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lifg
Dec 4, 2000
The Young Turks committed the Armenian Genocide.


Muldoon

Iíve only read the Locas stories, so the above post is baffling and enticing to me.

What do you all think about going back and forth between Locas and Palomar books for this thread? Comparing what the brothers were doing at the the same time sounds fun.

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How Wonderful!
Jul 18, 2006






I only have excellent ideas


lifg posted:

Iíve only read the Locas stories, so the above post is baffling and enticing to me.

What do you all think about going back and forth between Locas and Palomar books for this thread? Comparing what the brothers were doing at the the same time sounds fun.

I think it's a solid idea, although the recent Fantagraphics collections make some weird decisions in terms of printing order, so you're not always getting a straight chronology per se. I do feel like Gilbert hits the ground running with Palomar a little more quickly than Jaime does with the Locas stuff, Heartbreak Soup is excellent from page one.

fez_machine
Nov 27, 2004
You have1 unread message



How Wonderful! posted:

I think it's a solid idea, although the recent Fantagraphics collections make some weird decisions in terms of printing order, so you're not always getting a straight chronology per se. I do feel like Gilbert hits the ground running with Palomar a little more quickly than Jaime does with the Locas stuff, Heartbreak Soup is excellent from page one.

Gilbert got his weirdness/experminental out in most of the non-Palomar stuff he was doing in Love and Rockets, where as Jaimie has basically stayed on variations on Locas for his entire career.

lifg
Dec 4, 2000
The Young Turks committed the Armenian Genocide.


Muldoon

Are those early experiments missing from the Fantagraphics L&R collections?

How Wonderful!
Jul 18, 2006






I only have excellent ideas


A lot of it is in Amor y Cohetes but I'm not sure if all of it is. I think that Comics Dementia is mostly slightly more recent stuff (90s onwards) but I could be off.

fez_machine posted:

Gilbert got his weirdness/experminental out in most of the non-Palomar stuff he was doing in Love and Rockets, where as Jaimie has basically stayed on variations on Locas for his entire career.

Hm, I don't know, I think that even a lot of his "main" projects are really at their best when he dives back into magical realism and this almost numinous element of strangeness. I was thinking of the tree in "Spirit of the Thing" and I think Poison River that gives whoever approaches it what they want depending on how long they can bear to see it reveal itself, the "bird research" people in Children of Palomar, stuff like that.

How Wonderful! fucked around with this message at 16:18 on May 26, 2020

fez_machine
Nov 27, 2004
You have1 unread message



How Wonderful! posted:

A lot of it is in Amor y Cohetes but I'm not sure if all of it is. I think that Comics Dementia is mostly slightly more recent stuff (90s onwards) but I could be off.


Hm, I don't know, I think that even a lot of his "main" projects are really at their best when he dives back into magical realism and this almost numinous element of strangeness. I was thinking of the tree in "Spirit of the Thing" and I think Poison River that gives whoever approaches it what they want depending on how long they can bear to see it reveal itself, the "bird research" people in Children of Palomar, stuff like that.

I phrased it badly, I think, what I meant was that the early Palomar stuff occupies firmer literary ground than early Locas. While Jaimie is dabbling in super heroes and super science and dinosaurs, Beto did all his pulp genre experimentation in the stuff collected in Amor y Cohetes.

In some ways Beto is more interesting to me because he's just as good a cartoonist as Jaimie if radically different in style, but rejected the early praise and interest to do his own weirdness. There's a lot of people who would have been very happy to see Gilbert do Palomar forever and ever. Certainly when I was reading the original collections, I liked Beto's stuff more than I liked Jaimie's. It definitely flipped at some point though.

Beto's highs in Love and Rockets Volume 1 are very high, but you can see him bristling against being pigeon holed into latin american magical realism soap opera.

Jaimie's interests have largely coincided with the audience's interests once he got his groove going. Except maybe his latest stuff which is showing a bit of the ol' Beto, "gently caress you, this comic is about new characters".

Comics Dementia has some stuff going back to the 80s, but yeah it's mainly 90s onwards. Reading collections of the Hernandez bros. is a nightmare of missed stuff including Beto whole heap of non-Love and Rockets comics that range from sublime to "interesting" most of which are uncollected. That's not even beginning to talk about all the stuff Mario has done (which I think is pretty good! If not to the standard of his brothers).

Vincent
Nov 25, 2005

Goodness no, now that wouldn't do at all!

