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Boogalo
Jul 8, 2012

Meep Meep






After going through many different foods trying to find one that didn't give Milly the shits, we ended up on a single protein (zero fish as she's allergic) prescription diet which at $60 for a 5lb is expensive, i would never be able to afford the $300/month it would cost to keep her fed on the canned variety in addition to the first case of i tried i ended up throwing half of it out since the idiots wouldn't eat it. I still keep the wet around and put out a spoonfull daily as kindof a treat but they're otherwise free-fed the dry food and do great with that and their fountain.

At the end of the day feed your cat whatever the gently caress they'll eat, with an eye towards higher quality foods with low incidence of recalls. Higher quality dry foods might be expensive but they also tend to be more calorie dense so you feed less of it and it can come out to way less extra $$$ than you thought. Milly only needed 1/3-1/2 a cup of Acana while a cheap store brand needed 1.5cups+ per day for the same calories.

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Canadian Bakin
Nov 6, 2011

Retaliate first.


Last year our vet recommended swapping our cats over to a senior food diet as they turn 10 soon. He did mention that one of the signs that they might need this would be an increase in vomiting which we have seen over the last six months or so. That being said, ours like to get hairballs relatively frequently(long haired cats) and the one little idiot eats any plastic he can get his paws on.
They won't eat wet food. God only knows, I've tried repeatedly over the years. And they've been happily eating Orijen Cat and Kitten kibble for the last 8 years.
Is there a consensus as to what constitutes a good senior food? Low fat content? Low protein? I did read the bit about grain free not being an ideal anymore so I've got that in mind.

feedback loop
Feb 16, 2015


I just got a bonded pair of cats this weekend and apparently need to re-learn how to feed cats. I'm about to transition them off the cheapo Purina that their foster mom fed them, but I bought a big ol bag of Nutrish grain-free food before seeing the OP's warning about grain-free foods - should I really be avoiding them at all costs? Don't wanna give them poison but don't wanna overreact and rush to donate or return the food either.

Charles
May 9, 2004

zoom-zoom


Toilet Rascal

Does anybody remember who makes the Kirkland chicken dog food? Can I get some at a local store instead of driving to Costco?

Culex
Jul 22, 2007

Crime sucks.


Diamond is the base brand. So, Taste of the Wild at Petco and PetSmart, Diamond at smaller retailers,, 4Health at Tractor Supply...

Charles
May 9, 2004

zoom-zoom


Toilet Rascal

Thank you! I couldn't remember anymore. It makes up a majority of the shelter provided food and this doggy seems to have a sensitive system.

Buff Hardback
Jun 11, 2019



feedback loop posted:

I just got a bonded pair of cats this weekend and apparently need to re-learn how to feed cats. I'm about to transition them off the cheapo Purina that their foster mom fed them, but I bought a big ol bag of Nutrish grain-free food before seeing the OP's warning about grain-free foods - should I really be avoiding them at all costs? Don't wanna give them poison but don't wanna overreact and rush to donate or return the food either.

My understanding is that right now the only real "definitely reconsider this dietary choice" is for dogs, not for cats. There's been a handful of cases reported to the FDA for cats compared to the bunch of cases for dogs. Like was mentioned on the first page, the issue isn't necessarily not having grains, its an interplay of potential nutritional side effects by swapping grains out for other things.

Kibble needs starch to be extruded, grains provide that starch, but don't provide that protein, so they have to make sure they put lots of animal protein in the formula. Replace grains with legumes or potatoes (which contain more crude protein than grains do), and then you can cut meat protein proportion. Cut meat protein proportion, you start losing the amount of taurine, with the additional potential side effect of some stuff contained in legumes/potatoes being a antinutrient when it comes to absorbing amino acids and stuff.

I'd argue that a grain free food at ~30% crude protein with potatoes is slightly riskier than a grain free food at ~40% crude protein with zero legumes/potatoes in it. However, when I say slightly riskier, I do mean only barely riskier. Cats have more or less already gone through the "oh crap they need taurine" phase of nutritional science, so they're much less susceptible to the interplay of grain-free and DCM. Cats can't synthesize taurine, so all cat food was supplemented with it. Dogs can synthesize taurine from animal protein, but if the numbers aren't adding up, they aren't getting enough taurine down the line.

