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TheAardvark
Mar 3, 2019



Post your favorite book related memories ITT

I was thinking about this because of the childrens' lit discussion in the general thread.

I spent a summer with my grandma in her tiny town without a real library when I was like 9, and ran out of reading material pretty fast. She had a vast collection of books and I ended up reading both Call of the Wild and White Fang for the first time there.

Another would be the first time I ever did an all-night book read and ended up having zero sleep for school - some Agatha Christie novel. I don't even remember which one it was anymore but I remember being so glad I finished it before the sun came up.

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TheAardvark
Mar 3, 2019



i saw my first ever bever in Breakfast of Champions

IMB
Jan 8, 2005
How does an asshole like Bob get such a great kitchen?

TheAardvark posted:

Post your favorite book related memories ITT

I was thinking about this because of the childrens' lit discussion in the general thread.

I spent a summer with my grandma in her tiny town without a real library when I was like 9, and ran out of reading material pretty fast. She had a vast collection of books and I ended up reading both Call of the Wild and White Fang for the first time there.

Another would be the first time I ever did an all-night book read and ended up having zero sleep for school - some Agatha Christie novel. I don't even remember which one it was anymore but I remember being so glad I finished it before the sun came up.

When I was 12 or so my dad's job got transferred to this lovely little town in the middle of nowhere. It was one of those "do this for a year then come back to a promotion" things. But it sucked. Anyway in the middle of June my mom drove my brother and I to this town to look for a house to rent. To pass the time, I bought Jurassic Park to read as we drove around. At one point, after who knows how long of house hunting, we stopped on one of those small town middle america main streets. I think there was a realtor office or something she wanted to go in, and my brother went with her. I was 200 pages deep at this point and just being completely brain-melted by this book so I declined to join.

They were gone a long time. I was entranced in the book. Suddenly I was like man I'm not feeling well. Of course I was inside the car in the middle of summer. I can't remember the window situation, I'm guessing they were down because my mom was not insane, but she was stressed about the move so who knows. Maybe they were up and she probably thought the trip inside was gonna be short and of course she figured her dumbass son would be smart enough to get out of the boiling car.

But I wasn't. I start to catch on but it's too late. I get out of the car (book in hand) and I was so out of it I couldn't make my legs go the right way, so I was just wobbling all over this sidewalk. I vomited and it took the strength out of my legs. I fell against a chain link fence and passed out. I came too to an older couple fanning me off and yelling for someone to call 911. I had ended up like two blocks the wrong direction, and I didn't know the town, so I couldn't figure out where the car was. Eventually we heard my mom screaming and we sheepishly drove off. I finished the book before we found a house.

Ytlaya
Nov 13, 2005

0.000% of Communism has been built. Evil child-murdering billionaires still rule the world with a shit-eating grin.

I remember reading Star Wars books in 5th/6th grade (this would be around 1996/1997). I would read them during classes and the teachers would get annoyed. Reading star wars books (and some other random sci-fi/fantasy like this thing, which I think was also written by a guy who did some of the Star Wars books - https://www.amazon.com/Heroes-Die-F...k/dp/B001MYA38W ) was basically my main source of entertainment and I would always be super excited after finding something new at Barnes and Noble.

Another kind of amusing book memory is the time I read Rainbow Six in 1998 or 1999. I remember thinking it was really hardcore and Adult. The only specific thing I remember is there being some line about peoples' heads "exploding like overripe watermelons." I went on to use this phrase in a Starcraft "battle report" a year or two later*: "At first my Hydras exploded like overripe watermelons at the wrath of the sunkens, but once they formed their distinctive half circle of destrucion the sunkens were goners."

* http://www.battlereports.com/viewre...?reportnum=2621 (it's amazing this site still exists and has these battle reports I wrote when I was 14-15; it's basically the ancestor of Let's Plays)

Ytlaya fucked around with this message at 20:20 on Jul 5, 2020

Cephas
May 11, 2009

Shape Shift With Me


I read Murakami's Hear the Wind Sing on my Nook one afternoon during summer at college. All my roommates were home for the summer, so I would keep the living room blinds closed and play the original Dark Souls and watch Twin Peaks. I was reading the book at the campus breezeway, which was a little roofed commercial strip with circular stone seats and small trees. There was a summer downpour that lasted for hours, but the breezeway had restrooms and vending machines, so I sat by the edge and read the whole book and looked out at the afternoon storm.

