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Kenning
Jan 10, 2009

I really want to post goatse. I wish I had 10bux




The last cigar/pipe thread was closed and the OP blanked b/c OP came back from a 2 year hiatus to get mad at Lowtax. While that's an admirable instinct, we still need a place for goons to talk about smoking big dick analogs and to use words like Frog Morton maduro aromatic burley ligero and poo poo. Plus the thread was 10 years old and got moved to TCC in like 2016 which was bullshit. We started a new thread in GBS, but the consensus was that was an error, so here we are! I copied the old OP.

I've smoked cigars here and there since 2015 or so, but I've gotten seriously into it during the Coronavirus lockdowns, since my buddies and I will hop on a video chat and smoke together instead of hanging out in person. It's a pretty good time .

Cigars

Cigars are, at base, a bunch of tobacco rolled inside of one big leaf of tobacco. This is probably a very old way of getting your nicotine, but modern cigars got their earliest start in the 16th century, becoming wildly popular in the 19th and early 20th centuries, and fading for a long time until the 1990s, when a brief cigar boom led to a bunch of new brands and a few new styles.

Cuban cigars

Cuba is the country most famously associated with cigars, and they still have a thriving industry that is well regarded. However, the Cuban Revolution led to a lot of cigar makers fleeing the island and setting up elsewhere, with the result that there are excellent cigar manufacturers all over the Caribbean. Nicaragua is probably the most important cigar manufacturing country, followed closely by the Dominican Republic and Honduras. Cuba still makes great cigars, but it's not the be-all end-all. For some great info about Cubans, see the bottom of this post!

Types of cigars

Most of what we're talking about in this thread are so-called "premium" cigars. Premium cigars are all rolled by hand, generally using fine tobacco, and following certain styles. It's what most people think of when you say "cigar". Machine-rolled cigars are much less expensive, generally use lower quality tobacco, tend to be smaller, and are often (but not always) flavored and/or sweetened.

Hand-rolled cigars (from now on, just "cigars") have 3 main components, the wrapper, the binder, and the filler. These are often mixed-and-matched from different regions, different seed lines, and different processing styles to produce a specific experience. This blending (along with the construction of the cigar) is what makes each cigar different.

Wrapper: this is the most important leaf, and is overwhelmingly the most expensive part of the cigar. Wrapper leaves are usually 10x the price of the binder and filler leaves, since they need to be flawless, uniform, and just the right size in order to properly roll the cigar. The wrapper determines the color of the cigar, and a lot of its flavor. There are endless layers of Connecticut wrappers, Connecticut seed wrappers from Ecuador, Habano wrappers from Nicaragua, Brazilian Habano oscuro etc. etc. to learn about when you start delving into cigars.

Besides their provenance, wrappers are described according to their level of ripeness/fermentation/color. These range from green for candela/double claro wrappers, through various shades of tan for claro and colorado, dark brown for maduro, and all the way to almost black for oscuro/double maduro. Generally speaking lighter-colored wrappers are grassy, woody, and sometimes creamy and sometimes peppery, while darker wrappers get richer, more intense, and sweeter.

Binder: binder leaves tend to be sturdier than wrappers, since they keep the filler leaves in place and provide structure to the cigar. The binder leaf can have blemishes and irregularities, since it is hidden by the wrapper. It is often the same type of leaf as the wrapper, just a lower grade, but it's fairly common to see a different binder used to add character to the cigar.

Filler: filler tobacco makes up most of the cigar. Inexpensive cigars will use crumbled or chopper filler, higher-end cigars use long-leaf fillers, which contribute to a more even and consistent burn. Filler is occasionally described according to its priming. A "priming" is a set of leaves that is harvested from a tobacco plant. The harvest starts at the bottom of the plant and works up to the top over the course of the harvest season, which can take weeks. The lower primings are more delicate and burn more easily, whereas the top primings are heavier-duty and more slow-burning. Most commonly a brand will advertise its "ligero" filler, which is the top priming that has the most intense nicotine and flavor. The lower "seco" and "viso/volado" primings are usually not specifically mentioned, although generally a combination of the three types is present in a blend.

Vitola (shape)

Cigars have an open end, which gets lit and is called the "foot", and a closed end, which is cut or punctured to smoke through, called the "cap". In between there are a variety of lengths, thicknesses (usually referred to as "ring gauge" or "band"), and shapes which are collectively called the "vitola". Usually a given cigar make will come in several different vitolas, each of which will be slightly different in terms of flavor development and smoking time. The common shape, with straight sides and a rounded cap is called a parejo, while other shapes (such as a pointed or "torpedo" tip, or a bulging "perfecto" shape) are called figurado cigars.

The length of cigars is generally measured in inches, and the ring gauge is in 64ths of an inch (which measures the diameter of the cigar). Therefore you'll often see cigars described as 6x52, i.e. 6 inches long by 52/64's of an inch in diameter, etc. The trend lately is toward larger cigars with bigger ring gauges, with the toro (generally around 6x52) the most popular shape in 2019. Many posters in this thread prefer narrower ring gauges, but the fact is that there are great cigars at all different sizes, although if you're gonna get something big like a 6x60 gordo you should make sure you have a couple hours to kill smoking it.

Storing cigars

Cigars are a bit delicate, and its loving annoying. To stay in good condition, they should be kept at around 65%-69% humidity and around 70 degrees F. There are elaborate, decorative humidors that can serve this purpose, but most goons keep their cigars in coolers or sealed plastic totes with humidity beads to keep it steady and cheap hygrometers to meter it. This box with this humidity pack and this hygrometer will get you started just fine. If kept in proper conditions, cigars will improve with age and are worth setting aside if you can manage to not smoke them all.

Keep in mind, if you're going to buy 1 or 2 cigars and smoke them within a week or so, a humidor isn't really necessary. You only need to get into storage if you've got enough cigars that it might take you several weeks to smoke them, since that's plenty of time for them to dry out under normal conditions.

Smoking cigars

Most cigars take between 45 and 90 minutes to smoke. Larger, more densely-constructed cigars can last up to 3 hours, while smaller, looser cigars can be fully smoked in a half hour. While you can relight a cigar that has died down a bit while you've been smoking it, it's really not possible to set a cigar down, let it go out entirely, and then pick it up the next day. To start with you need to slice or puncture the cap so you can draw air through the cigar. Different cigar cutters will make a straight cut, a V-cut, or punch a hole through the cap. Choosing the right cut for a cigar is a matter of experience and preference. Then you light the foot, ideally with a butane torch lighter. You can "toast" the foot by holding it above the flame and rotating it to get the tobacco heated before lighting. After toasting, rotate the cigar and puff quickly while it's in the flame to light it evenly. Once it's lit, leave it sit for anywhere from 30 seconds to a couple minutes between puffs. Too much smoking can burn the tobacco and lead to char and off flavors. Too little, and your cherry can get cold and you get incomplete combustion and an unsatisfying smoke. It takes a bit of experience, but eventually you'll be able to keep your cigar nicely lit without getting too hot. Let the ash build up as you smoke, since the ash insulates the cherry, providing a more even burn, and cools the smoke. I usually only ash my cigar once or twice, depending on the vitola.

An important note: premium cigars are not supposed to be inhaled. Pull into your mouth like drinking a thick milkshake to taste the flavors of the smoke before exhaling. Depending on the cigar, you can also get a very satisfying nicotine buzz this way.

An important note: cigar butts smell loving awful. I don't recommend throwing them away inside your house if you can avoid it. I have no idea why the butts smell so bad when active cigar smoke is fairly pleasant, but just be cognizant of that downside.

