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Vavrek
Mar 2, 2013

I like your style hombre, but this is no laughing matter. Assault on a police officer. Theft of police property. Illegal possession of a firearm. FIVE counts of attempted murder. That comes to... 29 dollars and 40 cents. Cash, cheque, or credit card?

mind the walrus posted:

When you really pull back and look at the chronology of the mega-franchise, this was very arguably the moment when the era of "Peak Trek" began. The next major release was "Encounter at Farpoint" which set off a run of spin-offs and theatrical releases which spanned around 13 years. It's weird to think of now, and it's not like Star Wars didn't exist during that time, but there were no major Star Wars releases so for the late 80s and nearly all of the 90s Star Trek was the big sci-fi franchise in town. I honestly took it for granted as a kid, and now having had literally 2/3rds of my life bombarded by Lucasfilms' creations I wish I had appreciated that era more.

This is my little moment in Sci-Fi Pop Culture that blew my mind when I realized it. Mid-90s to early-00s you've got multiple Star Trek shows on television and a wealth of other SF shows on the air (Stargate, Farscape, Andromeda, Earth: Final Conflict, Babylon 5, probably others I've forgotten or never saw). At the time, I didn't realize just how weird that was, because I had no pre-mid-90s television experience.

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Vavrek
Mar 2, 2013

I like your style hombre, but this is no laughing matter. Assault on a police officer. Theft of police property. Illegal possession of a firearm. FIVE counts of attempted murder. That comes to... 29 dollars and 40 cents. Cash, cheque, or credit card?

Barudak posted:

Wasn't that similar to the gimmick to some popular fantasy series where the ultimate death spell didn't kill you so much as it made you never exist so using it could, after it murdered you completely, have unintended consequences like the caster having long ago been murdered in this new time line.

Balefire, in The Wheel of Time. Retroactively destroys objects, farther back in time proportional to how much energy was used to create the attack. Then, the world has to adjust to the new causality implied.

The examples given for why using it became taboo, even among servants of the shadow, are all about entire cities having been destroyed and weeks of history rewritten, so "long ago" doesn't mean years. (Unless there's actually a different fantasy series with a similar gimmick?)

In theory, this can be disastrous for the fabric of reality, but in practice it's an incredibly useful tool that saves the lives of a few of the people closest to the main character.

Vavrek
Mar 2, 2013

I like your style hombre, but this is no laughing matter. Assault on a police officer. Theft of police property. Illegal possession of a firearm. FIVE counts of attempted murder. That comes to... 29 dollars and 40 cents. Cash, cheque, or credit card?

Ghost Leviathan posted:

Post-apocalyptic views of the present in general are interesting. Fallout doesn't play with it much, but FNV does mention that most Pre-War literature is incomprehensible to post-war people presumably just from lacking context, though ignorance tends to be a function of lacking education rather than a widespread problem, given well-educated people generally have a decent idea of pre-War history, and there's various individuals still surviving from that era. (mainly robots, ghouls, and individuals like Mr House. And the protagonist of Fallout 4, which is a fun idea that's probably not really used to its full potential)

One of the ending slides from Old World Blues captures it well:

quote:

As the Courier ran through the X-8 facility multiple times, the computers analyzed the test subject's movements. Rather than performing a superficial observation, they realized the subject barely knew what Communism was - or even what a high school was. This confused them for a time, until the facility finally realized that its research had... succeeded.

International Communism just isn't a thing in 2281. Worries about it, training facilities designed to teach how to identify infiltrators, are meaningless abstractions that serve only as obstacles in the 23rd century.

Vavrek
Mar 2, 2013

I like your style hombre, but this is no laughing matter. Assault on a police officer. Theft of police property. Illegal possession of a firearm. FIVE counts of attempted murder. That comes to... 29 dollars and 40 cents. Cash, cheque, or credit card?

endocriminologist posted:

Twist might be wrong but the whole consciousness being an aberration in the universe was like woaaaaah to young me

To me, the twist (or a twist/revelation, anyway) near the end of Blindsight was that Sarasti was a meat-puppet for the ship's AI. It's not clear how much, if any, control the actual Sarasti had. Maybe he had a lot! Maybe he was literally just a peripheral for the computer to interact more easily with humans.

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