ConfusedUs
Feb 24, 2004

Bees?
You want fucking bees?
Here you go!
ROLL INITIATIVE!!


I got SO MANY free pizzas from the Book It program.

Free pizza for something I was gonna do anyway? Sign me the gently caress up!

Selachian
Oct 9, 2012



That's one of the reasons I prefer physical books. A lot of the books I've acquired have memories associated with them. For instance, I have my dad's collection of the Harvard Classics (dark green and gold binding) shelved next to my desk, with the Aesop / Grimm / Andersen volume spine head ripped off because I kept pulling it off the shelf as a kid. (Kids: don't form the habit of pulling books off the shelf by hooking the spine head with your finger.) Another volume has tooth marks put there by my first puppy.

I was looking through my copy of The World Encyclopedia of Comics the other night. It's an unabridged-dictionary-size book, nearly 800 pages. When I was a kid, my record for taking books out of the library was 25 books at one time, including the World Encyclopedia of Comics, and then I managed to schlep the whole load uphill three blocks and down one, which was the distance between home and library.



This is the first joke book I ever had, and introduced me to the wonderful world of puns, knock-knock jokes, and Tom Swifties, which no doubt contributed to making me completely insufferable as a kid.

cda
Jan 2, 2010


For me it would be tie for first place for each of the 20,000 times I have read a book while having sex.

Ytlaya
Nov 13, 2005

0.000% of Communism has been built. Evil child-murdering billionaires still rule the world with a shit-eating grin.

Oh, another thing I remember from elementary school is Accelerated Reader, where you would take these computer tests on books and answer questions about them (with more points for longer/harder books).

I remember that the only person with more points than me was this Chinese girl in my class, and I got really salty about her gaming the system by skimming long books.

ConfusedUs
Feb 24, 2004

Bees?
You want fucking bees?
Here you go!
ROLL INITIATIVE!!


Ytlaya posted:

Oh, another thing I remember from elementary school is Accelerated Reader, where you would take these computer tests on books and answer questions about them (with more points for longer/harder books).

I remember that the only person with more points than me was this Chinese girl in my class, and I got really salty about her gaming the system by skimming long books.

I was the top AR kid in my school until third or fourth grade when we stopped doing them.

Selachian
Oct 9, 2012



Ytlaya posted:

Oh, another thing I remember from elementary school is Accelerated Reader, where you would take these computer tests on books and answer questions about them (with more points for longer/harder books).

I remember that the only person with more points than me was this Chinese girl in my class, and I got really salty about her gaming the system by skimming long books.

Heh. I'm old enough to remember having the original SRA set in elementary school, although none of my teachers made any organized use of it.

During filmstrips or movies in class, I used to sometimes excuse myself to "go to the reading room" instead. At that time, I didn't realize it was the room for remedial reading classes -- I just thought it was a place I could go to grab something to read for a while. Now I wonder what the remedial reading teacher made of me occasionally wandering into their room.

TheAardvark
Mar 3, 2019



My first e-reader was a decade ago, a Kindle Keyboard, a hand-me-down from my girlfriend's mother. I was a broke as gently caress college student with a huge backlog of to-reads, and I suddenly had access to everything. I buy everything now, but at 20 with a bank account in the double digits, piracy was a godsend. I think the first book I read that way was Wizard and Glass, which wasn't at my library or available for transfer. I had it for a few weeks before I finally wanted to read the book bad enough to just download it.

I kept swapping between kindle piracy and the library out of guilt for 3 or 4 years until I could afford to buy everything. I've bought nearly all of the stuff I pirated back then, but it's hard to feel guilt about a time I was eating ramen and bologna sandwiches and working 2 jobs.

Hieronymous Alloy
Jan 30, 2009


Why! Why!! Why must you refuse to accept that Dr. Hieronymous Alloy's Genetically Enhanced Cream Corn Is Superior to the Leading Brand on the Market!?!



