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Milo and POTUS
Sep 3, 2017

I will not shut up about the Mighty Morphin Power Rangers. I talk about them all the time and work them into every conversation I have. I built a shrine in my room for the yellow one who died because sadly no one noticed because she died around 9/11. Wanna see it?


Dog_Meat posted:

Whatever happened to UFO hysteria anyway? One day people just suddenly stopped caring. I know camera phones killed most things like this and I guess the fact that we can now buy drones that "move like nothing I ever saw in the sky" popped the alien tech bubble, but we just don't hear from people saying they got probed anymore

It got subsumed by far right wing conspiratoria

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NikkolasKing
Apr 3, 2010





Mulder was sure quick to believe it was the real Samantha at the start of Season 5. He's only seen two fakes at this point, more if you count all the clone hybrids he saw the first time.

oh but seriously I
Sep 26, 2019

Do you ever wonder if there are other planets out there
(source)

NikkolasKing posted:

Mulder was sure quick to believe it was the real Samantha at the start of Season 5. He's only seen two fakes at this point, more if you count all the clone hybrids he saw the first time.

God that poo poo never went anywhere, did it?

NikkolasKing
Apr 3, 2010





oh but seriously I posted:

God that poo poo never went anywhere, did it?

I have no idea. I got a few more seasons and 2 movies to watch before I can say.

crispix
Mar 28, 2015

Oh globbits


X-Files was a great show for its day but it dragged on a couple of seasons past its best and did not age well at all. I prefer to pretend the film didn't happen let alone anything after that.

Also

oh but seriously I
Sep 26, 2019

Do you ever wonder if there are other planets out there
(source)


Doodlydoodlydoodlydoodly

oh but seriously I
Sep 26, 2019

Do you ever wonder if there are other planets out there
(source)

I bought the X-Files soundtrack, but years after the fact at a much reduced price

Milo and POTUS
Sep 3, 2017

I will not shut up about the Mighty Morphin Power Rangers. I talk about them all the time and work them into every conversation I have. I built a shrine in my room for the yellow one who died because sadly no one noticed because she died around 9/11. Wanna see it?


I think it's aged great in some respects. Technically the show usually looks good to great. At the very worst it's usually serviceable, anything CGI notwithstanding. The things that have aged worst seem more cultural. ie the conspiracy theorist of the day not being a complete nutcase who talks about pizza pedophiles with religious fervor.

Back when it was on Netflix you'd be surprised at how many young people would watch it. Or at least I was

piratepilates
Mar 28, 2004

So I will learn to live with it. Because I can live with it. I can live with it.





The production and the writing are top notch and still some of the best in television. Completely holds up and the only parts that feel aged are parts related to the period.

The uh, mytharc and such, Chrissy boy really should have cut those loose at some point. If the show miraculously comes back he should definitely not keep trying to keep the mytharc going in some kind of sunk cost frenzy.

NikkolasKing
Apr 3, 2010





As somebody who has never seen a single episode of either Twin Peaks series, what do you think of it compared to X-Files? One paper I read cited the original X-File series succeeding where Twin Peaks failed because it never lost the realistic foundation. The paper claims Twin Peaks in its second season just became too surreal or experimental and that doomed it the kind of fame and success the X-Files had.

I'm not sure how their two revival series compare, though.

Then again, with how much everyone hates Season 8 and 9 and the second movie, maybe the newer X-Files series helped the franchise go out on a better note?

Yannick_B
Oct 11, 2007


A lot of the mytharc truly rules but it's really easy to judge it now, in an era where show can be super-serialized or get to decide to have limited runs.
One of the biggest problems the X-Files have, it's that the show is at it's most exciting when the characters are *glimpsing* the greater part of a whole.

When it came down to the alien conspiracy stuff, when they did solve it (or tried to solve most of it in season 6) it just ran contrary to the show's strengths.
Having someone in a room tell Mulder "the aliens are this, the conspiracy does that and the invasion will work this way" just deflates how the show works.