Buying cigars

If you're curious about trying a cigar, I recommend going to a brick-and-mortar (B&M) tobacco shop and just buying one or two to try. They'll often also have cutters and torch lighters for sale. Total Wine and BevMo both also have cigar selections (Total Wine is much better in my experience). Singles at a B&M tend to be $9-$15 for good premium cigars.

If you've decided to get more into cigars and want to save a bit of money vs. buying singles at a B&M shop, there are some great websites to check out. If you've got a good eye for promotions and deals, you can get excellent cigars online for $4-$10 per, although you're generally buying packs of several at a time.

Cigars International has a wide selection and pretty normal prices for an online vendor. They also have rotating deals and all sorts of varying promotions, so it's worth keeping an eye out. CI is great for samplers if you want to try a variety of cigars at decent price.

Cigar Page has less glitz than CI, but the prices are lower overall, and some of their sales have been totally incredible. Definitely worth a browse. That said, some posters have gotten very dry cigars from them, and they might be a bit on the sketchy side (also it's a chud website for sure).

Cigar Bid is more complicated than the previous two. They use Yankee-style auctions to sell individual lots of cigars, as well as a "price fall" sales thing for different lots. It's a little confusing at first, but once you figure out how it works it's a great way to try a bunch of singles for much cheaper than normal, although I warn you that bidding on single cigars can get addictive.

Some extra info on Cigar Bid:

Dramatika posted:

CigarBid is a weird animal - it's loving great for getting accessories for a good price - I got some sweet Xikar lighters and cutters for under 25% MSRP. However, if you're going to use it, you 100% need to do a couple things -

1) Set your shipping to once a week - due to the way shipping costs work there, you're paying pretty much the same shipping for 1 item or 10 as long as their on the same invoice. Keep this in mind, and stop buying poo poo once your shipping day hits.
2) Have an idea what you're bidding on, and what it goes for. Ignore MSRP - search it on Cigars International (Their parent company) and make sure you aren't going above what CI is selling for. Also maybe search it on a couple other sites. I've seen Padron x000 series going for 2-4 bucks a stick more than MSRP in bidding wars, when you could have just straight ordered them without loving around with bidding, or even picked them up at a local B&M. Also, keep in mind that MSRP doesn't mean much - I think there's some brands that stick an abnormally high MSRP on their sticks to make them stick out, and then just always have a huge sale. A $25 MSRP stick that is always on sale for $10 is probably not any better a $10 cigar that sells for $10. YMMV though.
3) Freefalls are pretty sweet. Spend a couple minutes to watch the timer bottom out a couple times so you have an idea of what price point to buy at. Note that its slightly randomized, but ends around withing about a $3 range in my experience. Don't chase the extra $3, it's not worth the time.

Unfortunately, CigarBid has by far the worst packaging of anyone I've ordered from. Personally, I've just gotten poo poo that's lazily packed, but not damage. There are some horrible photos going around of the packages from them some guys are receiving though.

Note also that several posters have received extremely dry and/or cracked cigars from Cigar Bid. It seems that intact boxes tend to arrive in the best shape as a rule. Singles and packs (of 5-50) are more likely to be damaged or dry.

Famous Smoke/Cigar Auctioneer: Poster Lyon says that these sites have better sampler options and are slightly cheaper than CI/CB, although the exclusives are so-so. Apparently customer service is also quite good. In my experience you're less likely to get ridiculously cheap per-cigar prices on CA vs. Cigar Bid, but the selection of offerings is better and they arrive in better shape.

Holt's apparently has great packing and a nice selection of things that can be hard-to-find elsewhere. However, again, their "exclusives" are mostly not worth the money.

I'll add more online resources if people mention them.

Where to start

I'll add specific recommendations for starting out later, but for now, some decent brands to look at if you'd like to get your feet wet:

My Father (Flor de Las Antillas for a punchy, spicy smoke)
Oliva (Serie V is apparently quite good)
Nub (get a Cameroon or Connecticut if you're starting out!)
Padron (I've loved their maduros)
Rocky Patel (you can get factory seconds for an excellent price at CI)

I would personally recommend avoiding Gurkha cigars. They spend a huge amount of money on promotion, and their main gimmick is a super high MSRP which is then discounted to make their cigars seem like a great deal. I've never met a Gurkha I loved, and I tried a few when I was getting started. Also their founder is a racist. Spend your money elsewhere!

If you want something mellow, look for a Connecticut wrapper. If you like spicy, a Habano or Nicaragua is decent. For rich and sweet or bittersweet, look for a darker maduro wrapper. Beyond that, a lot of this is subjective, so your best bet is to just start trying stuff out. I recommend keeping notes so you can remember which brands you liked, especially if you can take note of the wrapper and fillers. I have a spreadsheet tracking off of this, but that's not necessary.

I'll reserve the next post for pipe smoking info, in case a pipegoon wants to do a pipe smoking effortpost. I'll also add pictures to the OP later.

Final note on health: smoking is bad for you. Pipe and cigar smokers generally don't inhale, which appears to make it somewhat less awful for you than smoking cigarettes and hookah. But you know, fun stuff is sometimes dangerous . Smoke a pipe or a cigar per day or less on average and it appears to be relatively moderate.

Info on Cubans from S-tier poster NewFatMike

NewFatMike posted:

If I can take a sec to share some experience for folks willing to dive in to Habanos, I hope this can save some time/confusion/headache:

Global demand for Habanos exceeds production capacity. I've heard a bunch of rumors about how this impacts the nitty gritty of manufacturing, but there are a few "for sure" things that should be known:

1) Because of this demand, cigars don't get their traditional "rest" period after being wrapped. Cigars are live cultures, and this rest period is so the fermentation can continue its work. If you have a smoke that tastes like ammonia or has a super effervescent sharpness to it, it's a sign that it needs to rest. The important take-away is that if you get a box, check the code on the bottom. It'll have a date format on there, make sure it's at least 1 year old, preferably 2.

2) This demand impacts QA, if you don't have a PerfecDraw, get one. Some boxes are totally fine, some are geficht, and there's no "real" way to know until you're sucking a golfball through a crazy straw. The PerfecDraw pays for itself super quick, even on non-Habanos! Every time I grab a Habano, I make sure I have the PerfecDraw on me.

Regarding which ones to check out, I've kicked around a bunch of marcas and vitolas on a budget. There is definitely a "Cuban profile" and each marca touches it in different ways. Hay, salty/ocean air, light wood, and a mineral flavor are all parts of the terroire of Habanos. If you're balling on a budget, I have a list for you! And luckily these are in lower demand than the big popular ones so your odds of getting a decent box code are somewhat higher:

1) Por Larranaga Montecarlos: These are long, skinny, and are very much a "core" kind of Habano for me - the blend has a similar profile to H. Upmann, Montecristo, and my best recollection of Romeo y Julieta. On the milder side, creamy, and the mineral & salty flavors are very present. If you don't like lanceros or panetelas, though, skip these.

2) H. Upmann Regalias: Similar to above, these are permanent members of my humidor. If you want an entree to the marca, these are purestrain Upmann, and it'll give you an idea of what everything uplabel is. Like the PL Montes, they are creamy & mineral-y, but I remember them being a little more robust in profile.

3) Jose L. Piedra Cazadores: Don't get the smaller ones. These are mixed filler (long & short filler) and cheaper than a date with me. The filler construction also means that they burn faster than an equivalently sized long filler. With that out of the way, they punch way above their price point. Creamy, smooth, and mild they're kind of a diet Romeo y Julieta. I try to keep a 5x5 of these in my humidor because friends love smoking a Cuban, and you don't have to worry about throwing money away for a fun experience for a friend. I like these especially for not knowing what I feel like smoking because I know it'll be a good time. Use a punch if you can.