Oh yeah, you have a good point. Love and Rockets, while being their main thing, is not the only thing Los Bros have done. There's some other comics, guest strips, pin-ups and short stories that have never been collected and that must be a bitch to track down, since they were originally in indie or small press comics from the 80's and 90's.

fez_machine
Nov 27, 2004
You have1 unread message



Vincent posted:

Oh yeah, you have a good point. Love and Rockets, while being their main thing, is not the only thing Los Bros have done. There's some other comics, guest strips, pin-ups and short stories that have never been collected and that must be a bitch to track down, since they were originally in indie or small press comics from the 80's and 90's.

Worse, there's stuff done for Dark Horse, Marvel, DC, and Image from the 2000s that's uncollected as well.

Jordan7hm
Feb 17, 2011

MENS REA? LOL MORE LIKE CHRIS REA AM I RITE





Lipstick Apathy

Yeah thereís lots of random stuff. DC did some weird pulls in the 2000s, with guys like Pete Bagge and Gilbert Hernandez doing little mini series.

How Wonderful!
Jul 18, 2006






I only have excellent ideas


Oh yeah, there was a Beto/Darwyn Cooke miniseries that I very very vaguely remember.

Edge & Christian
May 20, 2001

Earth-1145 is truly the best!
A world of singing, magic frogs,
high adventure, no shitposters


I think the majority of Beto's stuff is collected, at least projects of any length; contributions to anthologies almost always get left behind whether it's down to rights issues, creators not wanting to reprint them, or there just not really being a space for them. In terms of major works not printed as "Love & Rockets" from Beto:

Still Basically Love & Rockets
New Love (1996), Luba (1999), Luba's Comics and Stories (2001): Almost all collected in the Love & Rockets Library

Love & Rockets Related But Collected Separately
New Tales of Old Palomar (2006): Collected in Children of Palomar (2013), available physically/digitally from Fantagraphics
Julio's Day: Originally printed in Love & Rockets, but collected separately (I think the Library editions are already well past where it would be slotted in there?
Adventures of Venus: Largely reprints from the "Measles" anthology book, along with an original story, available physically/digitally from Fantagraphics. All-ages stories about Luba's niece.
Chance in Hell (2007), The Troublemakers (2009), and Love From the Shadows (2011) : A series of OGNs described as "comic adaptations starring or co-starring Fritz from Love & Rockets", all available physically and digitally from Fantagraphics.
Speak of the Devil (2004): Described as "not an adaptation of the Fritz-starring movie, but a chronicle of the actual events that inspired the movie". Available as a physical/digital collection from Dark Horse

Other Stuff
Mister X: Beto and Jaime's 1980s work is reprinted in Mister X Archives from Dark Horse
Birdland: Gilbert's erotica series from Eros/Fantagraphics, not on Comixology for obvious reasons but various reprints are around.
Girl Crazy (1997): Collected by Dark Horse
Yeah! (1999): Written by Peter Bagge, drawn by Gilbert. Originally published by DC, reprinted physically and digitally by Fantagraphics
Grip: The Strange World of Men (2002): Originally published by Vertigo, reprinted physically and digitally by Dark Horse
Birds of Prey: Gilbert wrote a six issue arc of Birds of Prey (1999, #50-56) that as of yet is not collected but all the single issues are up on Comixology.
Sloth (2006): A Vertigo OGN that looks like it's out of print, but will presumably lapse back to the creators (like Yeah! and Sloth did) and get reprinted soon
Citizen Rex (2009): A Mario/Beto collaboration, available physically/digitally from Dark Horse
Fatima: The Blood Spinners (2015): Sci-Fi story that I am kind of surprised isn't a Fritz movie "adaptation" (unless it is, somehow?) available physically/digitally from Dark Horse
Marble Season (2013) and Bumperhead (2014): OGNs from Drawn & Quarterly, available physically and digitally
Loverboys (2015): Available physically and digitally from Dark Horse
The Twilight Children (2015): Vertigo mini-series written by Gilbert, drawn by Darwyn Cooke. In print as a trade/up on Comixology
Blubber (2016): A mash-up of funny animals, Kirby Monsters, and porno. Available as digital single issues on Comixology from Fantagraphics.
Garden of the Flesh (2016): An erotica(?) retelling of the Book of Genesis, I guess? Available physically/digitally from Fantagraphics
Assasinistas (2017): A Black Crown book written by Tini Howard, drawn by Gilbert. Collected/available on Comixology

Really the only thing here that doesn't appear to be in print is Birdland.