Milo and POTUS
Sep 3, 2017

I will not shut up about the Mighty Morphin Power Rangers. I talk about them all the time and work them into every conversation I have. I built a shrine in my room for the yellow one who died because sadly no one noticed because she died around 9/11. Wanna see it?


8 and 9 do have one bright spot. Agent Doggett owns. Shame about reyes though. I guess she's fine?

e: a disclaimer: I have not bothered to sit down and watch all of these seasons. This is just my opinion based on a few random motw I caught

NikkolasKing
Apr 3, 2010





To me, the Mytharc is good not just because I find the plot interesting but also because those episodes have the big moments for Mulder and Scully. You undoubtedly get good characterization of them in even MOTW episodes but take where I'm at in Season Scully has - had - a daughter. This was a huge moment for Scully and very powerful, I thought. You just don't get this level of suspense or emotion in a MOTW episode. As Yannick_B it's really great to see Mulder and Scully close in on hat ever elusive Truth and while they are doing that they are having great personal triumphs and defeats. The X-Files would be nothing without Mulder and Scully.

(I did have to stop reading the second part of your post though since it seems like you were venturing into spoiler territory, if only hinted at spoilers)

NikkolasKing
Apr 3, 2010





Also I'm still not sure why it's so hard to find people to talk about The X-Files. I used to post on a scifi forum and they got me to watch Stargate SG-1. It was...okay but nothing special. I have no desire to ever see it again and I wouldn't recommend it to anyone. So why were people still talking about it ten years ago? And i think there's an active thread for it here, too.

This in contrast to The X-Files which is not only a great show but possibly the most influential scifi show of the last 30 years. It certainly has to be up there. But nobody talks about it. Babylon 5, Stargate, Farscape, they talk about these but not a show so much bigger than any of them.

And no disrespect to B5. I need to watch that myself someday.

NikkolasKing fucked around with this message at 13:50 on Apr 25, 2020

Milo and POTUS
Sep 3, 2017

I will not shut up about the Mighty Morphin Power Rangers. I talk about them all the time and work them into every conversation I have. I built a shrine in my room for the yellow one who died because sadly no one noticed because she died around 9/11. Wanna see it?


Mytharcs tend to be bad compared to motw really. You still get M&S plus you get CSM, Skinner, Mr X, deepthroat, Krycek. I don't know. It's still not terrible. Usually.

grassy gnoll
Aug 27, 2006

The pawsting business is tough work.

NikkolasKing posted:

Also I'm still not sure why it's so hard to find people to talk about The X-Files. I used to post on a scifi forum and they got me to watch Stargate SG-1. It was...okay but nothing special. I have no desire to ever see it again and I wouldn't recommend it to anyone. So why were people still talking about it ten years ago? And i think there's an active thread for it here, too.

This in contrast to The X-Files which is not only a great show but possibly the most influential scifi show of the last 30 years. It certainly has to be up there. But nobody talks about it. Babylon 5, Stargate, Farscape, they talk about these but not a show so much bigger than any of them.

And no disrespect to B5. I need to watch that myself someday.

I think it's a two-part problem between exposure and how the show ended.

X-Files was real big back in the day, and absurdly huge by today's standards of ratings. It's absolutely the progenitor of modern sci-fi television, and it was one of the first serial-ish prestige shows of the modern era. That also means you don't have the same evangelist fanbase you do for your Fireflys and Stargates.

Unlike a lot of sci-fi media, X-files didn't have to fight against cancellation in anywhere near the same ways. There's no sense of what might have been - we saw exactly what was coming, and it was bad and lasted way longer than it should have. There's less wistful mystique and more looking at your watch and wondering when you'll finally be free of this whole thing.

joepinetree
Apr 5, 2012


NikkolasKing posted:

Also I'm still not sure why it's so hard to find people to talk about The X-Files. I used to post on a scifi forum and they got me to watch Stargate SG-1. It was...okay but nothing special. I have no desire to ever see it again and I wouldn't recommend it to anyone. So why were people still talking about it ten years ago? And i think there's an active thread for it here, too.

