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Beet Wagon
Oct 19, 2015







Jonny 290 posted:

yes, moras are shitloads more useful and durable

I have them all over the house and in my camp gear and poo poo, but this one is my recent favorite



Not the best for cutting up veggies or whatever, but can't be beat for utility knife work. Way better at opening boxes with that 90 corner edge than a regular knife.

Moras absolutely rule and I feel like a loving dummy every time I think about how much money I wasted on Kershaws and CRKT folders and God knows what else.

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PathAsc
Nov 15, 2011

Hail SS-18 Satan may he cleanse us with nuclear fire

PISS TAPE IS REAL



Pennywise the Frown posted:

Also, this is the pack I have. The USMC ILBE rucksack. I was hypomanic for a period of time maybe 5 years ago and bought all sorts of things for this.

I think it's a bit overkill. Like... by a lot. To the point of being not practical at all.



Honestly, it's more practical than you think. It distributes weight really well and you can carry some bulkier stuff. It may be a bit big for "grab'n'go" traditionally, but it's still extremely useful and the only issue I would see is if you got it in marpat and wanted to be more discreet.

Kylaer
Aug 3, 2007


So I'm putting together a bag for myself, honestly more as a talisman than because I think it'd actually help me. Where I live, if the situation becomes so bad that I have to try to evacuate on foot, the situation is almost certainly bad enough that I will not survive the process. But whatever, the cost of prepping is small compared to my income, so even if it just makes me feel a little better then it's worth it.

I started out by making several of these kits and giving them away to friends and family members, as a feel-good for myself and for them:



Contents:
4 500ml water bottles
~2 pounds of assorted food bars
3-liter Nalgene bottle which almost all of the non-food items fit into
Mora knife
Wowtac A7 flashlight with USB cable for recharging
Lifestraw water filter
State map
Utensil with can opener taped to it
Ferro rod, waterproof container with 25 storm matches, 4 tinder cubes
4 zip ties, 3 wire ties, and 3 carabiners
Tiny medical kit with antiseptic ointment, bandaids, alcohol swabs, superglue, and a couple of 4x4 gauze pads
Whistle
Mylar space blanket

Not shown in the picture because they hadn't arrived yet at the time I took it:
Wire saw
3 contractor-grade trash bags wrapped around the water bottle and secured with duct tape

Building these was a learning process. The small items all go into the water bottle, the water bottle, map, wire saw, and some of the food go into the shoulder bag, and everything goes into the mesh bag, which you can throw in the trunk of your car or whatever so it's close at hand. Originally I planned on just having the mesh bag but carrying anything heavy in a mesh bag for any length of time suuuucks, and the shoulder bag distributes the weight better. You can wear the shoulder bag and the mesh bag simultaneously and with the mesh bag mostly unloaded, it's a lot less uncomfortable. Honestly I should have just bought a bunch of small backpacks from Costco rather than bothering with the mesh bag to start with, and the shoulderbag turned out to be way smaller than I thought it would be.

I'll post more about my own kit shortly, that is still definitely a work in progress, and it's hampered by the fact that I've never enjoyed camping so I don't really know what stuff is good to have.

Elmnt80
Dec 30, 2012

OH NOOOO!





Pennywise the Frown posted:

I'd much rather have a bug out bag thread here in an outdoors forum. If you google anything about bug out bags or prepping it's going to be filled with chuds and half of the talk is about their guns/weapons/protecting against and fighting humans.

I just made a bug out bag a few months ago but I'm definitely not going to unpack that thing. It's a 70L USMC molle pack not completely full. I have a list somewhere of what I put in there. Probably not the best stuff but I just used what I had on hand and didn't buy anything extra I don't think.

I do car things, I can 100% sympathize with having to wade through chud poo poo to find the information you want. I'm cool with this thread being here, it fits and has a bunch of crossover with outdoors gear. It just wasn't a thread I was expecting to see pop up, but thats ok too!

Also, I just remembered my title has a reference to bug out bags in it.

Rutibex
Sep 9, 2001

Official Forums Path of Exile Expert


Knowledge doesn't weigh anything, but it can easily take pounds off your back. The most important thing you can put into you bugout bag is a sound mind and study! For example many people will carry a heavy tent because the guide poles make it easy to set up without any skill. But if you practice a bit with knots you can make many more useful shelters with a simple tarp:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kEZ9Yuw0CjA

Food and water is also quite heavy, if you understand how to find and treat water you dont need to carry as much. Also depending on the season there are a variety of wild planet you can eat. You shouldn't go foraging, but if you know what to look for you can supplement your calories with wild edibles that you spot along your hike. Every pound of food you find is a pound you dont need to carry:

https://northernbushcraft.com/
https://matteroftrust.org/62-edible-wild-plants-that-you-didnt-know-you-can-eat/
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edible_plants
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WIRemyGT_xM

Thunder Moose
Mar 7, 2015

S.J.C.