4) Ramon Allones Small Club Corona: Petite coronas have a special place in my heart, but these are worth every puff. If you want to see what the spicier side of Cubans is like without shelling out, these are a great way to start. Another member of the marca, Ramon Allones Special Select are the big brother and a ton of folks like having them in the humidor. If you overall like the direction, Partagas & Bolivar are good ones to try experimenting with. Bolivar #2s en tubos are favorites of mine.

Edit 5) Quintero y Hermano: This is a great, mellow, medium body mixed filler cigar. It piques into spicier territory from puff to puff, and construction issues require a PerfecDraw, but goddamn am I enjoying the one I'm smoking this instant. Incredibly cheap, very yummy. Peanut butter, pear, wood, ocean air.

There are oodles of good ones to check out if you're willing to hit the $7+/stick range, but these guys should all be doable at $5/stick or less. There are a ton of samplers, too, that are very much worth checking out! Especially if you can find a coronas sampler, it should be a super good shot.

A quick word on custom rolls: tons of places have these and I generally regard them as fun experiments. There aren't really any good ways to determine if they are actually made in Cuba. If you're super into "Cubans" over a good cigar, just save your energy for something worth being a dork about.

I hope that's helpful! Can't wait to hear everyone's expeditions into Habanos-land.

Kenning fucked around with this message at 04:01 on Sep 15, 2020

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Kenning
Jan 10, 2009

I really want to post goatse. I wish I had 10bux




Here is some extremely elderly pipe info. It's from the old thread, which was started 10 years ago, and even then it was from 2 threads ago. Please, pipegoons, give us modern information:

A Decrepit Senior Goon posted:

PIPE GUIDE
Douglas MacArthur, Carl Sandburg, Albert Einstein, Sherlock Holmes, Robert Oppenheimer, Gandalf, Che Guevara. What do all these men have in common? Their genius was all caused by their pipe smoking. If you really wish to know the history behind pipes and why they're so great, feel free to PM; however, if you're reading this you have at least an interest, so let's get down to it.



Choosing Your FIRST Pipe and FIRST Equipment
This is often confusing for the new pipe smoker, for a bunch of civilizations came up with a bunch of ways to smoke tobacco. Browsing through pipes, you'll see ones made out of wood (probably briar), white stone-ish stuff (hopefully meerschaum), clay, porcelain, corncob, metal, and basically anything that can have things lit on fire inside them. Besides material, it's recommended that you get a medium sized bowl--too small and it overheats quickly but too big and it gets difficult to stay lit for a beginner.

Briar comes from a plant called "tree health," so you know it's good for you. Briar is a good material for pipes since it's fairly water resistant and fire proof. Briars really aren't the ideal pipe to start out with, but you'll most likely end up with one, for they are the most ubiquitous of pipe materials. Briar pipes require a break-in period, so they'll be a bit harsh at first; after enough bowls (the part of the pipe that holds the tobacco or slang for one smoke, e.g. “I smoked two bowls today”) a "cake" will develop and the bite will lessen, while giving a hint of the tobacco that has previously been smoked. Many people are weary of smoking briar pipes too often and will usually have more than one to avoid this. In choosing your briar pipe look for these things: thick walls versus thin ones (good indicator of quality of pipe and helps with heat), waxed finish versus a varnished one (breathes easier), Lexan stem versus a vulcanized one (better for beginners). As for appearance, choose one you like, but be warned that certain styles do offer advantages. Churchwardens, the long pipes of Gandalf, are difficult to keep lit, and straight stemmed pipes will have the excess moisture accumulate in the bowl.

Meerschaum is German for "sea foam" and is mostly found in caves around the Mediterranean. Meerschaum is a good choice since the break in period is shorter than briars and keeps the taste of the tobacco pure, making them great for testing different tobaccos, while briar pipes will affect the taste. Like with briars, feel free to choose a meerschaum pipe based on appearance, but, again, be weary. Meerschaum carved from blocks is superior to those carved from pressed meerschaum, or the scraps that have been crushed and mixed into blocks, but, truth be told, a beginner isn't likely to notice the difference. Meerschaum pipes have two neat features about them: they can be carved in a bunch of neat figures, and with enough smokes they begin to color. These are delicate so be careful.

Clay comes from... you know this. It's surprisingly good for beginners since the taste is neutral, clay can be smoked really hard and won't burn out, it can be smoked continuously, so you can be chain pipe-smoker, and you can just burn out the bowl to clean it. They are also fairly forgiving to a new smoker, meaning it smokes dry and cool even if you aren't smoking it dryly and coolly. Like meerschaums, be careful with these, and be sure not to touch the clay while you're smoking.

Corncob is the center of the plain ol' piece of corn you eat. It is also the material that is used to create many a novice's pipe. They're good for beginners, and usually just them, since they're cheap, durable, easy to clean, and easy to find. This is often a better option than a cheap briar pipe.

Calabash pipes are nice, but quite expensive, so beyond the scope of a beginner's pipe guide.

Most of the other materials are extraordinarily niche or are useless so ignore them unless you have a burning curiosity. Your best bet for which specific pipe is to find a tobacco shop near you and ask. They'll be sure to recommend one you enjoy, since a happy pipe smoker means profit. Ignore filters since the usual pipe smoker doesn't inhale anyway.

You'll also need a pipe tool, pipe cleaners, and a way to light the tobacco. Pipe tools, like lighters and cigar cutters, can range enormously in price, but even the cheapest one will get the job done. The left most part of the tool in the picture above is a tamper and is used to push tobacco down. The middle part is used to loosen up tobacco. And the far right part is used to spoon out ash and tobacco. Just find pipe cleaners at a tobacco shop or order them online, but be sure they are made for pipes—the fun, colorful ones you played with as a child are poor at absorbing liquid. Ignoring lasers and novelties, three ways are usually used to light the tobacco: fluid lighters (think Zippo), butane lighters, and matches. Fluid lighters are the worst of these options, since the chemical leaves a taste, but many claim if you let it burn for a few seconds it's hardly noticeable. Butane lighters are flavorless and a good option, but can badly singe the edge of a pipe. Matches--stay away from paper ones-- are a good option if you let the chemicals burn off the tip for a few seconds.

Tobacco
Aromas vs. Non-aromas. Bad vs. Good. Aromas are flavored tobaccos like cherry or vanilla and are traditionally used by beginner pipe smokers, but you won't fall into that trap. Non-aromatic tobaccos are unsweetened and unflavored, and will be more like cigars than aromas. The quality of the smoke will also be much better, as aromatic tobaccos will smoke wetters because of the additives. Stick with non-aromatic tobaccos for the most part. To be fair, European aromatic tobaccos don't have to be avoided and are much better than their more popular American counterparts. Again, ask your local tobacconist for what he recommends. All the ones in the picture are great if your tobacconist is purely a cigar man.

Pipe tobaccos come in many varieties, depending on the region they're grown in and how they smoke. Here are the most popular:
Burley: Burley has a subtle flavor that is high in nicotine and slow in burning. Because of these features it's often used as a base for other blends.
Cavendish: This term is broad in its meaning, but usually refers to a sweetened tobacco.
Latakia: A spice tobacco cured over smoke, giving its smoky flavor. Commonly found in non-aromatic tobaccos, latakia gives many blends its strong flavor.
Orientals: Another broad term that refers to tobaccos originally grown in the eastern Mediterranean region, and could refer to latakia tobaccos.
Perique: This tobacco's main feature is its distinction. It grows exclusively in St. James Parish, Louisiana; it subjected to extreme pressure and has a unique taste due to that.
Turkish: Like Orientals, it refers to tobaccos grown in a region (yeah, Turkey) and could include many types of tobaccos. You might see varieties of this tobacco, like Basma or Xanthi, but they just refer to the region they're grown in.
Virginia: Not exclusive to Virginia, this tobacco has a high sugar content and is often used in blends. A complex tobacco that ages very well, Virginians are sometimes even smoked straight.