This in contrast to The X-Files which is not only a great show but possibly the most influential scifi show of the last 30 years. It certainly has to be up there. But nobody talks about it. Babylon 5, Stargate, Farscape, they talk about these but not a show so much bigger than any of them.

And no disrespect to B5. I need to watch that myself someday.

Funny thing: what got me to sign up for SA was one of the old xfiles threads that was doing a rewatch of the series. There used to be a ton of x files forums, but eventually they all died off.

I think it was just a matter of a show overstaying its welcome. As someone old enough to have caught the original run, a lot of people I knew who were super into the show in the mid 90s all would react with "that show is still going on? huh" when it got to 2001-2002.

At some point, people just burn out of all build up no payoff.

crispix
Mar 28, 2015

Oh globbits


joepinetree posted:

I think it was just a matter of a show overstaying its welcome. As someone old enough to have caught the original run, a lot of people I knew who were super into the show in the mid 90s all would react with "that show is still going on? huh" when it got to 2001-2002.

At some point, people just burn out of all build up no payoff.

This became a real problem in the 00s imo. Shows would start out great and have a couple of good seasons but then the writing would get over encumbered with intrigue sometimes to the point where the writers themselves couldn't resolve plot lines convincingly and only attempted to after many had lost interest anyway

joepinetree
Apr 5, 2012


crispix posted:

This became a real problem in the 00s imo. Shows would start out great and have a couple of good seasons but then the writing would get over encumbered with intrigue sometimes to the point where the writers themselves couldn't resolve plot lines convincingly and only attempted to after many had lost interest anyway

When series were still a network affair and producers couldn't rely on subscription fees, the main way the TV business operated was that networks would spend less than cost for TV shows and production companies would only turn a profit if they made it into syndication. With the X Files, it was worse because fox had a couple of seasons where all their new shows flopped. I don't remember if it was carter or spotnitz who said at the end of season 7 that they still didn't know if there was going to be a season 8 so they filmed two endings.

Gilligan was asked about the show staying too long and his basic take was that some 200 people are employed on a show that size, and that ending the show at the artistically satisfying time also meant 200 of your friends losing their jobs.

Payndz
Sep 22, 2006

They smelled of pubs, and Wormwood Scrubs, and too many right-wing meetings.

So I twatted them with a magic yo-yo. Because, hell, why not?


Totally expected to see Dickbutt there.

'Our Town' (I think season 2?) is one of those episodes that nobody ever remembers and which doesn't trouble any of the usual 'best of' lists, but I loving love it. Mulder offers up the usual paranormal explanations, but nope, it's cannibal cultists with CJD, led by a demented Colonel Sanders.

To me, the show finally went from appointment viewing to "okay, they're scraping the barrel now" with the super-soldiers arc. Things were already teetering, but that knocked it over the cliff.

NikkolasKing
Apr 3, 2010





Thanks for the replies everyone.

perhaps you can also offer some more of your knowledge of TV writing. I mentioned earlier one of the reasons I like the Mytharc is because of its big Muldr and Scully moments. However there is a definite incongruity between them and MOTW episodes. For example, Scully just found and lost her daughter in Season 5. Then...we continue on with adventuring like nothing happened. Time and time again in the Mythology episodes some earth-shattering event happens to our heroes but we go straight back to trundling along looking for random mysteries.

I'm told the X-Files was on the cusp of more modern television writing and that the kind of consistent character development I want from the show was actually rare or unheard of before the X-Files. The X-Files in a lot of ways started more focused television with consistent character development and narratives. Is this true?

It would match up with how people have told me, when I've considered watching Star Trek, that I can just skip around and watch whatever because TOS and TNG are almost entirely episodic.