Left to right, sort of:

~Up top:
*Duffle bag I got at a thrift store - contains the below items (minus the camel pack)
*Camel pack (contains a few dried rations of rice/veggies in sealed bags, edit: also a life straw water bottle)

~Next rung:
*Reflective Vest
*Emergency Tent
*TP
*Wound kit
*Cliff Bars
*Rain pants/rain coat
*Latex gloves
*Off! bug spray
*Trauma pack

~Below, from the left again
*Sleeping bag
*Emergency blanket (essentially a tarp)
*Emergency radio
*Matches
*Advil
*Emergency radio power cable
*Gauze tape
*More Off!
*Toiletries (toothbrush/paste/deodorant)
*Scarf
*Hoodie wrapped with bandannas
*Zippo fluid
*Hatchet

NOT PICTURED:
Leatherman "wingman" - MIA in the home somewhere, I blame the cat
G19 - I am uneasy about posting photos of guns I own
Zippo itself - somewhere in the house and I am lazy

Only registered members can see post attachments!

Thunder Moose fucked around with this message at 17:46 on Jul 19, 2020

AmbassadorofSodomy
Dec 30, 2016

SUCK A MALE CAMEL'S DICK WITH MIRACLE WHIP!!


Hey!! I have that same radio, but mine is black not yellow.

How do you like it?

Thunder Moose
Mar 7, 2015

S.J.C.

wesleywillis posted:

Hey!! I have that same radio, but mine is black not yellow.

How do you like it?

I've only used it a bit - I like it a lot though! I got yellow as my theme for my bag is "hard to lose poo poo in the middle of ________ if it's bright."

Jonny 290
May 5, 2005

[ASK] me about OS/2 WARP




Thunder Moose posted:

I've only used it a bit - I like it a lot though! I got yellow as my theme for my bag is "hard to lose poo poo in the middle of ________ if it's bright."

Visually noisy gear is great. I spent 30 minutes trying to find the green sheath for my Mora once...in my side yard.

Thunder Moose
Mar 7, 2015

S.J.C.

Jonny 290 posted:

Visually noisy gear is great. I spent 30 minutes trying to find the green sheath for my Mora once...in my side yard.

Yep - and considering I am a bit of an idiot with serious ADD, it doesn't help matters...

Jonny 290
May 5, 2005

[ASK] me about OS/2 WARP




On that note, kinda:

If you have a large bag, you. need. dry. sacks.



They're cheap. they're color-coded. they keep your socks or Bic lighters dry on a rainy night or if you slip in a creek. They can be used to transport water in a scary scenario. They keep your main compartment from being a chaos zone that settles all the dense things in the bottom and pushes your hoodie to the top. Big fan.

Rutibex
Sep 9, 2001

Official Forums Path of Exile Expert


Jonny 290 posted:

On that note, kinda:

If you have a large bag, you. need. dry. sacks.



They're cheap. they're color-coded. they keep your socks or Bic lighters dry on a rainy night or if you slip in a creek. They can be used to transport water in a scary scenario. They keep your main compartment from being a chaos zone that settles all the dense things in the bottom and pushes your hoodie to the top. Big fan.

dry sacs are essential! especially in bear country. you can put all your food in the sac and sling it into a tree away from the rest of your supplies at night. the fact that its air tight means smells don't escape as easily.

gariig
Dec 31, 2004
Beaten into submission by my fiance

Pillbug

I thought this guy had a good overview of a "bugout" bag that was fairly practical. The blog leans "Instagram influencer" for 40-60 year old men so some of the items are $$$$ but you can pick something cheaper. Once the 'Rona is over and people are back in the office this seems to be the most reasonable thing. Most likely a small emergency shuts everything around you down (tornado, flooding, major accident) and you need to get home or shelter in-place

I think having something for home to leave in case of fire/flooding/tornado/earthquake is also important. I don't get the "society implodes and I'll survive" prepping. Most likely society will never implode, and if it does I hope it takes me with it

I also have a small emergency kit in the car, mostly in case I'm stuck on the side of the road not near anything. Once again, enough to shelter in-place or backpacks to move a small amount away from the car in case it's unsafe

Jonny 290
May 5, 2005

[ASK] me about OS/2 WARP




as far as how you should 'tier' things, I have a sort of system. I have a 'one day' that allows me to get home if i'm out (LOL at this in 2020 though) and has some basic tools. In each vehicle I have a '3 day' bag with enough luxuries to sleep, eat, poo poo and call for help. Then in the house I have a 7 day setup (army duffel owns) and an accompanying Cat Bugout Setup.