Smoking
"On a damp day, with luck, one might get a light in half an hour." ~Charles Dickens

You have your pipe, tool, lighter, and tobacco. Now is the time to actually do something with all of them. First, dry out your tobacco; just leave it sitting on a napkin for about five minutes. Eventually you can figure out if you prefer it straight from the tin/bag, or if you like it dried for five minutes, or if you like it dried out for a day, but as for now five minutes will help you get a cleaner, drier smoke. Just pack the tobacco into your pipe fairly tightly and scoop it out using the spoon on your tool. You'll probably end up with some excess but that can be put back into the tin.

Now onto the packing, or putting the tobacco into the pipe. This is the hardest part for pipe smokers in general, but eventually you'll find your preferred method and packing a bowl will become second-nature. I'll present the most common way:
Think of it like three layers, with each layer getting packed progressively tighter. For the first layer, trickle tobacco into the bowl until it is full and then use your tamper or finger to press it down to about half full. For the second layer, fill the bowl again, and press down until the pipe is about ¾ full. And for the last layer, overfill it and press down until the tobacco is fairly even with the rim. Press down and feel the tobacco; if it feels springy, that is a good sign. Another way to test the quality of the pack is to suck air through the pipe. You should feel some resistance, but it shouldn't be totally air-tight—-like sipping a straw. If it feels off, start over again, as having to relight repeatedly is much more obnoxious than having to repack.

Now to light the pipe. Puffing gently, bring the flame down to the tobacco and move it in a circle around the tobacco. Do this repeatedly and slowly. The whole surface should be aflame, with your puffing only encouraging it. Congratulations! Well, not quite. This is often called the “false light” or “charring light,” and it serves to prepare for the second light which should let you smoke most of the bowl. Now tamp down using your tool and repeat the lighting process. Puff and tamp lightly to set the embers burning downward. You really can congratulate yourself now.

While smoking, you should tamp down periodically to promote even burning and an even pack. Also, before every relight you should tamp down. Sometimes the ash will be so thick that you need to get rid of some in order to relight. Do this by loosening it with your tool and then scooping some of it out with your tool. Smoking pace is also very important, especially for briar pipes. If you smoke it too quickly, you will experience “tongue bite” and your pipe will heat up. If you hear a gurgling noise from within your pipe it is because you are a) smoking too quickly b) breaking in a new pipe c) smoking a tobacco that is too moist d) saliva has entered the pipe. It helps sometimes to run a pipe cleaner through while still smoking to get rid of the gurgling. If you can't hold your pipe comfortably in your hand, you are smoking too hot and should let it rest for a few minutes. When breaking in a new pipe it is imperative you don't let it get too hot. After some time, the cake will build up and the wood will become more accustomed to it, but you still shouldn't let it too hot. The perfect pace is described as like the pipe is almost always on the verge of going out—to aim for this as a beginner will undoubtedly cause frustration so just smoke at a relaxed pace.

You've now completed your first smoke! Probably with a few hiccups along the way, but there will be less and less the more you smoke. Tongue bite and salivating a lot will also become mere memories once you smoke enough. Time for cleanup. First, spoon or tap out all the ash and unused tobacco in your bowl. Now you need to get one of those pipe cleaners and run it through until you see the little end poking through. Be careful not to ram it against the wall, as it can cause a hole to form. Some people leave the pipe cleaner in over the night, or leave it in until the next smoke, or take it out after cleaning, but this is mostly personal preference. About once a month you'll want to unscrew it—do not do it when the pipe is still warm—and really clean out the stem with a folded up pipe cleaner.

There are loads more advanced topics like aging tobacco (generally a good idea and easy to do), polishing your pipe, and smoking flake tobacco. Feel free to ask the pipe smokers (like Mr. Wiggles and uh, hopefully you eventually) on anything or google around.

Some good websites: http://www.clubstogie.com/vb/forumdisplay.php?f=83 (fairly expansive pipe forum)
http://www.tobaccoreviews.com/index.cfm (good for tobacco reviews)
http://www.smokingpipes.com/pipes/estate/ (good used or “estate” pipe selection)
http://www.cupojoes.com/index.html (good for new pipes)
http://www.pipes.org/ (“the nexus of pipes on the net...” Impressive, no?)

Enjoy!

Kenning fucked around with this message at 06:01 on Jul 10, 2020

Kenning
Jan 10, 2009

I really want to post goatse. I wish I had 10bux




I'm currently working my way through this AJ Fernandez sampler from CI.



So far the San Lotano Oval and the Man o' War Ruination 10th Anniversary were pretty excellent, especially the Man o' War. Thick smoke, creamy and cool, with a flavor like chocolate biscuits. Also oily as hell, it ruled.

Also, today I smoked an Acid Opulence 3 by Drew Estate, one of those infused cigars. It was pretty fun. The sweetened cap was whatever, but the infusion was subtle and nice enough. Not the best cigar I've ever had, but also far from the worst. I can see having a couple of these around to mix it up sometimes.

Kenning
Jan 10, 2009

I really want to post goatse. I wish I had 10bux




That's great info on vendors! I'll add to the OP. I definitely noticed that my orders from Cigar Bid came in on the dry side, and needed a good week in the humidor to be smokeable, unlike the stuff I've gotten from CI (didn't realize that was the parent company!) or Cigar Page.

NewFatMike posted:

Ayyy. Thanks for moving the thread ♥️

Currently having a Flor de Las Antillas Robusto on a slightly long lunch break.

I've been mulling over that Arturo Fuente Añejo Sharks I had the other day, and goddamn that was super delicious. I need to have some later format Tatuaje Havana VI smokes and a La Flor Dominicana Double Ligero. They're all in that decadent, rich, smooth, sweet chocolate territory. They'll be a good comparison.

Man a Flor robusto at lunch sounds extremely chill. I've gotta check out some of those others you mentioned, I'm always down for a decadent cigar.

Post your humidors! It's good to see what other people are working with and get ideas.

I've got that weatherproof tote I linked in the OP.



The old box of Flor de las Antillas maduros is where I keep my gear. I use the Vertigo lighter and Xicar straight cutter in the top left the most often. The little keychain punch cut has also seen plenty of service.



This smells pretty good to open up.





The orange My Father Opulencia box is storing the My Fathers my buddies and I did a box split on, along with a couple of RyJ Romeos. The Gurkha box is for shorter cigars, and there's just a layer of singles on the bottom of the humidor (the tubos are supporting the weight of the boxes). I feel like there's a better long-term solution for keeping my poo poo organized, but this is working okay so far. My humidity has mostly been fine since I switched to just using the Humi-Care beads instead of the Boveda pack.

My buddies and I are meeting up this weekend probably to do a big cigar exchange. They'll be getting some of the AJ Fernandez sampler and a couple others, and I'll be getting a selection of Nubs from the Nuberlode II they got from CI. Looking forward to it.

Kenning
Jan 10, 2009

I really want to post goatse. I wish I had 10bux




Great information about nicotine sickness and sugar, plus tea with cigars. That's a good idea. Also NewFatMike I like your wineador. Something I'll look into once I have a bit more space.