Open Source Idiom
Jan 4, 2013


NikkolasKing posted:

I'm told the X-Files was on the cusp of more modern television writing and that the kind of consistent character development I want from the show was actually rare or unheard of before the X-Files. The X-Files in a lot of ways started more focused television with consistent character development and narratives. Is this true?

Incoming effortpost:

It certainly was a part of that trend, but there were other shows at or around the same time that were just as, if not more, serialised. Xena, oddly enough, featured far more serialisation than a lot of the X-Files, and aired around about the same time. Cracker was another show, though that came out of Britain. And then, of course, there was Doctor Who, which would tell weekly serialised stories lasting months. Some arcs were up to three or four months long.

Classically, however, there was a strong division between the commercial impulse for repetitive, safely produced product (and the perceived ability for a serialised show to pick up new viewers) and the desire from creatives and audience members to see stories that were highly serialised. Different shows solved this in different ways -- "previously on" recaps being the most successful long term solution, though the binge release format also ended up being quite popular haha -- and the X-Files handled it by aggressively demarcating the serialised material (its "myth arc") from its non serialised material (the "monsters of the week"). Effectively, serialised elements were only a problem in certain episodes, and the actual carry over between the multi-episode arcs was minimal. In practice this led to audience frustration and a perception that the show was disorganised, fragmented and repetitive, but it also led to higher ratings and easier onboarding for new viewers.

Compare it with Xena, which segmented its multi episode arcs into largely stand alone tales. It would usually feature the heroes teaming up after a long absence at the start of every episode -- even if those episodes were the second half of a two-parter -- and feature short, in character recaps in nearly every episode until it was absolutely certain that its audience understood the premise of the show. It, like many other shows around then (Alias, Farscape, Babylon 5, Buffy) also used its credit sequences to explain the basic premise of the show just so that audience members definitely understood what the gently caress was going on in any given week.

On the other hand, shows like Doctor Who and Cracker would extend this anthology approach to serialised stories. Every story was part of a multi-episode arc, but each arc would wrap up with a clear delineation between it and the next. Cracker was more aggressive about changing its status quo between episodes -- regular cast had a habit of dying suddenly, for instance -- but it also limited its arc theatrics to either the tried and true serialisation of the soap opera, or ameliorated the overall effect by sticking to shorter seasons.

You can see this anthology approach mirrored by a lot of shows even now -- Mad Men, Girls, Outlander, Clone Wars and pretty much any Damon Lindelof show (Lost, Watchmen, The Leftovers) all marry ongoing arc concerns with individual, character driven short stories. The Xena/Buffy/Farscape approach, though, is slowly falling by the wayside, and pretty much only exists on Agents Of SHIELD and some CW shows. I think that's a shame, as it's a personal favourite. Obviously it only existed as a compromise between creatives and executives and their different needs from a certain kind of product, but I think it also encouraged discipline and creativity, and built a certain kind of relationship with television that reflected the best qualities of pulp fiction. But that's both pretentious and precious of me, and I can't really pretend I have a leg to stand on there.

But ultimately, it's all basically derived from the soap opera, the hyper serialised and hyper trashy ghost haunting all serialised television.

joepinetree
Apr 5, 2012


NikkolasKing posted:

Thanks for the replies everyone.

perhaps you can also offer some more of your knowledge of TV writing. I mentioned earlier one of the reasons I like the Mytharc is because of its big Muldr and Scully moments. However there is a definite incongruity between them and MOTW episodes. For example, Scully just found and lost her daughter in Season 5. Then...we continue on with adventuring like nothing happened. Time and time again in the Mythology episodes some earth-shattering event happens to our heroes but we go straight back to trundling along looking for random mysteries.

I'm told the X-Files was on the cusp of more modern television writing and that the kind of consistent character development I want from the show was actually rare or unheard of before the X-Files. The X-Files in a lot of ways started more focused television with consistent character development and narratives. Is this true?

It would match up with how people have told me, when I've considered watching Star Trek, that I can just skip around and watch whatever because TOS and TNG are almost entirely episodic.