How Wonderful!
Jul 18, 2006






I only have excellent ideas


Edge & Christian posted:

I think the majority of Beto's stuff is collected, at least projects of any length; contributions to anthologies almost always get left behind whether it's down to rights issues, creators not wanting to reprint them, or there just not really being a space for them. In terms of major works not printed as "Love & Rockets" from Beto:

Still Basically Love & Rockets
New Love (1996), Luba (1999), Luba's Comics and Stories (2001): Almost all collected in the Love & Rockets Library

Love & Rockets Related But Collected Separately
New Tales of Old Palomar (2006): Collected in Children of Palomar (2013), available physically/digitally from Fantagraphics
Julio's Day: Originally printed in Love & Rockets, but collected separately (I think the Library editions are already well past where it would be slotted in there?
Adventures of Venus: Largely reprints from the "Measles" anthology book, along with an original story, available physically/digitally from Fantagraphics. All-ages stories about Luba's niece.
Chance in Hell (2007), The Troublemakers (2009), and Love From the Shadows (2011) : A series of OGNs described as "comic adaptations starring or co-starring Fritz from Love & Rockets", all available physically and digitally from Fantagraphics.
Speak of the Devil (2004): Described as "not an adaptation of the Fritz-starring movie, but a chronicle of the actual events that inspired the movie". Available as a physical/digital collection from Dark Horse

Other Stuff
Mister X: Beto and Jaime's 1980s work is reprinted in Mister X Archives from Dark Horse
Birdland: Gilbert's erotica series from Eros/Fantagraphics, not on Comixology for obvious reasons but various reprints are around.
Girl Crazy (1997): Collected by Dark Horse
Yeah! (1999): Written by Peter Bagge, drawn by Gilbert. Originally published by DC, reprinted physically and digitally by Fantagraphics
Grip: The Strange World of Men (2002): Originally published by Vertigo, reprinted physically and digitally by Dark Horse
Birds of Prey: Gilbert wrote a six issue arc of Birds of Prey (1999, #50-56) that as of yet is not collected but all the single issues are up on Comixology.
Sloth (2006): A Vertigo OGN that looks like it's out of print, but will presumably lapse back to the creators (like Yeah! and Sloth did) and get reprinted soon
Citizen Rex (2009): A Mario/Beto collaboration, available physically/digitally from Dark Horse
Fatima: The Blood Spinners (2015): Sci-Fi story that I am kind of surprised isn't a Fritz movie "adaptation" (unless it is, somehow?) available physically/digitally from Dark Horse
Marble Season (2013) and Bumperhead (2014): OGNs from Drawn & Quarterly, available physically and digitally
Loverboys (2015): Available physically and digitally from Dark Horse
The Twilight Children (2015): Vertigo mini-series written by Gilbert, drawn by Darwyn Cooke. In print as a trade/up on Comixology
Blubber (2016): A mash-up of funny animals, Kirby Monsters, and porno. Available as digital single issues on Comixology from Fantagraphics.
Garden of the Flesh (2016): An erotica(?) retelling of the Book of Genesis, I guess? Available physically/digitally from Fantagraphics
Assasinistas (2017): A Black Crown book written by Tini Howard, drawn by Gilbert. Collected/available on Comixology

Really the only thing here that doesn't appear to be in print is Birdland.

Most of Adventures of Venus is also collected in Luba and Her Family, interpolated in between a bunch of stuff with Petra and co., which... makes them read a lot differently than they did in Measles.

Edit: I would have also sworn on my grave that Fatima was a Fritz thing but whoa, I guess not.

Endless Mike
Aug 13, 2003

Get running
Start pumping your bunions, I'm coming
I'm the dumbest, who flamethrow your function to Funyons
Flame your crew quicker than Trump fucks his youngest
Now face the flame fuckers your fame and fate's done with



I finished Maggie the Mechanic last night. It definitely becomes a bit more enjoyable as the collection goes on. It's surprisingly dense in its storytelling, in a way you rarely see in superhero comics, particularly, but in American comics in general. An 8 page story does more than entire comic books. Looking forward to reading more! Comixology helpfully recommended the next Locas book at the end, so I borrowed that.

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Vincent
Nov 25, 2005

Goodness no, now that wouldn't do at all!

How Wonderful! posted:

Oh yeah, there was a Beto/Darwyn Cooke miniseries that I very very vaguely remember.

Oh wow! Didn't know about that. Gonna track it down.

Edge & Christian posted:


The Twilight Children (2015): Vertigo mini-series written by Gilbert, drawn by Darwyn Cooke. In print as a trade/up on Comixology
Nice!

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