Register a SA Forums Account here!
JOINING THE SA FORUMS WILL REMOVE THIS BIG AD, THE ANNOYING UNDERLINED ADS, AND STUPID INTERSTITIAL ADS!!!

You can: log in, read the tech support FAQ, or request your lost password. This dumb message (and those ads) will appear on every screen until you register! Get rid of this crap by registering your own SA Forums Account and joining roughly 150,000 Goons, for the one-time price of $9.95! We charge money because it costs us money per month for bills, and since we don't believe in showing ads to our users, we try to make the money back through forum registrations.
 
  • Post
  • Reply
nine-gear crow
Aug 10, 2013

low vis






This moment right here.

It's a magic combination of the music, the shot composition, the building tension, and the moment of release of three whole movies-worth of struggle and hardship for the TOS crew that begins when Khan fires those first phaser blasts at the original Enterprise and ends right here when the camera pans over the bow of the Excelsior and reveals the Enterprise-A.

It's just one of those perfect movie moments that I wish I could live in forever.

Adbot
ADBOT LOVES YOU

nine-gear crow
Aug 10, 2013

low vis




Linux Pirate posted:

Something about the description of other intelligences in Half-Life 2 by Wallace Breen, and Portal 2 by Cave Jonson, particularity the "gas giants inhabited by vast meteorological intelligences" struck me as something truly alien. A tad ridiculous and at the same time somewhat original. I'm not sure if this concept exists elsewhere in Sci-fi, but the way it's just mentioned in passing really builds up the weirdness of the HL/Portal Universe.

Both Stargate and Star Trek have explored concepts like that yes. On Stargate SG-1, there’s an episode where the Russian Stargate connects to a planet that’s not just entirely water, but the water itself is a massive alien distributed consciousness.

On Stargate Atlantis, there’s an episode of the first season that fakes out the team going back to Earth using a massive planet-covering energy cloud to power the stargate on it to connect to an eight chevron address. It turns out the cloud is intelligent and put them all in a coma dream as a defence mechanism because using the stargate hurts it. So they agree to leave it be and never come back.

Star Trek: Voyager has an episode that’s obliquely about a sentient cloud that the crew quarantine an entire deck of the ship to house while they return it “home,” but it’s basically just a Lower Decks episode where Neelix tries to keep the Borg Kids entertained by making up ghost stories about it until they call him out on his bullshit and goes “Yeah, it’s just a weird sentient space cloud.”

nine-gear crow
Aug 10, 2013

low vis




thrilla in vanilla posted:

Two things come to mind. The part in mass effect at the beginning when Nihilus twitches his mandibles around after watching the ground footage of Sovereign, and the part in the first blade runner when they have the long slow pan in on the Tyrell building leading up to Leons interrogation and Holden blowing huge smoke clouds everywhere.

The facial animation in Mass Effect 1 is super bad and doesn't hold up well compared to even ME2 and 3, but that is a really great moment, yes. It's a subtle little thing but it 1) showed up front that they cared in the right places, and it's a nice little visual cue/tic that says "even the super hardcore space spy is terrified of whatever the gently caress this thing is."

nine-gear crow
Aug 10, 2013

low vis




mind the walrus posted:

The example SFDebris points out-- and his review is great incidentally you should watch it-- is that during the production the writers got a note from the studio questioning the fundamental questions of the movie: why are we meant to be sympathizing with the Ba'ku when they're not even natives of the planet, hoarding the magic healing bullshit? These are the studio people. The money people. The "don't care if it's art or even good, as long as it gets us paid in the end" people. They saw the holes right away.

What will always steam me is that there's a really great version of the same story where you make the Ba'ku less sympathetic and lovely production-wise, and basically make TNG: Civil War with the crew split and fighting each other.

But alas.

I sometimes wish Michael Pillar's original idea for Insurrection, outlined in Fade In made it to production instead of him getting talked out of it by basically everyone around him. It sounds like it would have been a lot more interesting than the finished product we got was. It was basically Heart of Darkness in space, and the Col. Kurtz stand in who was in control of the magic healing bullshit planet was an exploitative unsympathetic rear end in a top hat and Picard has to go rogue to stop him.

nine-gear crow
Aug 10, 2013

low vis




Pennywise the Frown posted:

Does that game work on modern systems ok? How does it hold up?

It's up on Steam and Good Old Games now along with the rest of the LucasArts Star Wars collection, and there's a really great mod, The X-Wing Alliance Upgrade Project that's been working for 20 years now to keep the game up to speed with modern standards. Between those, yes it really holds up.

nine-gear crow
Aug 10, 2013

low vis





Something I noticed watching that gif is you can see the transport fire up its engines to make the jump to lightspeed, but it smashes into the Devastator just before it can accelerate, probably because its NaviComputer's safeties engaged when it detected the ship in front of it. If the Star Destroyer came out of hyperspace like even half a second later than it did, it would have been Holdo'd into oblivion and probably taken out the Death Star then and there with its shrapnel.

Adbot
ADBOT LOVES YOU

nine-gear crow
Aug 10, 2013

low vis




Arcsquad12 posted:

At least the Vaygr are still alien. And they have the best looking ships and the best theme music.

You see Makaan's face in one of the cutscenes. The Vagyr are definitely human too. It's the Turanic Raiders who are described, at least in Cataclysm's manual, as being vaguely aquatic reptilian, and how their cockpits were filled with this weird teal-coloured fluid that would spray everywhere in space when they were punctured.

I do, however, kind of of appreciate the implied idea with everyone being more or less human in the Homeworld universe that galactic civilization originated on like one or two planets and one race has been spacefaring for so long that it's managed to fracture into multiple disparate empires that have been around for thousands of years themselves now and are as alien to one another as they are to the actual aliens out there in the universe as well.

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • Post
  • Reply