MikeyTsi
Jan 10, 2009



feedback loop posted:

I just got a bonded pair of cats this weekend and apparently need to re-learn how to feed cats. I'm about to transition them off the cheapo Purina that their foster mom fed them, but I bought a big ol bag of Nutrish grain-free food before seeing the OP's warning about grain-free foods - should I really be avoiding them at all costs? Don't wanna give them poison but don't wanna overreact and rush to donate or return the food either.

No, they figured out the taurine issue with feline feed in the 70's. All cat food has taurine additive now and isn't a problem.

MikeyTsi
Jan 10, 2009



For a little more background, dogs and humans can synthesize taurine internally, cats can't. Hence the need for taurine additives in feline feed. It wasn't expected to be a problem in dogs due to being able to synthesize internally, but it looks like at least some of the grain free formulas may not have enough of the requisite base ingredients to synthesize.

Organza Quiz
Nov 7, 2009




That said, the whole grain fee debacle led me to understand that there's actually very little regulation of cat food, and a lot of the grain free brands that are popping up are small operations that don't necessarily have the science knowledge backing them up to make decent food, so it's worth considering using the bigger brands as they actually formulate the food right.

MikeyTsi
Jan 10, 2009



Organza Quiz posted:

That said, the whole grain fee debacle led me to understand that there's actually very little regulation of cat food, and a lot of the grain free brands that are popping up are small operations that don't necessarily have the science knowledge backing them up to make decent food, so it's worth considering using the bigger brands as they actually formulate the food right.

I went with Orijen because they pretty regularly win pet food awards. Using Fromms right now but I might move the new canine over to Orijen.

feedback loop
Feb 16, 2015


Thanks everyone for the reassurance, I'm glad to hear my cats won't be in any danger with this food.

MikeyTsi posted:

For a little more background, dogs and humans can synthesize taurine internally, cats can't. Hence the need for taurine additives in feline feed. It wasn't expected to be a problem in dogs due to being able to synthesize internally, but it looks like at least some of the grain free formulas may not have enough of the requisite base ingredients to synthesize.

This in particular was very useful - I didn't entirely understand the taurine issue until now.

Mozi
Apr 4, 2004


here he comes
and he's gone again


Nap Ghost

Eh just give the cat or dog a can of Red Bull daily, that should be sufficient for their taurine intake.

Dogen
May 5, 2002

Bury my body down by the highwayside, so that my old evil spirit can get a Greyhound bus and ride


Mozi posted:

Eh just give the cat or dog a can of Red Bull daily, that should be sufficient for their taurine intake.

Honestly if you don't have a water fountain and a red bull fountain your cats should be taken away from you

Shroomie
Jul 31, 2008



One of my cats had a urinary block last week and is doing better now, but the emergency vet didn't give us an RX for Hill's or whatever so I just picked up some Pro Plan Urinary Health.

It says it's got 100% nutrition for adult cats, so I can just feed it to both of my cats right? Do I need to go get an RX from a normal vet or should it be fine? Do I just wait and see if his dick closes up again?

Can I give him a few Greenies a day without loving him up?

I'm going to ask around and find a regular vet to get him a check up in 3-4 weeks, but I'm sitting here overthinking everything in the meantime.

Dogen
May 5, 2002

Bury my body down by the highwayside, so that my old evil spirit can get a Greyhound bus and ride


I have been told that non rx urinary food doesn’t work for poo poo.

Re: feeding multiple cats urinary food out of convenience when not all of them need it, it’s not the absolute best but you can feed it to all cats and it’s totally fine. It will be difficult to get a cat off it once they start eating it though (they will be likely to develop urinary tract problems if you cease feeding it to them).

This is based on my personal experience and conversations with my vet and observations my wife made when she worked at a cat only vet for a couple years.

Mid-Priced Carp
Aug 10, 2008


Does anyone have recommendations for good cat treats? I've been giving my trash goblin Greenies, but picked up somewhere brushing his teeth regularly would probably be better for him than dental treats.

AnonymousNarcotics
Aug 6, 2012

we will go far into the sea
you will take me
onto your back
never look back
never look back


My boys are obsessed with Temptations. Idk how good they are for them but they love them.

I also bought some of these that they like and it's 100% meat https://pierlesspets.com/collections/cat-treats/products/turkey-hearts

Dogen
May 5, 2002

Bury my body down by the highwayside, so that my old evil spirit can get a Greyhound bus and ride


Can confirm 3 of our 4 cats love salmon temptations, we got some with Severus (our youngest) when he came from the shelter because the owner who surrendered him said they were his jam, and we have trained him and our other boy cat to stand up and eat them out of our hands. Oona is slow and old so I throw hers on the floor while the boys are concentrating on eating from my hand.

