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Eclipse12
Feb 20, 2008



My wife and I own a modular home from the 1970s. Recently I was removing our old deck when I noticed that the siding was damaged where the old deck met the home. I pulled the damaged siding off and BIG rear end HOLE IN THE HOUSE.

I stripped away some more siding and pulled out some of the rotted wood. Here's the full view


Here's a closer look. I wedged the 2x4 ineffectively under that joist to stop it from dropping down. It obviously isn't in there very well, but the wood below it was so rotted away beforehand I don't think it changes anything.


Here's a look from the side. The black abyss is a crawlspace under the kitchen. I've got a few feet of clearance under there to work with.


Right under the damaged spot the laminate flooring of the kitchen is showing. The kitchen floor itself feels a tad soft in that area, not surprisingly, but it supports weight fine.


To the left of the hole. The wood is in a lot better shape here, so I don't think the damage is too widespread


To the right of the hole


Measurements



Also, I noticed there was no separate plastic weatherproofing under the siding.

I am a novice handyman who can usually figure my way through projects. I've installed a kitchen sink + counters, bathroom vanity, trim, done basic plumbing, painting, that kinda stuff.

One of my first questions is about the construction. Here it look like a 2x6 on top of two smaller boards when most of the pictures/videos I've seen seem to just show two boards. 1 base on the concrete block and one board on top. What's up with the three? Wouldn't it be easier to replace it with just two? Or are the sizes odd and not allowing that with standard-sized materials.

My current repair process is intending to be:
Cut out the rotted areas
Lift/support the joists from inside the crawlspace using jackstands
Mount 2x4s next to the damaged joists to help reduce their stress
Use construction adhesive to attach boards to the concrete blocks
Wedge 2x6s or 2x8s on top of those lower boards. What do you attach those to? Just use adhesive and the weight on top? Is there a really specific way to make sure they're set in the right spot?
Release jackstands
Plywood layer on the outside of the new material
Weatherstripping
Replace siding

Am I missing any major steps? I'm doing this solo because I don't really have any handy friends or relatives in the area.

Thanks!

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Dr. Kyle Farnsworth
Apr 23, 2004

"He's a great baker. He's Betty Crocker. He makes the best peanut butter cookies ever."

How'd you get in your wall anyway?

While you can get under there, I'd see if you can tell how far the damage has spread and what else is wrong underneath there. Naturally this may turn it into a much bigger project, but that's the way of home ownership.

tehllama
Apr 29, 2009

Hook, swing.

I'm pretty sure Kastein did this to a lot of his house in his project thread (rotted sill plates, rim joist, maybe some of the floor joists, I think had to replace part of the studs?), and has pictures of how he did it. Pretty sure it was a lot more extensive than what you have in front of you but might be helpful to see how someone else did it.

Eclipse12
Feb 20, 2008



tehllama posted:

I'm pretty sure Kastein did this to a lot of his house in his project thread (rotted sill plates, rim joist, maybe some of the floor joists, I think had to replace part of the studs?), and has pictures of how he did it. Pretty sure it was a lot more extensive than what you have in front of you but might be helpful to see how someone else did it.

Cool, thanks, I'll check it out.

Went into the crawlspace today and used a jack to support a joist that has attached at the end anymore. It appears someone already fixed it a long time ago and did a piss-poor job. Luckily, there's a clear distinction of where there work ends and the intact wood begins.

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