich Face
Feb 21, 2019


This case of an intraperitoneal zucchini is unusual, and does raise questions as to how hard one has to push a blunt vegetable to perforate the rectum.


Croatoan posted:

That reminds me, if you want fried green tomatoes in the fall and winter, fried tomatillos are really drat good. Meatier too. They're just smaller is all.

Frankly just forget the tomatoes altogether.

empty sea
Jul 17, 2011

gonna saddle my seahorse and float out to the sunset

I. M. Gei posted:

I wish I liked grits.

Every time I’ve ever had them they’re just bland and gritty and nasty, like eating cream of kitty litter soup or some poo poo, but maybe those were all just lovely grits? I’m thinking they’re not supposed to taste like that.

I feel you. I mostly had grits from Cracker Barrel as a kid and they were awful. Just bland and blah. The only time I had good grits was as an adult from a Creole restaurant and they were cooked fine and just doused in butter and seasonings and cheese.

Grits with proper seasoning and cheese are loving fantastic, like mashed potatoes but better. Just, so good. Grits without a fuckton of seasonings and cheese and butter or fats are horrible.

Notahippie
Feb 4, 2003

Kids, it's not cool to have Shane MacGowan teeth

empty sea posted:

I feel you. I mostly had grits from Cracker Barrel as a kid and they were awful. Just bland and blah. The only time I had good grits was as an adult from a Creole restaurant and they were cooked fine and just doused in butter and seasonings and cheese.

Grits with proper seasoning and cheese are loving fantastic, like mashed potatoes but better. Just, so good. Grits without a fuckton of seasonings and cheese and butter or fats are horrible.

I made some killer grits this weekend with some locally ground corn from a hipster bakery that has set up a 100 year old milling machine and is milling grain directly. Other than the inch-long wood splinter, presumably from the 100 year old machine, they were awesome. I made about two cups, and added two pressed garlic cloves, some salt and butter, and about a half cup of shredded cheese directly to the pot and that was enough to give them a great depth of flavor.

Kaiser Schnitzel
Mar 28, 2006

Schnitzel mit uns




I think it's gonna be fried green tomatoes, bby squash, and maybe some frozen peas or turnip greens tomorrow night. Maybe some biscuits too. It's been forever since I did fried green tomatoes-what's a good technique/recipe? I think I used to dredge in flour, then buttermilk, then cornbread mix and fry, but I can't remember?

ThePopeOfFun
Feb 15, 2010


Doom Rooster posted:

Hey there southern food goons. I'm about to start development on a biscuits and gravy recipe and was hoping to get y'all's opinions before I get started. I'll be doing plenty of experimenting and can end up answering most of these, but would love a head start with advice from some goons.

Biscuits. For biscuits and gravy, is the buttermilk biscuit still king even for this application? I imagine that I'll end up with some butter content still, but we have a pretty good supply of lard, and an absolutely overwhelming amount of tallow, so going to need to use a good bit of both. Current thinking is to use lard for the gravy roux, and tallow/butter for the biscuits. Any thoughts?

I'm going to try out a low protein flour like White Lilly. "Northern" biscuits don't taste the same, because most flour up here has higher protein. Probably worth your time.

I throw an acid in everything, and I'd throw it in gravy, too. Not enough to pick it out. You could do lemon, vinegar, buttermilk. I guess your biscuits could have it if you went with buttermilk. I just hate boring gravy.

Something funky like white pepper cause why not.

I'm thinking the next time I make gravy I'll try to sneak some mushrooms. Maybe sautee bellas in sausage fat and puree?

mediaphage
Mar 22, 2007

Excuse me, pardon me, sheer perfection coming through


ThePopeOfFun posted:

I'm going to try out a low protein flour like White Lilly. "Northern" biscuits don't taste the same, because most flour up here has higher protein. Probably worth your time.