Bee would not deign to eat a cat treat but she will lick my ice cream sometimes.

bloody ghost titty
Oct 23, 2008

tHROW SOME D"s ON THAT BIZNATCH


So the missus asked me to look into the farmers dog to add/transition out of the existing kibble, and looking at the price tag and being more than competent with a kitchen knife and scale, I was wondering if it wouldn’t be prudent to follow their recipes at home, or if there are some resources for people who want to feed small dogs well without being absolutely crazy pants about it.

Buff Hardback
Jun 11, 2019



bloody ghost titty posted:

So the missus asked me to look into the farmers dog to add/transition out of the existing kibble, and looking at the price tag and being more than competent with a kitchen knife and scale, I was wondering if it wouldn’t be prudent to follow their recipes at home, or if there are some resources for people who want to feed small dogs well without being absolutely crazy pants about it.

Honestly, I'd be hesitant to do it. They don't sell their "nutrient packs" yet, so you'd be flying blind when it comes comes to those, especially since you'd be nutrient deficient without those. Either you're spending a lot of money for the nutritional stuff to be done right when it comes to raw/fresh food, or you're risking it, given that you can't ask a dog "did you eat your veggies" and get an actual answer.

Facebook Aunt
Oct 4, 2008

i like cats


bloody ghost titty posted:

So the missus asked me to look into the farmers dog to add/transition out of the existing kibble, and looking at the price tag and being more than competent with a kitchen knife and scale, I was wondering if it wouldn’t be prudent to follow their recipes at home, or if there are some resources for people who want to feed small dogs well without being absolutely crazy pants about it.

Dogs are omnivores who live on scraps and literal trash through most of our history together, so it shouldn't be much harder to feed a dog from scratch than to feed a human child. But on the other hand you are not a dog nutritionist and you don't want to soylent your dog, and it can take years to realize you've hosed up and turned your dogs bones to jelly. I might try something like 1/2 or 2/3 good quality kibble and the remainder a healthy homemade whole food slurry. Potentially get the best of both worlds a baseline nutrition plus the extra vitamins and trace minerals that maybe don't do so well going through the rendering plant and kibbilziation.

You could keep a journal or database or whatever. Track the dog's weight, shape, coat condition, teeth, eyes and so on once a month. Taking a couple minutes to evaluate his condition every month will help you notice if he's getting fat, bony, or dandruff or other potential red flags before it becomes a big problem.

Innocuous
Mar 1, 2003

It's a strange world.





Is there any meaningful distinction in health or outcomes between the large brand kidney diet foods for dogs? Our vet started us off with Hills and honestly it just felt like we were feeding her a blob of fat but she loved it even if it made her poop a little weird. We switched to Royal Canin and the poop is more normal but she likes it a lot less even though she finishes her portions.

The dog in question is a 14-15 year old shepherd mutt with stage 3 failure who is otherwise incredibly spry and active, if a bit lumpy.

MikeyTsi
Jan 10, 2009



Innocuous posted:

Is there any meaningful distinction in health or outcomes between the large brand kidney diet foods for dogs? Our vet started us off with Hills and honestly it just felt like we were feeding her a blob of fat but she loved it even if it made her poop a little weird. We switched to Royal Canin and the poop is more normal but she likes it a lot less even though she finishes her portions.

The dog in question is a 14-15 year old shepherd mutt with stage 3 failure who is otherwise incredibly spry and active, if a bit lumpy.

The main veterinary diets are all pretty much garbage. Check with Farmina, they do high-quality vet diets. Keep in mind you'll probably have to order from them (the few places in the states that stock Farmina don't carry vet diets), and you'll need to send them a copy of the prescription from your vet.

WombatCyborg
Apr 2, 2011




Hey, so I'm giving my cat exclusive wet right now, but I read the box and realized I'd been giving half what I was supposed to each day apparently. Is there a definitive answer as to how many calories per pound a cat needs? It's great wet food, all protein with no fillers, I just don't know how much is enough and if the box is potentially going to give instructions that lead to an overweight cat.

Gaj
Apr 30, 2006


Define fillers. There has been research showing that all meat diets for cats/dogs can cause heart problems long term. Different "fillers" have effects on said cats digestion, my cat stops having a filthy butt when I got her a food with brown rice meal.

Depending on you cats age and activity level, it may need to eat more or less. This will effect their weight. Weigh the cat and feed them the full ration, and track their weight for a month or 2.