I smoked a Romeo by RyJ toro tonight. I got a fiver of robustos of this cigar a bit ago and really liked them, so I wanted to try the toro. Similar cola/root beer flavors, although there was a strong sort of orange oil zestiness to it that wasn't bad. I think my cigars are still a bit too wet, since I feel like I wasn't getting as much smoke or as even a burn as I'd prefer, or as I'd gotten on the robustos. Still pretty pleasant though. I'm gonna try tossing my equipment box into the humidor to soak up some extra humidity for a few days to see if I can dry things out just a bit and get a stronger smoke going forward.

Kenning
Jan 10, 2009

I really want to post goatse. I wish I had 10bux




Yeah, I've got a hygrometer. My box is hovering around 72%, occasionally spiking to 74%. It's not terrible, but I'd prefer it at or just below 70% I think, given a few smokes I've had recently. I think part of the issue is that I live on the coast, so the ambient humidity is relatively high as a baseline.

Kenning
Jan 10, 2009

I really want to post goatse. I wish I had 10bux




Alright, after having a few pretty unsatisfying smokes in a row it's time for drastic measures. I've put some dry silica beads in a tupperware in my humidor to try and soak up some moisture and see if we can't stabilize at something a little lower. I'm gonna see how low it drops in the next few hours, and then leave it overnight with no humidification. My cigar friends are coming over to hang out on Saturday and I wanna be able to have my stash in better condition by then.

Kenning
Jan 10, 2009

I really want to post goatse. I wish I had 10bux




I had a Boveda 72%, which was the only one I could fine in 320 g size on Amazon. Switched that out for some Humi-Care beads in the little plastic jar, and that seemed to help for a while. The real problem seems to be that my ambient humidity is usually 70%-75% lately, and drying something out is way more complicated than adding humidity. Luckily I've got a big pile of silica beads so I'll experiment with that for a bit.

I might look into a Boveda 69% in a bit. With the dry silica in there right now we're sitting at 69%, which is promising.

Kenning
Jan 10, 2009

I really want to post goatse. I wish I had 10bux




Thanks for the recommendations, I got some of the Boveda 69% packs to try and manage my box. Looking forward to flawless smokes going forward.

Kenning
Jan 10, 2009

I really want to post goatse. I wish I had 10bux




Those Leaf cigars are very cool looking and yeah, I've heard they're quite good. I really want to order from Fox, but because I moved fairly recently they can't verify my age with their automatic system, and don't appear to have the backup verification systems that some of the bigger vendors do. I'll try calling them on Monday, cause my friend's birthday is coming up and they have a culebras I wanna buy to smoke with him and his brother. In any case, I'll add them to the OP.

NewFatMike posted:

Oh yeah, Fox Cigar owns bones.

@Kenning, for a quick fix for you friends, it might be worth pulling some out a few hours ahead of time. "Dry boxing" can be really helpful especially for a short term workaround/company.

Thanks friend! I've been sitting at 67%-69% for the last day and a half, so I'm pretty hopeful that we'll have some decent smokes by midday tomorrow.

Kenning
Jan 10, 2009

I really want to post goatse. I wish I had 10bux




I'm very interested in trying some proper Cubans, they sound...intense.

Today was a Very Good Cigar Day. My buddies came over and we did a big humidor swap. I gave them some AJ Fernandez stuff, they gave me some Nubs etc. It ended up being a 3 cigar day for me, since we hung out for like 8 or 9 hours.

First off I had a Nub Habano. This cigar was a revelation. The instant I sparked it up it was delicious and exciting. It tasted like grilled steak with hot sauce. So spicy and meaty, and like all Nubs I've tried it had a durable ash and an admirable construction, which made for a good time. I hung out with it for quite a while. A couple hours later I got to try the Ave Maria La Reconquista from my AJ Fernandez box-press perfecto sampler. This was a Brazilian habano oscuro wrapper, and smoked beautifully. The draw was just right, and the spice on this was almost overwhelming at first. It was like black pepper and cayenne when it had just been lit, but there a subtle sweetness underneath that made it all work. An extremely nicotine-rich cigar though -- worth making sure you've had a meal for. We finished with a Flor de Las Antillas, which also didn't skimp on spice. After having had several days of unsatisfying smokes it was nice to take this one down to the very nub.

This was a lot of extremely spicy cigars. I'm gonna have something creamy and mellow for my next smoke I think. Really nice to have several good ones in a row though.

Kenning
Jan 10, 2009

I really want to post goatse. I wish I had 10bux




I definitely know the feeling about posting. The best excuse to post is to talk about whatever cigar you've just smoked, lol. Also, in terms of keeping track of what you like, I have a spreadsheet. I record the brand, the specific cigar, the shape, the band, the length, the origin, the wrapper, binder, and filler. Then I give a 1-10 rating, and add notes on the experience. It seems a little ridiculous, but it has seriously helped me keep track of the things I've really enjoyed. I have a second sheet on the spreadsheet where I keep track of what's in my humidor, tracking ins and outs so that I know what I've got and whether or not I want to think about re-ordering anything.

That said, I don't have much in the way of organization inside my humidor atm. Especially after the cigar swap my buddies and I did it's a loving mess in there. I think my next move will be to find some modular shelves/stackable trays to put in there to keep things better organized.

One thing I've found over the course of tracking all this is that man, I've never been truly impressed by a Gurkha. I liked their Aged Cabinet Connecticuts, but only when I got them $65 for a 20 pack, rather than at full price. Everything else has been pretty so-so. They mostly taste good when they're smoking right, but it can be such a struggle to get them to smoke right. It's such a contrast to something like My Father, where everything I've tried has been consistently excellent and beautifully constructed.

NewFatMike posted:

Cuban info

This is excellent info, and will be going into the OP. Also now I'm thinking I should get a PerfecDraw. So many accessories!

Kenning fucked around with this message at 17:11 on Jul 13, 2020

Kenning
Jan 10, 2009

I really want to post goatse. I wish I had 10bux




C/p from the other thread that I posted in without noticing cause it got bumped:

I smoked a Perdomo Reserve 10th Anniversary Champagne toro tonight. It was definitely a very relaxing smoke compared to the spice-bombs I had this weekend. Burned nice, well constructed. Creamy taste, with a bit of an almond/marzipan thing going on. I think I might try a smaller size, especially if I can get it for a discount, as a nice cigar to share with people who aren't big smokers, since it was quite pleasant and very mellow. It lasted over an hour, and I think I might have preferred it as like a 30-45 minute smoke, since there wasn't much development.

Kenning
Jan 10, 2009

I really want to post goatse. I wish I had 10bux




Ah, too bad about the packaging. When I got 3 boxes of My Father cigars from them a month or so ago they came in very good condition. I smoked one that night that was fabulous. Hope yours do okay.

Tonight I smoked a Hoyo la Amistad Gold from my AJ Fernandez box press perfecto sampler and hot drat that was an incredible cigar. This one had a fairly loose pull, so I was smoking too hard to start it off. Once I realized that and slowed down a bit it developed this incredible toffee-and-chocolate flavor, with a rich cedar aroma to the smoke. When I pulled there was this amazingly sweet taste to the smoke right on the tip of my tongue, and in the back third there was a sort of toasted coconut/walnut character that came out. It was so good I smoked it down to about a half inch, and only gave up because the ash was getting precarious. I will absolutely be getting more of this cigar. It was ultra-mellow, without any noticeable pepper once I figured out to slow down the smoke a bit, and it stayed lit nicely. Might qualify as another cigar to share with new smokers in the Rothschild size.