The incongruity between mytharc and motw is explained in large part because the writers for each were different. Early on, other writers like Morgan and Wong would contribute episodes to the mytharc, but after season 6 or so it becomes exclusively a chris carter thing.
Meanwhile some writers focused only on MOTW episodes. These writers include Vince Gilligan, Darin Morgan, Howard Gordon, John Shiban, etc.

Milo and POTUS
Sep 3, 2017

I will not shut up about the Mighty Morphin Power Rangers. I talk about them all the time and work them into every conversation I have. I built a shrine in my room for the yellow one who died because sadly no one noticed because she died around 9/11. Wanna see it?


Payndz posted:

'Our Town' (I think season 2?) is one of those episodes that nobody ever remembers and which doesn't trouble any of the usual 'best of' lists, but I loving love it. Mulder offers up the usual paranormal explanations, but nope, it's cannibal cultists with CJD, led by a demented Colonel Sanders.

This episode was great I thought. And it did have immortality!

precision
May 7, 2006

Gonna have me some good friends around
Gonna have me some good times in town




"Bad Blood" and "X-COPS" are such good eps

Two Owls
Sep 17, 2016

Yeah, count me in



NikkolasKing posted:

Also I'm still not sure why it's so hard to find people to talk about The X-Files.

In Britain, I remember there being the overhype-and-inevitable-backlash problem that probably left everyone sour about it.

Seriously, the X-Files was massive over here. "Fire" being used as part of a theme night because it was 'too scary' to go out in its usual slot (and not because it was a bit crap and everyone would take the piss out of the accents)! The whole conspiracy thing taking off so much MIB's took over from Tharg in 2000AD (shut up, it was a big deal)! Massive sleeper hit that was switched from BBC2 to BBC1 when they noticed how popular it was! Etc, etc. Have a trailer.

And then it seemed to switch to BBC1 at the exact point when it became clear the overall conspiracy plot didn't know where it was going and the whole thing just seemed to fall apart. I don't think I've ever seen much past season 4, and this is someone who'd gone on trips with schoolmates almost solely so we could buy the VHS of the resolution of the season 2 cliffhanger.

Yannick_B
Oct 11, 2007


joepinetree posted:

The incongruity between mytharc and motw is explained in large part because the writers for each were different. Early on, other writers like Morgan and Wong would contribute episodes to the mytharc, but after season 6 or so it becomes exclusively a chris carter thing.
Meanwhile some writers focused only on MOTW episodes. These writers include Vince Gilligan, Darin Morgan, Howard Gordon, John Shiban, etc.

It's also because, (for great reasons) Chris Carter and co recognized the elasticity of the X-Files concept and ran with it. The X-FIles world has both aliens and ghosts in it. Most shows now
would pick a lane between those two. But because the playing field of the X-Files was so wide, it's storytelling could be as well.

Back in the day, I would say it was more frustrating to have Scully mostly hit a "skepticism reset button" every episode, especially since her skepticism could've evolved into rigorous fact-checking.

EDIT: Has anyone checked out EVIL on CBS? I've seen the first three episodes and it feels like a pretty well-thought-out X-Files progeny, but with it's own flavor and modern way of being told.

Jerusalem
May 20, 2004

Would you be my new best friends?


Yannick_B posted:

It's also because, (for great reasons) Chris Carter and co recognized the elasticity of the X-Files concept and ran with it. The X-FIles world has both aliens and ghosts in it. Most shows now would pick a lane between those two. But because the playing field of the X-Files was so wide, it's storytelling could be as well.

This reminds me, I'm positive there was an episode with an alien... ghost! I'm scared to go back and look it up/rewatch it because it might be awful, but I'm just so tickled pink by the concept of some writer going,"gently caress it I'm doing both!"

My vague recollection is that it was an astronaut who was possessed (or at least believed he was) by the ghost of an alien he picked up while in space or something.