I throw an acid in everything, and I'd throw it in gravy, too. Not enough to pick it out. You could do lemon, vinegar, buttermilk. I guess your biscuits could have it if you went with buttermilk. I just hate boring gravy.

Something funky like white pepper cause why not.

I'm thinking the next time I make gravy I'll try to sneak some mushrooms. Maybe sautee bellas in sausage fat and puree?

If you don’t overwork your dough you really don’t need to track down white lily. I use canadian AP flours (and also whole wheat, even), which are stronger than most US flours, to make my biscuits and they always turn out great.

Not that into the idea of lemon in my sausage gravy but you do you

Croatoan
Jun 24, 2005

I am inevitable.
ROBBLE GROBBLE


Kaiser Schnitzel posted:

I think it's gonna be fried green tomatoes, bby squash, and maybe some frozen peas or turnip greens tomorrow night. Maybe some biscuits too. It's been forever since I did fried green tomatoes-what's a good technique/recipe? I think I used to dredge in flour, then buttermilk, then cornbread mix and fry, but I can't remember?

That's basically what I do. You can sub panko for cornmeal for extra crunch but I don't always have panko so I usually go traditional. I also add a little garlic powder and maybe cayenne but a lot of folks make a dipping sauce and add that there instead. They're pretty easy and versatile. Try the tomatillos!

Edit: wait, you said cornbread mix. Do you mean Jiffy? I've never done that but I guess it'd be ok but way less crunchy than I like. If you want to use a box of Jiffy just make hoecakes.

Croatoan fucked around with this message at 11:18 on May 27, 2020

ThePopeOfFun
Feb 15, 2010


mediaphage posted:

If you don’t overwork your dough you really don’t need to track down white lily. I use canadian AP flours (and also whole wheat, even), which are stronger than most US flours, to make my biscuits and they always turn out great.

Not that into the idea of lemon in my sausage gravy but you do you

We're not making lemon gravy, lmao. If you didn't know it was there you'd never guess. Just enough to tell your tongue "sour" without adding flavor.

I'll have to try out the different flours. I'm pretty convinced a lower protein flour is going to make a difference, even after accounting for technique. Whether that difference is better or not dunno

Kaiser Schnitzel
Mar 28, 2006

Schnitzel mit uns




Croatoan posted:

Edit: wait, you said cornbread mix. Do you mean Jiffy? I've never done that but I guess it'd be ok but way less crunchy than I like. If you want to use a box of Jiffy just make hoecakes.

There has never been any Jiffy in my house Martha white cornbread mix-it's mostly just flour and cornmeal with leaveners. I'd use real cornmeal but I don't have any and don't feel like braving the store. Panko is a good idea, and I think I have some so I may try that.

Croatoan
Jun 24, 2005

I am inevitable.
ROBBLE GROBBLE


Man don't dis Jiffy. That poo poo is awesome for zero effort hoecakes for real.

Kaiser Schnitzel
Mar 28, 2006

Schnitzel mit uns




I actually love Jiffy it just fills a niche in my mind called 'sweet corn muffin/cake' not the one called 'cornbread' because I grew up on salty, savory, crispy, unsweet cornbread.

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mediaphage
Mar 22, 2007

Excuse me, pardon me, sheer perfection coming through


ThePopeOfFun posted:

We're not making lemon gravy, lmao. If you didn't know it was there you'd never guess. Just enough to tell your tongue "sour" without adding flavor.

I'll have to try out the different flours. I'm pretty convinced a lower protein flour is going to make a difference, even after accounting for technique. Whether that difference is better or not dunno

If there's enough to "tell your tongue sour" there's enough to taste, as thats how tastes work. I get what you're going after, I just disagree. Sometimes roux-gravies taste too sweet because people add too much flour but I'd rather add less flour than correct with acid.

You might find a difference with the flours, I just think it's funny how many people make terrible biscuits and then go on the internet and write blogs about "Oh well, I didn't have any White Lily, that explains it!"

Which I'm not necessarily saying you're doing, but it's very much a thing

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