See, I love my cat more than anything and she is coming with me if I need to leave home. So i have a setup with a carrier inside a (new, never used) litter box, with a bottle of litter, a bag of food, some cans of wet food, bottles of water, two dishes and a couple toys. It's all strapped together and I can grab one handle, chuck her in the carrier and we go. Don't forget pet bugout!

Thunder Moose
Mar 7, 2015

S.J.C.

Jonny 290 posted:

as far as how you should 'tier' things, I have a sort of system. I have a 'one day' that allows me to get home if i'm out (LOL at this in 2020 though) and has some basic tools. In each vehicle I have a '3 day' bag with enough luxuries to sleep, eat, poo poo and call for help. Then in the house I have a 7 day setup (army duffel owns) and an accompanying Cat Bugout Setup.

See, I love my cat more than anything and she is coming with me if I need to leave home. So i have a setup with a carrier inside a (new, never used) litter box, with a bottle of litter, a bag of food, some cans of wet food, bottles of water, two dishes and a couple toys. It's all strapped together and I can grab one handle, chuck her in the carrier and we go. Don't forget pet bugout!

I've been thinking on cat bugouts for a few months now, great list

You may want to add a cat-leash though, and a spare set of nail clippers if you plan on possibly using a tent (freaked cat -> claws -> tent -> no more "tent")

Thunder Moose fucked around with this message at 19:32 on Jul 19, 2020

Jonny 290
May 5, 2005

[ASK] me about OS/2 WARP




ooh good thinking.

Man i wish those Cat Tents (the little display models) were cheaper. But i'm quickly derailing here.

Adding her spare harness/leash now to the pile, thank you.

Kylaer
Aug 3, 2007


So here is the pack I'm putting together for myself, I would greatly appreciate advice and feedback:



Pack itself is an Eberlestock HiSpeed II. It's medium-sized, not enormous like the ILBE, but it does have a hefty hip belt and an internal frame, which should make carrying things a lot easier. It's divided into 4 main compartments and I was thinking to have one compartment dedicated to food and water, one to clothing and shelter, one to tools, and one to things that need recharging or other maintenance.

3-liter water bladder, it's the recommended brand by Eberlestock so it should serve well.

Mora knife and Silky folding saw (this ended up being bigger than I expected, whoops).

Two bricks of lifeboat rations. Will also add a bunch of Clif bars but I didn't take a picture of those. I'm prioritizing food that requires absolutely no preparation which is why I've got this instead of Mountain House pouches or equivalent.

Ferro rod, container of storm matches, one dozen tinder cubes. Might be overdoing it with the fire-lighting materials since I don't have anything that requires cooking.

Two 30-foot lengths of paracord. Will seal these in a ziplock.

Vortex monocular - might take this out of the kit, seems of questionable value.

Utensil and can opener.

Sawyer water filter.

Nalgene bottle for storing small items.

Shelter - really in the dark here because I don't like camping and never have, so I'm picking items kind of blind. The big grey sack is this tarp kit which includes tent stakes and short lengths of paracord. Then there's a bivy sack, which seems to be a sleeping bag made out of mylar, and a regular mylar blanket. All these may in fact be garbage, I'm not sure how to evaluate them.

Cleaning wipes.

Three different lights - Wowtac A7 flashlight, Wowtac headlamp, Streamlight Siege mini-lantern. All of these use the same 18650 rechargable battery (I want to get some more of these batteries, anyone got a recommendation on the best quality ones?). USB recharging brick to top them all off. These are all going to get sealed in waterproof bags.

Things I need to add:
Compass
Medical kit - already got the supplies to make a basic one, as in my giveaway kits. May add trauma stuff or buy an off-the-shelf trauma first aid kit.
Dry bags, as were posted above
Insect repellent
Toothbrush and toothpaste
Clothing - one shirt, one pair of pants, two pairs of socks and two pairs of underwear, all extras of the same type I routinely wear. Probably will add a set of long underwear, a hat, and a pair of gloves when it gets cold.
Contractor trash bags - already have these, I'll wind them around the Nalgene just like in my giveaway kits.

Things I might add:
Multitool of some sort
Inflatable ground pad to sleep on - sleeping on the ground sounds very uncomfortable.
Some kind of small axe - probably not needed but, at heart, I want one.
Camp trowel
Crank-powered radio

Again, I'd welcome advice and feedback.

Thunder Moose
Mar 7, 2015

S.J.C.