WombatCyborg
Apr 2, 2011




Ah, by fillers I was referring to grain products, I was under the impression those were basically useless for cats?

Boogalo
Jul 8, 2012

Meep Meep






Yeah, and most if not all of the grain free food issues I've seen were related to dogs and not cats.

My big takeaway from the grain free scare is all pet food and especially dog food was not sufficiently enriched with taurine. We already knew cats needed it since they can't synthesize it themselves, but dogs can, given sufficient other nutrients and that wasn't happening enough for good health, especially in larger breeds. Some cats did show heart issues so upping taurine in cat food a little will likely help as well.

But I am not a vet, just a cat butler.

Tamarillo
Aug 6, 2009


WombatCyborg posted:

Ah, by fillers I was referring to grain products, I was under the impression those were basically useless for cats?

It's less about grain so much as things that have low bioavailability to cats. Sufficiently rendered, a cat can access carbohydrates from grain products; and from top of my head and not looking back to double check but I think a lot of the corn products in food has high bioavailability despite not seeming like a "normal" diet choice - and some ingredients touted as better alternatives are actually less available for digestion. I care significantly less about ingredient content now vs nutritional composition.

Facebook Aunt
Oct 4, 2008

i like cats


WombatCyborg posted:

Hey, so I'm giving my cat exclusive wet right now, but I read the box and realized I'd been giving half what I was supposed to each day apparently. Is there a definitive answer as to how many calories per pound a cat needs? It's great wet food, all protein with no fillers, I just don't know how much is enough and if the box is potentially going to give instructions that lead to an overweight cat.

There is no definitive answer to how many calories "a cat" needs, no. A maine coon can be like 18 pounds and not overweight, while some other cats top out at like 6 pounds as adults and are perfectly healthy. Some cats are crazy active, other cats snooze all day and can get by with fewer calories.

You have go by results. If your cat is bony feed more, if your cat is chonky feed less.

listrada
Jan 2, 2017


What is the general opinion about free feeding vs meal times, and urine food vs regular food? IIRC the old thread said to always feed prescription food if prescribed even if it wasn't super high quality, but what's the opinion of the food isn't prescribed?

Okay, so - one of my two kitties experienced some food insecurity before I got her and would freak out if she ever saw the bottom of the bowl, so I just got a big dog dish and kept it full. Over the past few years, her food anxiety has gotten much better, but we've kept free feeding because neither cat is fat (well, they're both a little tubby but not fat-fat) and I like the convenience.

The problem is that the boy cat recently started having peeing problems. Sometimes he'll pee for a long time and lick himself a lot when he gets out of the box. No blockages, yet. The vet says it's idiopathic cystitis or FLUTD (same thing?), and it could be caused by stress and/or being tubby.

So - stress: the house isn't very stressy, but the girl cat can be a dick to him sometimes. They coexist fine and play together occasionally, but we do not have kitten cuddle puddles going on. This might be more of a behavioral question, but does anyone have any ideas for how to make the girl cat be less of a dick?

Anyway. Back to the diet question for the diet thread: the vet said that switching to meal times and to a urine food "might help" prevent bouts of cystitis. Obviously I want to do the right thing to keep the cat healthy, but I don't love this idea because free feeding has worked pretty well and we have a high quality non-urine food that everyone really likes (Scrumbles). Finding a high quality food in the UK was so hard that I'm worried about finding a specialty food that doesn't suck.

If the vet had said "definitely switch to a urine food" I'd definitely do it, but since she didn't I feel a little lost here. Goon hive mind, what should we do? Do mealtimes with rx food? Free feed dry during the day and maybe do rx wet food at night? Keep the same food and put feliway diffusers all over the house?

Fluffy Bunnies
Jan 9, 2009

FUCK





Facebook Aunt posted:

There is no definitive answer to how many calories "a cat" needs, no. A maine coon can be like 18 pounds and not overweight, while some other cats top out at like 6 pounds as adults and are perfectly healthy. Some cats are crazy active, other cats snooze all day and can get by with fewer calories.

You have go by results. If your cat is bony feed more, if your cat is chonky feed less.



Cats require 30 calories per pound per day to maintain a healthy weight, with a value play of 25-35 depending on cat activity level. Most lazy cats require right at 30 calories per pound; so a 6 pound cat would require 180.

listrada posted:

What is the general opinion about free feeding vs meal times, and urine food vs regular food? IIRC the old thread said to always feed prescription food if prescribed even if it wasn't super high quality, but what's the opinion of the food isn't prescribed?