Kenning
Jan 10, 2009

I really want to post goatse. I wish I had 10bux




Had a Nub Connecticut today. I need to be a bit more aggressive in sparking up my Nubs, cause I've had a couple get a bit of the cone shape in the cherry from not getting fully lit in the middle. Still a great smoke though, overwhelming vanilla custard flavor. They're really doing something right down there. Followed up with the Rocky Patel 1990 maduro perfecto, which remains and excellent, reliable short smoke. The only downside with that one is that the pinched tip makes you sort of work to get it started up, which makes me hesitate to share it with people who aren't regulars. Great flavor though, with loads of smoke.

In terms of long smokes I spent 2.5 hours on a My Father Opulencia. 3.5 hours sounds unbelievable.

Kenning
Jan 10, 2009

I really want to post goatse. I wish I had 10bux




So, I'm aware of the smoking too hot thing, and I've been pretty good at slowing down and letting the cherry catch up on some other cigars. Sometimes though I feel like I'm smoking too hot and I let it cool off a bit and then it feels like I lose all the heat and have to really puff to get it going again, so we get back to smoking too hot. Is this a lighting issue (i.e. I'm not getting an even light to begin with), or should I let it go all the way out and clear off the ash and char and start fresh?

Kenning
Jan 10, 2009

I really want to post goatse. I wish I had 10bux




Mrenda posted:

Not necessarily for nicotine sickness, although it would work for it, but just as a general accompaniment to cigars, but especially a lot of pipe tobacco I find sugary tea with a bit of milk goes well. Irish/English breakfast tea, one or two teaspoons of sugar to taste, and a drop of milk.

If I'm going to light a pipe tobacco or cigar that I don't already know the flavour of, and so what to pair with it, tea works really well. When you drink it it doesn't add or mount up with the flavours of the tobacco, I feel it almost neutralises them so you get a fresh go at the taste next draw.

Quoting to say that this is an excellent choice. My go-to had been an Old Fashioned with cigars, but I've been having heartburn/not sleeping very well lately so I've not been drinking on weeknights to see if that helps. A simple English breakfast with milk and sugar was an excellent accompaniment with the Rocky 1990 perfecto tonight. Highly recommended for when you're keeping it low key.

Ophidian posted:

Dry your sticks out a little before you smoke them. I usually throw whatever in smoking/planning on smoking for the day in a dry cigar box in the AM and smoke it in the evening. Seems to help a little bit but I also keep my sticks a little drier anyway.

This is a great idea, and I will be putting it into practice tomorrow.

Kenning
Jan 10, 2009

I really want to post goatse. I wish I had 10bux




Kenning posted:

This is a great idea, and I will be putting it into practice tomorrow.

Lol, I did this and when I checked the humidity in my humidor was 67 and out of my humidor it was 77. Whoops.

Flor de las Antillas maduro torpedo tonight. The box press on that cigar makes it intensely elegant and comfortable to hold. Smokes like hell too, rich and spicy.

Kenning
Jan 10, 2009

I really want to post goatse. I wish I had 10bux




Yo, if you're into making cigar accessories and stuff I'd pay a very fair price for some custom cigar goon things, that sounds cool as hell.

Kenning
Jan 10, 2009

I really want to post goatse. I wish I had 10bux




It's definitely easier to buy boxes if you have people to split them with. I can justify having 7-10 of a given smoke more easily than 20-24. That said, I'll probably be keeping a box of Flor de last Antillas around, since it's a personal favorite and something I'm basically always in the mood for.

NewFatMike posted:

I have been doodling up a modernist inspired individual cigar holder and ashtray 3D printed with high temp resin. I just need work to give me some software access back

I've got a few things I'm noodling around with and believe me, once they're done I'll be posting all up in this thread about it.

Presentation tray is high on the list for simplicity, getting out to the dang place is the hard part!

Super looking forward to seeing the stuff you make. Speaking of cigar accessories, I picked up the PerfecDraw and it definitely helped smoke the Romeo by RyJ Churchill today. I really enjoyed the Romeo robusto, which is 5x54. The Churchill, at 7x56 I mostly bought cause it was the biggest cigar at Total Wine and I figured it was a safer bet since I knew I'd enjoyed the robusto. To be honest, I don't think it's an interesting enough cigar to be that big. Once I opened it up with the PerfecDraw it lit up just fine, and pretty tasty for the first hour or so, but by the last 3rd the flavor felt like it was flagging and I felt like I was over it.

So far I've not been convinced by any of the really large cigars I've tried. I'd love to find a Churchill that's worth the time investment, but I think I'm starting to skew a bit more towards smaller vitolas.

Oh right, I also got some shelves for my humidor:





Much more organized!

Kenning
Jan 10, 2009

I really want to post goatse. I wish I had 10bux




Last night I tried to smoke an Oliva Serie O torpedo and it was unforgivably tightly-rolled. I could barely pull any air through it, and even after using the PerfecDraw multiple times it was only okay. I ended up abandoning it because I couldn't get enough air through it to keep combustion going. It sucks, cause it tasted really good and I was looking forward to enjoying it. I had a similar experience with some Serie V toros I got a few months ago. The leaves at the cap were so dense that as soon as they picked up any moisture from my mouth/the smoke they just laminated together. Super disappointing, since I'd hoped the Serie V I'd gotten were a fluke. Oh well.

Kenning
Jan 10, 2009

I really want to post goatse. I wish I had 10bux




Yeah, again, I live on the coast and my ambient humidity has been 70%-80% for the last couple months. Might have to just use some dry silica packets and a small tupperware to try and dry stuff out during the day, which is very silly problem to have.

Kenning
Jan 10, 2009

I really want to post goatse. I wish I had 10bux




Had my first really nice cigar in like a week today. The Diesel Unlimited from the AJ Fernandez box press perfecto sampler was quite good. Fairly similar to the Hoyo la Amistad, but a bit darker. Had a nice progression through the thirds, starting off like Vietnamese coffee with creamy espresso and sweetness, progressing on to tiramisu (which is pretty similar, but a bit more intense), and finishing with sandalwood and just a touch of cinnamon raisin bread. Absolutely looking forward to this one again.

Kenning
Jan 10, 2009

I really want to post goatse. I wish I had 10bux




I'll just say, I loved the Nub Habano. It was exactly what I wanted from a spicy cigar with a pleasant bite. If you end up being able to grab one for a deal I'd say it would be worth another shot at some point.

Kenning
Jan 10, 2009

I really want to post goatse. I wish I had 10bux




I gotta get some more Padrons. That was one of our go-to cigars before COVID, and I've wanted to try it again now that I've sampled a lot more things.

Enjoyed a My Father Opulencia with the boys on video chat tonight. Very perfumey, in the way that really good coffee or dark chocolate can taste perfumey. It's sort of a dessert cigar, for sure, but really well constructed, and smokes beautifully for at least 2 hours. I used the PerfecDraw as a nubber for the first time tonight, felt pretty good to smoke it down to about a half inch.

Kenning
Jan 10, 2009

I really want to post goatse. I wish I had 10bux




Honestly cigars are one of the few things helping me through COVID. Although my issue is more that sometimes it's like 55 degrees on my deck in the evenings and I freeze my rear end off trying to enjoy my smoke. I ordered a tank-top propane heater and was looking forward to smoking in more comfort, but the stupid valve is leaky so I'll probably have to send it back. Oh well.

Smoked an AJ Fernandez New World Puro Especial robusto last night. It was a little dense when I first punched it, but with the PerfecDraw I was able to open it up enough to really enjoy, and the density of the roll made for a very consistent burn through. Thanks for the recommendation on that one NewFatMike, it's become an indispensable tool. The cigar was spicy to start, then sort of meaty/leathery, with just a bit of sweetness as it finished off. Quite pleasant, and a nice long smoke for a smaller cigar. So far I've really enjoyed all the AJ Fernandez stuff I've tried.