NikkolasKing
Apr 3, 2010





Mulder's arc in S5 has been interesting. My criticisms of how it was done aside, his losing faith in the alien idea and becoming a jaded cynic about the government was an unexpected development in his character.

I also find it interesting that the man who is characterized by "I'll believe anything" is so militantly skeptical about any mention of the Divine or divine actions. Ghosts, reincarnation and even demons but no God. On its own that isn't anything too special - many religions don't believe in a God but holds to one or even all of those other beliefs. But as S5 Mulder recognizes and bitterly quips about, he's the guy everyone comes to at every Bigfoot sighting or when they see Jesus face in a tortilla. But he will not believe in God or angels. He and Scully always reverse roles in these episodes, at least outside of that early series episode with the faith healer.

Almost done with Season 5 and then onto the first movie.

Jerusalem posted:

This reminds me, I'm positive there was an episode with an alien... ghost! I'm scared to go back and look it up/rewatch it because it might be awful, but I'm just so tickled pink by the concept of some writer going,"gently caress it I'm doing both!"

My vague recollection is that it was an astronaut who was possessed (or at least believed he was) by the ghost of an alien he picked up while in space or something.

https://x-files.fandom.com/wiki/Space

Thank you for reminding me of another weird alien type that is clearly not the Colonists I don't think.

Yannick_B
Oct 11, 2007


Jerusalem posted:

This reminds me, I'm positive there was an episode with an alien... ghost! I'm scared to go back and look it up/rewatch it because it might be awful, but I'm just so tickled pink by the concept of some writer going,"gently caress it I'm doing both!"

My vague recollection is that it was an astronaut who was possessed (or at least believed he was) by the ghost of an alien he picked up while in space or something.

it was called Space and it was in season 1! The ghost was linked...to the face on Mars?

Quote-Unquote
Oct 21, 2002



oh but seriously I posted:

I bought the X-Files soundtrack, but years after the fact at a much reduced price

Is that 'Songs in the Key of X'?

If so, find a cd player with a rewind function (do they still make these?) and hold rewind at the start of track one until it won't go further.

There's an absolutely incredible hidden track by Nick Cave and the Bad Seeds.

NikkolasKing
Apr 3, 2010





So the final episode of Season 5 was called The End. I thought that, considering the movie was coming up and some previous Mytharc episodes, that this might mean the Colonization plan was gonna be happening.

Boy was I wrong. No grand climax, just the most downer of finale's. The X-Files was shut down once before but it wasn't totally destroyed. Who would have thought a cramped room in the basement where Skinner thought they kept the copier going up in flames would be one of the most heartwrenching moments in the series. But of course it's what it represents that is the real blow. The truth was literally burned to the ground - a lifetime of work gathered through blood, sweat and tears is all gone. It hurt them both but I can't help but feel like it's Mulder who suffers most here. This was always his crusade and the man has no other life. Scully has her family but Mulder has nothing but that crusade. And it's all gone.

Of course I felt so sorry for Scully and Emily but this is the symbolic and literal obliteration of everything our heroes and we as the audience have been pursuing.

Season 5 might be my favorite season on the whole. I dunno, it would take a long time to gather my thoughts on so many episodes. But for now, I can say for certain that I haven't been hit this hard by anything else all series. This season has made me laugh and cry in abundance.

NikkolasKing fucked around with this message at 15:13 on Apr 26, 2020

Milo and POTUS
Sep 3, 2017

I will not shut up about the Mighty Morphin Power Rangers. I talk about them all the time and work them into every conversation I have. I built a shrine in my room for the yellow one who died because sadly no one noticed because she died around 9/11. Wanna see it?


Yannick_B posted:

EDIT: Has anyone checked out EVIL on CBS? I've seen the first three episodes and it feels like a pretty well-thought-out X-Files progeny, but with it's own flavor and modern way of being told.