Morbid Hound

Who was it said, that they had clearer memories of the Battle of the Pelennor Fields, than of many incidents in their own life?

I probably remember reading The Hobbit for the first time more clearly than I do the rest of that entire year of my life.

Mister Kingdom
Dec 14, 2005

And the tears that fall
On the city wall
Will fade away
With the rays of morning light

When I was a junior in high school (1979, yeah I'm old, get out of my yard!), the librarian at my school took a liking to me for some reason and gave me a copy of The World According to Garp to read. She said she figured I was mature enough to handle the adult situations in the book. It was the first "adult" book I had ever read.

A few years later after graduating, she was clearing out old books to make room for new ones and came across a sci-fi book I had checked out on numerous occassions, When Worlds Collide/After Worlds Collide. She went out of her way to bring it to me instead of tossing it even though it wasn't in the greatest condition.

taiyoko
Jan 10, 2008




Ytlaya posted:

Oh, another thing I remember from elementary school is Accelerated Reader, where you would take these computer tests on books and answer questions about them (with more points for longer/harder books).

I remember that the only person with more points than me was this Chinese girl in my class, and I got really salty about her gaming the system by skimming long books.

We had that in our middle school (did for years after, until the librarian who really pushed it retired ) and on top of that, he would purchase all sorts of goodies that we could buy with the points we got from AR. Most kids spent theirs on candy and stuff. In 8th grade, I became the first person to have earned 1000+ points in a single school year and got myself a $100 savings account at a local bank with it. My record wouldn't be broken for like 10 years after that, and I set it before Harry Potter was even a thing yet. But I could burn through 2 5-point Nancy Drew or Hardy Boys books in a single school day. IIRC the books with the most points we had back then were War and Peace and Gone With The Wind, and as someone who was mainly into sci-fi and fantasy, gently caress reading either of those.

Khizan
Jul 30, 2013



taiyoko posted:

In 8th grade, I became the first person to have earned 1000+ points in a single school year and got myself a $100 savings account at a local bank with it.

I did this at my school and my reward was a basketball.

Ms Boods
Mar 19, 2009

Did you ever wonder where the Romans got bread from? It wasn't from Waitrose!


Selachian posted:

Heh. I'm old enough to remember having the original SRA set in elementary school, although none of my teachers made any organized use of it.


Oh wow, I haven't thought of the SRA in over 40 years -- your post made me suddenly vividly remember that colour-coded box!


Ytlaya posted:

I remember reading Star Wars books in 5th/6th grade (this would be around 1996/1997).

I was 11 going on 12 the summer Star Wars came out, and we had to drive to King of Prussia (just outside of Philadelphia) to see it, as there were no first run theatres closer to where I lived. There was no merchandising or anything associated with it like you get now, but a novelisation of the film came out (which I still have somewhere in storage). I remember being stuck in this awful caravan at the beach with my parents, reading and rereading this book -- all of my associations are with the damp, sandy mattress in the room I had as a bedroom, listening to traffic and people passing by within inches of the room all evening and into the night (the caravan park was between the dunes and the main highway, Fenwick Island, DE, just before the state line to Maryland, if anyone knows that era).

My parents were much older than average when I was born, so it was more like growing up with almost-grandparents -- we stayed in the caravan in the off-season, so whilst it was still autumnal/Indian summer warm during the day, it got pretty chilly especially at night. My parents would go to bed early, and there was no TV reception. Despite it sounding a bit grim, my associations with the book, being wrapped up in a cosy blanket, listening to passersby grow fewer and fewer as the evening faded into night, the close-by waves breaking on the beach, reading what I thought at the time was one of the coolest things ever...it's a good memory.

Lots of good reading memories as I've been an avid reader since the days of picture books and Berenstain Bears. I loved when we'd get those flimsy Scholastic book order forms (this was back in the 1970s); my mom would buy anything I ticked off. It was always a great day when you went into the classorom and there was a little pile of books on your desk. I still have a lot of them! I've in the years since chased up first editions of some of them -- Scholastic tended to edit the gently caress out of books, so it's been a huge pleasure to find a first, original edition of a favourite childhood book and there are new scenes and conversations edited from the originals. Scholastic used to (re)publish a lot of British children's books and totally change them for American kids.