Okay, so - one of my two kitties experienced some food insecurity before I got her and would freak out if she ever saw the bottom of the bowl, so I just got a big dog dish and kept it full. Over the past few years, her food anxiety has gotten much better, but we've kept free feeding because neither cat is fat (well, they're both a little tubby but not fat-fat) and I like the convenience.

The problem is that the boy cat recently started having peeing problems. Sometimes he'll pee for a long time and lick himself a lot when he gets out of the box. No blockages, yet. The vet says it's idiopathic cystitis or FLUTD (same thing?), and it could be caused by stress and/or being tubby.

So - stress: the house isn't very stressy, but the girl cat can be a dick to him sometimes. They coexist fine and play together occasionally, but we do not have kitten cuddle puddles going on. This might be more of a behavioral question, but does anyone have any ideas for how to make the girl cat be less of a dick?

Anyway. Back to the diet question for the diet thread: the vet said that switching to meal times and to a urine food "might help" prevent bouts of cystitis. Obviously I want to do the right thing to keep the cat healthy, but I don't love this idea because free feeding has worked pretty well and we have a high quality non-urine food that everyone really likes (Scrumbles). Finding a high quality food in the UK was so hard that I'm worried about finding a specialty food that doesn't suck.

If the vet had said "definitely switch to a urine food" I'd definitely do it, but since she didn't I feel a little lost here. Goon hive mind, what should we do? Do mealtimes with rx food? Free feed dry during the day and maybe do rx wet food at night? Keep the same food and put feliway diffusers all over the house?

stop free-feeding your cats before "tubby" turns into "diabetic" and "diabetic" turns into "urinary crystals"; which eventually usually turns into "kidney failure". If you can afford wet, feed wet. If your cat freaks out over an empty bowl; try putting toys in said bowl so they redirect into playtime.

sunaurus
Feb 13, 2012

Oh great, another bookah.


I know there are people here with way more pet experience than me, so I'm hoping to get some advice regarding my 4 year old dog, because she has been having issues with her anal glands for over a year now.

For some background, this is her food history:
1) 2016: Orijen puppy
2) 2017-2018: Orijen adult
3) 2019 - 2020 spring: Royal Canin medium adult
4) 2020 spring - now: Royal Canin hypoallergenic

We switched away from Orijen due to the DCM danger, but shortly after she started getting Royal Canin medium adult, she started having constant issues with her anal sacs not emptying at all. We went to a bunch of different vets and eventually figured out that the problem was a combination of her anal glands being in a slightly irregular position and her poop being a just bit softer than normal (not diarrhea or anything, it was a very subtle difference in consistency).
We managed to solve the issue for a while by switching to Royal Canin hypoallergenic, because that food completely dried up her poop and made it really firm. It had that effect on her all summer, but it stopped working about a week ago - her poop has become softer again.
What's even worse is that it's quite obvious that she doesn't enjoy eating the hypoallergenic food at all. She usually has an endless appetite, but with the hypoallergenic, she sometimes leaves food in her bowl for hours. Orijen kibble used to even motivate her enough to be used as a reward for training, but she has no interest at all in the hypoallergenic kibble. We recently started using Specific dog treats to reward her instead, but I suspect those are the cause for her poop being softer again, so I think we will need to stop.

Basically, I'm looking for some advice on alternative foods to try. I don't think she had any soft poop issues on Orijen, so I'm almost considering trying it again, but I will never forgive myself if she gets some heart issues as a result. Ideally, I'm hoping to find some food that will harden up her poop while still being tasty enough to be used as a reward. I realize that all dogs are different so there's no immediately clear answer, but there are really a lot of different brands available. Maybe someone could share some recommendations in order to narrow down the list of options?

sunaurus fucked around with this message at 09:40 on Oct 8, 2020

Fluffy Bunnies
Jan 9, 2009

FUCK





sunaurus posted:

I know there are people here with way more pet experience than me, so I'm hoping to get some advice regarding my 4 year old dog, because she has been having issues with her anal glands for over a year now.