Ive seen about half the episodes I think. I think it's great for what it is. It's cheesy fun and I love all the leads

False
Oct 6, 2003
i have friends who will pull magazine models wearing headphones off of trains without even speaking the same language as them. Friends who will show up in a town after hitchhiking cross country for 3 days without showering and pull two girls working

Anyone found a good "rewatch" guide they can recommend?

I'm wandering through the early seasons watching episodes that sound interesting, that I have fond memories of, or that are in common top 10 lists at the moment (Goddamn, I forgot how many episodes are in a season).

On the whole I'm enjoying it but it is striking how crude and theatrical the early episodes are. I get that its a foundational show for mondern TV but you really need to suspend disbelief - especially re. realism and character motivations. Mulder is a total lunatic who should be loosing his job about 3 times an episode and 80% of his character motivations can be summed up as "the writers need to emphasize that this is spooky or unusual" and Scully seems to get hit in the head with a coconut every 2-3 episodes.

Still - absolutely loving it. Just so many fond memories from growing up - my parents even got The Lone Gunmen on DVD (after the VHS recording stopped working) so we can watch it when I visit.

Shrimp or Shrimps
Feb 14, 2012




NikkolasKing posted:

So the final episode of Season 5 was called The End. I thought that, considering the movie was coming up and some previous Mytharc episodes, that this might mean the Colonization plan was gonna be happening.

Boy was I wrong. No grand climax, just the most downer of finale's. The X-Files was shut down once before but it wasn't totally destroyed. Who would have thought a cramped room in the basement where Skinner thought they kept the copier going up in flames would be one of the most heartwrenching moments in the series. But of course it's what it represents that is the real blow. The truth was literally burned to the ground - a lifetime of work gathered through blood, sweat and tears is all gone. It hurt them both but I can't help but feel like it's Mulder who suffers most here. This was always his crusade and the man has no other life. Scully has her family but Mulder has nothing but that crusade. And it's all gone.

Of course I felt so sorry for Scully and Emily but this is the symbolic and literal obliteration of everything our heroes and we as the audience have been pursuing.

Season 5 might be my favorite season on the whole. I dunno, it would take a long time to gather my thoughts on so many episodes. But for now, I can say for certain that I haven't been hit this hard by anything else all series. This season has made me laugh and cry in abundance.

When I do my rewatches, I typically finish at season 5 plus the first film, Fight the Future.

S5 is very memorable.

NikkolasKing
Apr 3, 2010





I gotta say, I didn't expect "Dreamland" to get 2 parts. I figured it was just another joke episode, especially given it was following on Triangle. Triangle was the ultimate troll, they gave us the Mulder-Scully kiss except it wasn't really Scully and also it was all possibly a dream.

I knew I recognized Fletcher from somewhere, though. He's the guy from Short Circuit 2.

And speaking of actors, the one "British" sailor from Triangle sounded exactly like Kano from the first Mortal Kombat movie and he was Australian. I mean, I guess they both say "mate" and "bloody" so what's the difference.

Having just finished The Rain King which is episode 8 of Season 6, Season 6 has been the weirdest season yet. Everything apart from the first episode has been comedic and light-hearted.

Shrimp or Shrimps posted:

When I do my rewatches, I typically finish at season 5 plus the first film, Fight the Future.

S5 is very memorable.

It was indeed very good and so was the movie.

If I have one criticism of S5, it's that it introduced Agent Spender who is a weasel so weaselly that Krycek looks a saint compared to him. I thought he would be dead and done with straight away but he's sticking around, apparently.

NikkolasKing fucked around with this message at 14:37 on Apr 28, 2020

joepinetree
Apr 5, 2012


False posted:

Anyone found a good "rewatch" guide they can recommend?

I'm wandering through the early seasons watching episodes that sound interesting, that I have fond memories of, or that are in common top 10 lists at the moment (Goddamn, I forgot how many episodes are in a season).