I had to switch to a crap Catholic school in the 5th grade, and was really disappointed that they didn't do the Scholastic thing. The other kids thought I was weird because I liked to read so much Ah, gently caress'em -- I read everything in the teachers' classrooms for silent reading and book reports, and went through the entire library (which was only like a 6 x 8 cubby).

The library in my high school was one of my favourite hiding places; I spent a heck of a lot of free periods way in the back in the stacks, often hanging out with a pal. The librarian liked me, so she let us watch videos on the then Very Expensive VCR (lots of PBS stuff and RSC plays, but, kids, David Robb was hot in Hamlet. When I graduated, she let me take any book from the library that I wanted as a graduation gift, so I took a 19th century copy of Hamlet

Lucas Archer
Dec 1, 2007
Falling...

This is kinda dumb, but here goes. This is mid-90's.

I lived overseas because my dad was in the military, so the only bookstore I had access to was the Base Exchange, which has let's just say a "limited" selection. Anyway, I was (still am) a big fantasy nerd and I had just finished reading Tolkein and Eddings, and was looking for something new.

Well, I found a book in the bookstore that looked really interesting. It was called "The Great Hunt" by Robert Jordan. The cover art looked interesting, it was really thick so it was obviously good, and I had just enough money to buy it. I grab it and take it home and start reading. Well, I don't know how I missed it but I quickly realized I was jumping in the middle of a story. Oops, this is the SECOND book in the series. So I put it on my shelf. I tell myself I'm going to wait until I read the first one to read the second one, and I just have to wait until it's available at the BX.

Six months later, I finally get the first book in the series. During that six months, I probably took that book off my shelf three or four times a week and just stared at the cover art, imagining what the Great Hunt could possibly be, who those characters were, what's the deal with that cool looking horn? I daydreamed in school about that loving book, what it could possibly be about, based on nothing but the title and cover art.

I devoured The Eye of the World when I finally got it. Then I turned to The Great Hunt and I vividly remember being in my bed at 10:30PM with a flashlight, beginning to read, and feeling tears come to my eyes I was just so loving excited. I still can't think of that book objectively since thinking about it consumed so much brainpower when I was younger.

Hieronymous Alloy
Jan 30, 2009


Why! Why!! Why must you refuse to accept that Dr. Hieronymous Alloy's Genetically Enhanced Cream Corn Is Superior to the Leading Brand on the Market!?!



Morbid Hound

Selachian posted:

Heh. I'm old enough to remember having the original SRA set in elementary school, although none of my teachers made any organized use of it.

During filmstrips or movies in class, I used to sometimes excuse myself to "go to the reading room" instead. At that time, I didn't realize it was the room for remedial reading classes -- I just thought it was a place I could go to grab something to read for a while. Now I wonder what the remedial reading teacher made of me occasionally wandering into their room.

My school library had like half of the Time Life Books "Mysteries of the Unknown" series. The vampire one *really* stuck in my head.

Lucas Archer posted:

This is kinda dumb, but here goes. This is mid-90's.

I lived overseas because my dad was in the military, so the only bookstore I had access to was the Base Exchange, which has let's just say a "limited" selection. Anyway, I was (still am) a big fantasy nerd and I had just finished reading Tolkein and Eddings, and was looking for something new.

Well, I found a book in the bookstore that looked really interesting. It was called "The Great Hunt" by Robert Jordan. The cover art looked interesting, it was really thick so it was obviously good, and I had just enough money to buy it. I grab it and take it home and start reading. Well, I don't know how I missed it but I quickly realized I was jumping in the middle of a story. Oops, this is the SECOND book in the series. So I put it on my shelf. I tell myself I'm going to wait until I read the first one to read the second one, and I just have to wait until it's available at the BX.

Six months later, I finally get the first book in the series. During that six months, I probably took that book off my shelf three or four times a week and just stared at the cover art, imagining what the Great Hunt could possibly be, who those characters were, what's the deal with that cool looking horn? I daydreamed in school about that loving book, what it could possibly be about, based on nothing but the title and cover art.