For some background, this is her food history:
1) 2016: Orijen puppy
2) 2017-2018: Orijen adult
3) 2019 - 2020 spring: Royal Canin medium adult
4) 2020 spring - now: Royal Canin hypoallergenic

We switched away from Orijen due to the DCM danger, but shortly after she started getting Royal Canin medium adult, she started having constant issues with her anal sacs not emptying at all. We went to a bunch of different vets and eventually figured out that the problem was a combination of her anal glands being in a slightly irregular position and her poop being a just bit softer than normal (not diarrhea or anything, it was a very subtle difference in consistency).
We managed to solve the issue for a while by switching to Royal Canin hypoallergenic, because that food completely dried up her poop and made it really firm. It had that effect on her all summer, but it stopped working about a week ago - her poop has become softer again.
What's even worse is that it's quite obvious that she doesn't enjoy eating the hypoallergenic food at all. She usually has an endless appetite, but with the hypoallergenic, she sometimes leaves food in her bowl for hours. Orijen kibble used to even motivate her enough to be used as a reward for training, but she has no interest at all in the hypoallergenic kibble. We recently started using Specific dog treats to reward her instead, but I suspect those are the cause for her poop being softer again, so I think we will need to stop.

Basically, I'm looking for some advice on alternative foods to try. I don't think she had any soft poop issues on Orijen, so I'm almost considering trying it again, but I will never forgive myself if she gets some heart issues as a result. Ideally, I'm hoping to find some food that will harden up her poop while still being tasty enough to be used as a reward. I realize that all dogs are different so there's no immediately clear answer, but there are really a lot of different brands available. Maybe someone could share some recommendations in order to narrow down the list of options?

The risk for DCM is still incredibly low, but hey. You care about your dog. I'm not gonna dig on you for that.

I'm a big fan of Blackwood's large breed fish and Sport Dog Food's tracking dog at the moment. How big is she? What's her energy level like?

sunaurus
Feb 13, 2012

Oh great, another bookah.


Thanks! I'll try to see if I can find those brands for sale anywhere.

She's a Cardigan Welsh Corgi, so I think she's just bordering on medium size. She weighs about 14kg. I don't really have any good baselines for comparison in terms of energy levels, but our usual routine is one or two play sessions during the day and a 2-3km walk every evening, and that doesn't really tire her out at all. She only really gets tired when playing with other dogs for hours or when we go for long hikes on weekends.

Fluffy Bunnies
Jan 9, 2009

FUCK





sunaurus posted:

Thanks! I'll try to see if I can find those brands for sale anywhere.

She's a Cardigan Welsh Corgi, so I think she's just bordering on medium size. She weighs about 14kg. I don't really have any good baselines for comparison in terms of energy levels, but our usual routine is one or two play sessions during the day and a 2-3km walk every evening, and that doesn't really tire her out at all. She only really gets tired when playing with other dogs for hours or when we go for long hikes on weekends.

Try sport dog food's herding dog; you can get it directly from them or on chewy. As a CWC, she's super low risk for DCM (it's mostly been larger dogs; retrievers and up) but again. You're worried about your little long girl. That's cool.

She sounds pretty chill for a corgi. That's a good girl.

MikeyTsi
Jan 10, 2009



My vet's advice when I was feeding orijen was that if I was concerned to supplement additional taurine. You can get it as chewable tablets.

Fluffy Bunnies
Jan 9, 2009

FUCK





MikeyTsi posted:

My vet's advice when I was feeding orijen was that if I was concerned to supplement additional taurine. You can get it as chewable tablets.

Various universities studying DCM's link with legumes have stated that this is not an acceptable measure if the food is continued to be fed. Increased doses of taurine have not improved uptake in effected animals.

Sankta Lucia
Jan 3, 2013



my cat's developed an allergy, so I'm making a quick and dirty switch to a new one. I got a hill's veterinary brand with the same meat type (chicken) as his old food because that seems to help with the transition, but some sites also recommended sprinkling a bit of nutritional yeast on it to make the new food more enticing. i'm vegetarian so conveniently, I have a bunch that I use for cooking. he's absolutely crazy for it, but does anyone here have experience with this particular trick? I would hate to go to the vet earlier than planned due to a food strike, but it seems a little sketchy. any advice would be appreciated!

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MaliciousOnion
Sep 23, 2009

Ignorance, the root of all evil


I've recently adopted a 10 month old cat and had a look at what's available from our local supermarket. Based on my limited understanding of what's good, I've narrowed the selection down to just two brands - Applaws and Nood - but I'd love to get opinions.

Alternatively, if anyone knows what brands are good in Australia and where I can get them cheap, I'd love to hear.

edit: here's the ingredients panel for Applaws:

MaliciousOnion fucked around with this message at 08:39 on Oct 27, 2020

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