Kenning
Jan 10, 2009

I really want to post goatse. I wish I had 10bux




Sounds like a great time! I need to try some Arturo Fuente stuff. I think my next round of purchases will be mostly shoring up on things I know I really enjoy, but AF cigars are near the top of new things to try.

Tried a Joyo de Nicaragua Antaño Dark Corojo robusto today. It was okay. The flavor was nice, though not too exciting. Sort of a Cocoa Puffs cereal thing going on, no spice to speak of. I may just have developed a taste for looser draws, or maybe it's a result of my climate, but it eventually felt like a chore to keep puffing. I switched to a Flor de las Antillas maduro torpedo and really enjoyed it. The box press on that cigar is very dramatic, it's thin and an elegant-feeling. I had to loosen it up a bit after the torpedo end got a bit wet, but it smoked beautifully after that. I really love the construction on My Father cigars, they smoke so nicely.

Kenning
Jan 10, 2009

I really want to post goatse. I wish I had 10bux




Looking forward to grabbing a few new My Father cigars to try. I really wanna try the Centurion H-2K-CT and the Antiguedad, and maybe the Judge.

I smoked a Nub Cameroon 460 the other day. Had a nice leather and wood chewiness that was pretty fun. I also had a Flor de las Antillas maduro, which again is basically fruitcake with the raisin and plum and a touch of spice.

A buddy of mine gave me a few Macanudo Cafe ascots (4.2 x 32). Not super complex, but surprisingly tasty and fun to smoke. Might keep a few around here or there for friends or to have with coffee.

Kenning
Jan 10, 2009

I really want to post goatse. I wish I had 10bux




Had a Nub Habano 560 tonight. Was much mellower and sweeter than the 460 I had a few weeks ago. I dunno if that's because that one was drier (since my buddy had just brought it over), or if it's a difference in vitola. Still a very nice smoke, hung out for quite a while and I really enjoyed it.

Got a big order from Cigar Bid coming on Monday. Gonna get some CAO Flathead Carbs, some Perdomo Champagne Puritos, and a few of our favorite Nubs. Very excited about it.

Kenning
Jan 10, 2009

I really want to post goatse. I wish I had 10bux




Had a Rocky Patel The Edge maduro torpedo last night. It was fine. Really well constructed and smoked great, but the flavor seemed pretty mild and indistinct. Had a few moments of sort of marshmallow sweetness, but otherwise mostly meh. Oh well.

Kenning
Jan 10, 2009

I really want to post goatse. I wish I had 10bux




NewFatMike posted:

Hell yeah poor decisions crew!

I'm having another EP Carrillo New Wave Connecticut Stella. Giving them an off day has helped, and I'm looking forward to seeing if they last long enough to really improve.

Even if they don't, this is really yummy. I haven't had many Connecticut wrapped smokes prior to this summer, but I think I'm getting what the flavor is based on how this overlaps with the H-2K-CT Centurions.

They're mild-medium, very smooth. There's a perfume flavor and occasionally this super rich chocolate that lasts for a puff or two before it disappears. Cream builds through the smoke, so the complexity of pricier smokes is there.

It likes slow draws, especially if you're going back-to-back on puffs like I have been the last few days.

I'm really pleased. A box of 20 is right at $80, which is pretty bananas for a full size long filler (5-1/8" x 44 IIRC). A lot of stuff in this price range comes in 50 cabs to hit $4/stick, which can still be tough to swallow.

Man, those sound really good, gonna put those on the list to try out next time I make an order.

Smoked a Nub Maduro last night. Easily the least satisfying of the Nubs I've tried. Pretty indistinct flavors, about midway through there was lots of espresso, but not all that much of interest to keep me excited. Felt pretty heavy also, definitely heavier than I think the flavor justified. Of the Nubs I've tried so far, I think it goes Habano > Connecticut > Cain = Cameroon > Maduro. I still need to try the double maduro, my friend said he enjoyed that one better than the regular maduro. I've got both Habano and Connecticut Nubs coming on Monday, which I'm excited about.

Kenning
Jan 10, 2009

I really want to post goatse. I wish I had 10bux




Holy poo poo that's an incredible ash. Very impressive. I'll have to try the Perdomo Champagne Noir, since I liked the regular Champagne well enough and it was certainly nicely constructed.

Had a regular old Flor de las Antillas tonight and man, there's a reason that's my favorite smoke. Tonight I got a lot more of the hay and barnyard flavors and it was really nice. Still plenty spicy, especially up front, but there was also plenty of cream and the aforementioned fresh hay. A really impeccable cigar, I smoked it down to a nub about as small as Lyon's, although without the stunning ash.

I can't wait to get a box of the H-2K-CTs. They sound really good.

Kenning
Jan 10, 2009

I really want to post goatse. I wish I had 10bux




Lyon posted:

I just got in a stupid number of cigars but then I saw a lot of DPG lines that were close to closing on CigarAuctioneer without any bids so I continue to be an idiot.
  • El Centurion Toro Grande 5 pack (original)
  • Cabaiguan Petite Cabaiguan 5 pack
  • La Aroma De Cuba Edicion Especial Robusto 5 pack
  • San Cristobal Revelation Mystic 5 pack

I also grabbed a RoMa Craft Intemperance EC XVIII petite corona 5 pack and a Best of Miami sampler with a bunch of La Aurora. Everything was $5 or less a cigar except the El Centurion which was $5.50/per so I’ve convinced myself it was worth it. I didn’t have space for my last order so this won’t help. Looks like I'm gonna be ordering some more Tupperware. I seriously need an adult to supervise me.

Lol I just did the same thing today. I'm still waiting on my last order (coming Monday) but today I sniped a couple things at excellent prices. I blame NewFatMike.

NewFatMike posted:

I'm having another EP Carrillo New Wave Connecticut Stella. Giving them an off day has helped, and I'm looking forward to seeing if they last long enough to really improve.

I got a 20 box of these for $55.50, which I feel pretty pleased with. I also got 10 Montecristo White 5 x 52, and 5 Ave Maria La Reconquista for like $3.50/per, which is a ridiculous price given the MSRP. No coffin boxes but who cares.

I'm pretty sure that all of these will fit in my humidor, but I guess we're going to have to see.

Smoked my second San Lotano Oval from the AJ Fernandez box press perfecto sampler. More meaty and peppery to start with than I remember the last one being, but it transitioned nicely into a slight sweetness with some warm spices, like I remember. Honestly I really enjoyed everything from that sampler, and CigarBid has had it lately on FreeFall, I think you can get it for like $65.

Kenning
Jan 10, 2009

I really want to post goatse. I wish I had 10bux




Smoked my second Man o' War Ruination 10th Anniversary box press perfecto yesterday. Opened up like a rich dark chocolate, like a bar of 88 percent cocoa, and then after a while mellowed out into chocolate-covered biscuit territory. A bit of pepper on the spark up, but then it trended sweet, although it's quite a full-bodied cigar. Followed it up a bit later with a Nub Cain 460. It's a good smoke, very meaty and chewy. Also, I'm pretty pleased with the ash I ended up with on this one. I ended up calling it shortly after this photo cause it was late and I suspected it would get hot and a bit less delicious once I finally lost the ash.



Syrian Lannister posted:

I primarily smoke pipes and aromatics from the fall through the spring, and occassionally dip into cigars in the summer.

Right now I'm still trying to figure out cigarwise what I like.