I devoured The Eye of the World when I finally got it. Then I turned to The Great Hunt and I vividly remember being in my bed at 10:30PM with a flashlight, beginning to read, and feeling tears come to my eyes I was just so loving excited. I still can't think of that book objectively since thinking about it consumed so much brainpower when I was younger.

High school wheel of time summer vacation was good fuckin' times

Hieronymous Alloy fucked around with this message at 18:44 on Jul 24, 2020

Lex Neville
Apr 15, 2009


When I was 13 the day after I came back from holiday I was feeling unwell in a way I never had before so I stayed in bed all day reading Im Westen nichts Neues and then it turned to be appendicitis

Famethrowa
Oct 5, 2012



I was the target generation for Harry Potter, and I remember 5th grade queuing up for the 4th book, getting that hardcover brick in my hands, and just smelling the new pages.

Got home, and spent the next 7 hours reading and finishing it in my lovely bunkbed next to the fishtank. It was everything I wanted.

Kestral
Nov 24, 2000

Forum Veteran

Clapping Larry

I went to a Montessori elementary school for a couple years when I was 7-8, that had a wooden structure on its grounds, tucked away among some oaks, the kind that is essentially just treated lumber fastened together and filled with odds and ends for child enrichment. I donít remember the first floor at all, probably a play-space of some kind, but I do remember that you could climb up a little ladder and end up in a loft that, to a seven-year-old, seemed quite spacious. It was dusty and warm, and it smelled pleasantly of wood, dirt, trees, and books.

Iím not clear on how all those books ended up there Ė maybe kids brought them from the library and just abandoned them in the loft, maybe the staff kept it stocked with books for kids to pick up on a whim (which seems like a very Montessori thing to do), but the place had a bunch of books at any given them, and it made that loft the best place on the school grounds for me. School wasnít working out well for me, I was the kid who was done way ahead of everyone else and terminally bored as a result, and by the end of third grade I would be doing homeschooling. But one of the only vivid, positive memories I have of my years in the school system is of being in that loft on a warm afternoon with the sunlight making the dust motes dance lazily in shafts of light, while reading the beautiful old hardcover version of Jane Langtonís The Diamond in the Window. Iím convinced that was a formative moment, and I think about it a lot these days: how the big formative moments can also be so quiet and subtle and private, especially for children.

Daikloktos
Jan 1, 2020
warning: i get triggered by extremely stupid shit

Lex Neville posted:

When I was 13 the day after I came back from holiday I was feeling unwell in a way I never had before so I stayed in bed all day reading Im Westen nichts Neues and then it turned to be appendicitis
It bothers me I can't remember if this is somehow ironic

PlushCow
Oct 19, 2005

The cow eats the grass


Hieronymous Alloy posted:

High school wheel of time summer vacation was good fuckin' times

Hell yeah, same. Everytime a new Wheel of Time book was out it would consume all my free time until finished, from dawn to nighttime and then some if a flashlight was handy.

One strong reading-related memory was long long ago when I was going through some tough health problems, nearly crippling chronic pain, and reading was the only thing I could consistently do to entertain myself without difficulty. Books could distract me from the pain in a way that pills could not and for that I was ever thankful.

Ugly In The Morning
Jul 1, 2010

Don't look at me-
I'm ugly in the morning
When the headaches gone
The sun is not.
Forgot to turn the alarm
On - on




Pillbug

When I lived in Brooklyn I had an hour long subway commute each way, and those two hours of sitting there with my kindle, powering through three books at once were the only reliable bright spot in my time there. Iíd have a novel, a short story collection, and a nonfiction book going at once so I always had something I was in the mood for ready to go. I powered through 163 books in the year I lived there.

Lex Neville
Apr 15, 2009


Daikloktos posted:

It bothers me I can't remember if this is somehow ironic

it's not. it's just a memorable reading experience

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Hyrax Attack!
Jan 13, 2009

We demand to be taken seriously


During a summer my sister got a stack of books from the library and one was Vertical Run. I was the right age and hadnít seen Die Hard so it was a fun thriller to go through in a day.

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