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ulvir

in between norwegian books that may or may never get translated into english, Iím reading my way through In search of lost time. about 50% done with volume 3 now

itís really good, and itís funny how goony the narrator is.

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ulvir

beer pal posted:

im reading crying of lot 49 which ive heard is either his best or worst novel. an alternative position ive hard is that its somewhere in the middle.

itís decent enough but I think gravityís rainbow and even inherent vice are better

havenít read mason & dixon or V. yet

ulvir

gonna take a dive into the Cambridge introduction to literature and the environment

new national curriculum has introduced a few overarching topics that is to be included in every subject, amongst them sustainable development, so might as well get a better understanding of ecocriticism/-poetics before next school year

ulvir

me reading Rachel Carson once


ulvir

cda posted:

ecocriticism is wild, pun not intended, but seriously there are some extermely interesting and out there people writing in that field. do they got donna haraway in there?

all of it is written by James Clark, but Haraway is cited a whole bunch in there from glancing at the index

it has an entire chapter on post-humanism that Iím looking forward to

ulvir

Iím a dumbass, I meant Timothy Clark

not sure how James got in that post

ulvir

I love If on a winterís night

ulvir

beer pal posted:

hell ya. u read any other calvino? probably gonna pick up invisible cities before too long

invisible cities is pretty great and imaginative too, if you like that one I can also recommend Borges

ulvir

I'm reading strange hotel atm and its really good. she has a real phenomenological way of describing her being which is really intriguing, and the story is both unsettling and deeply drawing at the same time

ulvir

beer pal posted:

blindness was really good. i liked the writing style, sometimes i would go several pages without realizing it was all without a paragraph break. the dialogue all separated only by a capital letter after a comma, the whole book felt very fast paced

now im reading don quixote, often called the infinite jest of the early 17th century

saramago is great, you should also read Cain and The year of the death of ricardo reis

ulvir

I read it back when I was rather depressed several years ago, and it was strangely comforting in a weird way, maybe because it sort of hit the same notes that sad songs do when youíre a teenager?

ulvir

beer pal posted:

im reading mrs dalloway & loving it. she & tolstoy both do the thing very well of describing character's interiority, how they notice the tiny mannerisms of the people they're talking to and how they respond, how they perceive eachother & themselves, etc. and ofc the writing is gorgoeus

if you love these sort of things you should absolutely read proust

ulvir

just skimmed the summary a bit, but maybe you'll enjoy the name of the rose by umberto eco? it's like a crime mystery (and much more) but set in the mediveal times and the protagonist is a franciscan munk

ulvir

iím reading Death of Virgil atm, itís really good

ulvir

woolf owns

ulvir

as many people as humanly possible deserve the joy of experiencing Proust

ulvir

im reading to the lighthouse, and its v good

ulvir

lighthouse returned

ulvir

the bride of lighthouse

ulvir

iím on a reread of Ulysses

after that Iím either gonna hit Trieste by Dasa Drndic or Journey by moonlight bu Antal Szerb

ulvir

Bilirubin posted:

I am reading Swann's Way right now for the first time, the Montcrieff translation, and am very much enjoying it. Not finding it problematic in the least. How would you say Lydia Davis differed?

I mean I should probably just get off my rear end and read it in French but I lack vocabulary in aesthetics

if you stick with the rest of the volumes the narrator becomes really obsessive (and possessive) about a character named Albertine later on, like vol. 3 and out, Iím guessing they were referring to that

ulvir

pessoa owns

ulvir

beer pal posted:

joining the byob proust gang, just started swann's way

hell yes. I just finished time regained this week, the whole work owns

now iím reading If this is a man, Levi was such a good writer

ulvir

I disagree that Proust isnít funny, pretty much every volume has scenes that Iíve laughed loudly at :)

ulvir

bad guy posted:

post one! this is not a challenge or anything, i would just love to be proven wrong and i like to laugh

iíll have to push this to the weekend when I have the time to go back through them (and also to translate from norwegian or alternatively find the corresponding quote on gutenberg or w/e), but iíd love to

ulvir

hereís an example from the latter 2/3rds of Swannís Way

Proust posted:


These little eccentricities on my grandfather's part implied no ill-will whatsoever towards my friends. But Bloch had displeased my family for other reasons. He had begun by annoying my father, who, seeing him come in with wet clothes, had asked him with keen interest:
"Why, M. Bloch, is there a change in the weather; has it been raining? I can't understand it; the barometer has been 'set fair.'"
Which drew from Bloch nothing more instructive than "Sir, I am absolutely incapable of telling you whether it has rained. I live so resolutely apart from physical contingencies that my senses no longer trouble to inform me of them."
"My poor boy," said my father after Bloch had gone, "your friend is out of his mind. Why, he couldn't even tell me what the weather was like. As if there could be anything more interesting! He is an imbecile."
Next, Bloch had displeased my grandmother because, after luncheon, when she complained of not feeling very well, he had stifled a sob and wiped the tears from his eyes.
"You cannot imagine that he is sincere," she observed to me. "Why he doesn't know me. Unless he's mad, of course."
And finally he had upset the whole household when he arrived an hour and a half late for luncheon and covered with mud from head to foot, and made not the least apology, saying merely: "I never allow myself to be influenced in the smallest degree either by atmospheric disturbances or by the arbitrary divisions of what is known as Time. I would willingly reintroduce to society the opium pipe of China or the Malayan kriss, but I am wholly and entirely without instruction in those infinitely more pernicious (besides being quite bleakly bourgeois) implements, the umbrella and the watch."

ulvir

satantango is good

im gonna read chasing homer some time this summer. it has a silly gimmick where you scan QR codes to get a chapter soundtrack composed specifically for the novel

ulvir

during a trip I read Jenny Erpenbeckís Aller tage abend and Joshua Cohenís The Netanyahus. the first was great and the second made me chuckle a bit but was otherwise just okay

now iím slowly reading the concept of anxiety by Kierkegaard

ulvir

fun fact about gunnlaugr saga is that itís in some ways a bit of an atypical saga, in that Helga is such a passive figure compared to females in a lot of other sagas. thereís some speculation that it mightíve been modelled after chivalric romances

ulvir

3D Megadoodoo posted:

Same. But not just pronouns. I don't think I'll ever be fluent in Swedish because of the dang genders. I can read (well, somewhat) because obviously the gender is right there, but trying to write or speak? Yeah nah my brain isn't retaining that information.

swedish gender is so strange to me, because they only have common and neuter, yet somehow retains a wide range of declensions that contain remains of feminine/masculine distinctions. and this is speaking as someone whose language has retained all three genders

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ulvir

i bought a big book this week with a cover that imo has a p byob vibe. i mean check this https://nupress.northwestern.edu/9780810145702/divine-days/

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