(Drugstore Dutch Masters ruined cigars for me for a good thirty plus years)

Please, post about pipe stuff here! Plus, if you share the type of pipe tobacco you smoke/the flavors etc. we might be able to make some cigar suggestions.

Lyon posted:

Still trying to workout my organization system, how do you guys curate your cigars? I think I’m going to keep it mostly the same but do two boxes for cigars I’ve tried before/are aging, one box for cigars I haven’t tried yet, one box for low to medium regulars, and one box for the nicer stuff maybe.

I also ordered cedar trays off amazon to put in the boxes that don’t have them, should I just dunk them in distilled water for a minute and let them dry?

I follow the advice from somewhere deep in the last thread that the easiest way to age your cigars is to buy enough of them that a few just get lost in your humidor and you accidentally age them that way. In part I follow this advice because it's funny, and in part because I live in quite a small apartment and my girlfriend (who is quite accommodating about cigars in general!) has made it clear that it is a 1 humidor apartment.

As for the shelves, I didn't bother seasoning mine because the fact that they dropped the humidity in my humidor for a week or two was pretty desirable, although my buddies just did the wipe with distilled water and let it soak in thing which seemed to work fine.

Kenning
Jan 10, 2009

I really want to post goatse. I wish I had 10bux




Lyon posted:

I have a bunch of Man O’ War stuff in my tupperdors waiting to get the call up so I’m glad you’re enjoying the line. What’s your favorite from that AJF sampler so far?

All the cigars were quite good in that sampler, and it's definitely worth checking out, since I think you can still get it on Cigar Bid for under $70. My favorite was probably the Diesel Unlimited or the Hoyo la Amistad Gold. They're both thick with syrupy notes I enjoy, with the Diesel being a bit more tiramisu and the Hoyo la Amistad being more toffee and cream. The San Lotano Oval was peppery, meaty, and warm spices (cinnamon etc.), the Man o' War, like I said, is very dark chocolate, and the Ave Maria Reconquista was an absolute pepper bomb – quite enjoyable, but more of a sometimes cigar.

Kenning
Jan 10, 2009

I really want to post goatse. I wish I had 10bux




I smoked the first one just a week or two after getting them. I have another one that's been in the humidor for a month or so, and I've got a 5-pack of the normal torpedoes coming soon, so those will probably get some time to relax in the box.

ThatOneGuy posted:

Did she say what size humidor? If not, get a really large cooler. gently caress messing with cheap wood poo poo.

I've got a 19.5 qt. weatherproof plastic bin I'm using for a humidor. It holds a lot of cigars, so I'm not complaining too much.

Lyon posted:

I just saw it on free fall but unfortunately it’s a CigarAuctioneer week. I’ll have to look for it the next time it goes back up.

Speaking of CigarAuctioneer:

Edit: Figured I would kick off sharing some okay-ish deals to try and get you guys sharing your finds. Share your Cigars International, Cigar Bid, Famous Smoke, Cigar Auctioneer, etc. deals.

This is a great idea, and might be a good outlet for me to keep browsing the various sites without buying, since I'll need to slow up after this current set of Cigar Bid lots closes out, just because I won't have space (plus that'll be enough cigars for a few months at least).

Kenning
Jan 10, 2009

I really want to post goatse. I wish I had 10bux




Got my bid Cigar Bid order in. I'm seeing my buddies on Saturday, which is good because my humidor is packed to the gills. The answer for "How many cigars can a 9.5 qt tub with 3 shelves in it hold" turns out to be "somewhat less than 180." Tonight I decided to throw caution to the wind and smoke a CAO Flathead 660 right off the truck. Luckily cigars tend to not be too dried out when I get them delivered, and this one seemed to be in quite good condition, so I went for it.

First off, that's a beefy smoke. Thick, heavy, and strong on nicotine. Definitely want to have a meal beforehand, and you should probably have some sort of snack/drink while you're going. It was hard to pull out individual flavors, but not because it was muddy. It felt like a well-integrated dark and rich cigar. Draw was excellent, a touch on the light side, which I think is appropriate for the size. There was some pepper right on spark up, then a bit of cola. The middle part of the cigar was mostly subtle, rich chocolate, and then right into the final 3rd there was a nice almost anise tingle, reminiscent of but sharper than the initial cola. The strength of the cigar built towards the end also.

Looking forward to see if it mellows out a bit in the humidor after a month or two, but even if not I can see craving something like this when you want a cigar to really settle you down and force you to take it slow.

Kenning
Jan 10, 2009

I really want to post goatse. I wish I had 10bux




Lyon posted:

How's everyone holding up with quarantine/social distancing/whatever? I got into cigars because of the quarantine and feeling sort of trapped at home. I'm definitely still using it for my moment of zen and I guess now I'm hooked.

Yeah, me and my buddies would usually meet up once a week to smoke cigars. Now we're usually once per day on video chat. It's a good excuse to hang out and catch up. I'd been wanting to properly learn cigars for a while, and COVID finally provided the impetus.

I smoked one of Diesel d.5 robustos last night. It was a good, solid smoke, rich and flavorful, but maybe a bit less distinctive than the BP perfecto from the sampler. Still I quite enjoyed it and am looking forward to having more (which is convenient, because I have a lot of them now). Today I tried out one of the Perdomo Champagne puritos (4 x 38) and it was everything I hoped it would be. Mellow and creamy, excellent draw and smoke production. This is an excellent small cigar. It'll be hard for me to avoid picking up more in the future. Highly recommended if you're looking for an easy half hour smoke.

Syrian Lannister posted:

Sorry, works been nuts as of late.

Borkum Rift Original
Captain Black Original
C&D Autumn Evening, Black Cherry
Hearth and Home Cherry
Mac Baren: Vanilla , 7 Seas
Sutliff Molto Dolce, Christmas Spice

GL Pease Mephisto was the only odd-ball.

Can you provide notes on flavors and intensity? I assume the one with Vanilla in the name is creamy and a bit sweet, you should try a Nub Connecticut if so.

Kenning
Jan 10, 2009

I really want to post goatse. I wish I had 10bux




D-d-d-double post!

Okay, so I'm going to do the thing Lyon suggested and post some deals here.

Cigar Bid

Some Free Fall items you can get for an excellent price

My Father La Promesa Petite. Short robusto, 4.5 x 50, 20 box. The urge to buy this one is extremely powerful. I think the price bottoms out around $110.

Perdomo Champage Puritos. Petite corona, 4 x 38, 5 five-pack tins. This one bottoms out somewhere around $65 I think.

AJ Fernandex Box Press Perfecto Sampler II. Gordo perfectos, 6 x 60, 4 each of 5 different cigars. I loved this whole sampler. Bottoms out around $70 I think.


Cigars International

Today's Joe Cigar deal is a 10 pack of Nub Habano 460s for $39.99, free shipping. Pretty solid price for Nubs, tbh.

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Kenning
Jan 10, 2009

I really want to post goatse. I wish I had 10bux




NewFatMike posted:

Picked up a mess of Curivari cigars from Fox Cigar. Really thrilled to order from them again. Had a few big purchases on this one paycheck, so it's definitely cheap and cheerful for at least a month.

My partner is proposing tomorrow (had to change of plans from the original surprise weekend so planning it out kinda needed my knowledge), so I've laid out my fully decadent arrangement:

Arturo Fuente Añejo Shark
La Aurora Hors D'Age 2018 Corona Extra
My Father La Gran Oferta lancero
Hamlet Tabaquero Salamon

Tomorrow is very special and my final splurge will be on my favorite whiskey: Nikka Coffey Grain.

I hope everybody has a special weekend and great smokes!

Congrats, and also congrats! Looks like a great day of smokes, and I hope it's a great time in general.

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