On the whole I'm enjoying it but it is striking how crude and theatrical the early episodes are. I get that its a foundational show for mondern TV but you really need to suspend disbelief - especially re. realism and character motivations. Mulder is a total lunatic who should be loosing his job about 3 times an episode and 80% of his character motivations can be summed up as "the writers need to emphasize that this is spooky or unusual" and Scully seems to get hit in the head with a coconut every 2-3 episodes.

Still - absolutely loving it. Just so many fond memories from growing up - my parents even got The Lone Gunmen on DVD (after the VHS recording stopped working) so we can watch it when I visit.

depends on the type of rewatch you want to do. Mytharc or MOTW?

Timby
Dec 23, 2006

Your mother!



NikkolasKing posted:

I'm told the X-Files was on the cusp of more modern television writing and that the kind of consistent character development I want from the show was actually rare or unheard of before the X-Files. The X-Files in a lot of ways started more focused television with consistent character development and narratives. Is this true?

This is wildly off-base and, honestly, whoever told you that was demonstrating a genuine lack of knowledge in television history. Homicide: Life on the Street was doing that while The X-Files was still in its infancy, and Babylon 5 and Deep Space Nine were right around the corner. Going farther back, Hill Street Blues and L.A. Law were doing lots of serialized stuff in the '80s, and you can't ignore the 800-pound gorilla in the room, Dallas.

False
Oct 6, 2003
i have friends who will pull magazine models wearing headphones off of trains without even speaking the same language as them. Friends who will show up in a town after hitchhiking cross country for 3 days without showering and pull two girls working

joepinetree posted:

depends on the type of rewatch you want to do. Mytharc or MOTW?

Both, really. I enjoy reading about why other people enjoy things before I enjoy them (and it helps to avoid the waste of time episodes).

Also: I just re-watched S1, episode 1 and contrary to what I said about early seasons being pretty hoaky - it was really great. Great set-ups, back-story, intrigue, and characterization.

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piratepilates
Mar 28, 2004

So I will learn to live with it. Because I can live with it. I can live with it.





I watched my first post-Duchovny episode today -- season 9's Sunshine Days.

The guy from Lost owns a one story house in Van Nuys. The kid from married with children all growed up breaks in at night, and it's somehow the exact house from the Brady Bunch (a multi-level set in a soundstage). Turns out he's making this happen with his mind.

It's very unsettling seeing the show but without Duchovny (and mostly without scully, she's a supporting character). The show still has the trappings of the one I know (the music, the look and feel, the plot progression and writing) but it all feels very......off, because of Doggett and Reyes driving the action instead of the familiar leads. They just don't quite feel like the right characters for the show, Doggett has his own niche that works in place of mulder, but Reyes doesn't seem to have much going for her.

When Scully shows up the whole thing feels even weirder. I forgot she's still kinda in the show at this point, so my first impression was "huh they really went and got some redhead to play the autopsy part when scully used to do it" before realizing that no, Scully is still in the show somehow.

The kid from Married With Children is in this, and I think it's the only time I've seen him cast in something outside of MWC. He's not particularly good.

The most hilarious part of the episode is that they keep talking about needing for the telekinetic guy to demonstrate his powers in public so they can prove that the paranormal is real, and the X-Files (Mulder's life work) isn't all for nothing. It really makes you aware of how dumb the premise of the show is after 9 years of the same thing. Paranormal happens, Mulder is believe, Scully is skeptic, by the end of the episode any proof is gone and only those two will know the truth. It's easy to look past normally since it's what happens in each episode that is the real draw, but man that whole illusion falls apart when they start treating that as an actual concept with actual sad implications.

The episode overall was alright but not great. You're really drawn in the first half of the idea of this guy just having a supernatural brady bunch house in his house, and somehow the characters from the brady bunch appear to be inside the house, but they really had nothing else going past that. The second half is just "yep this guy has telekinetic powers, brady bunch house is done by his mind, now he's dying, he always wish he had a real father, and the episode is over, everyone go home. Feels like a great one liner idea a writer had that they kept bringing up in meetings, but could never develop a real story out of.

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