Kylaer posted:

So here is the pack I'm putting together for myself, I would greatly appreciate advice and feedback:


Shelter - really in the dark here because I don't like camping and never have, so I'm picking items kind of blind. The big grey sack is this tarp kit which includes tent stakes and short lengths of paracord. Then there's a bivy sack, which seems to be a sleeping bag made out of mylar, and a regular mylar blanket. All these may in fact be garbage, I'm not sure how to evaluate them.

Again, I'd welcome advice and feedback.


You can get an emergency tent off Amazon for like, 20 bucks. Is it great? Lol no. Is it better than no tent at all? You bet. They also tend to be very, very portable.

https://www.amazon.com/emergency-tent/s?k=emergency+tent take your pick

Thunder Moose
Mar 7, 2015

S.J.C.

Jonny 290 posted:

ooh good thinking.

Man i wish those Cat Tents (the little display models) were cheaper. But i'm quickly derailing here.

Adding her spare harness/leash now to the pile, thank you.

In any scenario where I can stay with my car - it'll become the fat one's "home."

A scenario where I have to move away from everything - I guess I'll sleep with the leash tied to my leg and the fat one in his carrier, hating life and me lol.

Kylaer
Aug 3, 2007


Thunder Moose posted:

You can get an emergency tent off Amazon for like, 20 bucks. Is it great? Lol no. Is it better than no tent at all? You bet. They also tend to be very, very portable.

https://www.amazon.com/emergency-tent/s?k=emergency+tent take your pick

I think the tarp kit I bought will serve as well or better than any of those tents, unless it is itself absolute garbage, which is difficult for me to figure out. I'll have to go out and field test it, I guess, when I have some free time. My questions are more like, do I need a sleeping bag? If so, what's a decent one that won't take up all the space in my backpack? (Looking at them, volume seems to be the problem factor much more than weight). What about a ground pad? I'd like one, I think, but which one isn't garbage? Or should I buy a hammock instead and hope that I can find two trees appropriately far apart? I live in Virginia so if I'm outside of an urban area I can pretty well count on having trees, unlike being in Arizona or something. And, most importantly, are there things that I'm entirely overlooking? What are the unknown unknowns that I need to be enlightened about?

Rutibex
Sep 9, 2001

Official Forums Path of Exile Expert


Kylaer posted:

I think the tarp kit I bought will serve as well or better than any of those tents, unless it is itself absolute garbage, which is difficult for me to figure out. I'll have to go out and field test it, I guess, when I have some free time. My questions are more like, do I need a sleeping bag? If so, what's a decent one that won't take up all the space in my backpack? (Looking at them, volume seems to be the problem factor much more than weight). What about a ground pad? I'd like one, I think, but which one isn't garbage? Or should I buy a hammock instead and hope that I can find two trees appropriately far apart? I live in Virginia so if I'm outside of an urban area I can pretty well count on having trees, unlike being in Arizona or something. And, most importantly, are there things that I'm entirely overlooking? What are the unknown unknowns that I need to be enlightened about?

The tarp you picked up is actually very solid. You will want to learn rope tying and tarp configurations. You have a 10x10 so there are a few you can make that are entirely enclosed like a tent. You should get a set of trekking poles, they are great for hiking with a heavy pack but more importantly they double as tent poles when using a tarp:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7al80Xc8uLE

You absolutely want a sleeping bag and a ground pad. The ground pad is more important than you realize, you lose a lot of heat into the ground. Hammocks are nice, but more of a gimmick. You can't always find a place to set a hammock up, so you need a way to sleep on the ground anyway. As far the the sleeping bag this is the one I got, its light but its is super compact and compresses into a little sac:
https://www.amazon.com/Active-Era-Ultra-Lightweight-Sleeping/dp/B076PN92WP/

As for the ground pad, something like this is perfect. Don't get the inflatable ones, they can pop. Simple foam is light and durable. This on is coated in mylar as well:
https://www.amazon.com/REDCAMP-Sleeping-Camping-Lightweight-Backpacking/dp/B07MNR63QC/

Thunder Moose
Mar 7, 2015

S.J.C.

Rutibex posted:


You absolutely want a sleeping bag and a ground pad. The ground pad is more important than you realize, you lose a lot of heat into the ground.

I was taught that just getting a bunch of foliage off the ground: leaves, pine needles, etc - works well enough, and that what you really want is a pocket of air insulating you from the actual ground: but I can't say I've practiced what I've been taught so IDK.

Frances Nurples
May 10, 2008


It works alright as i recall, but not as good as a quarter inch of foam and a half inch of air. You need several times the area of your ground cover worth of leaves, pine needles, etc to make it work, which can be hard to find. The mat was one of the first thigns i used to ditch for weight though tbh, to the point I basically never used it after a while so I'd consider it a luxury if you can spare the weight. I know people who swore by 3/4 length non-inflatable foam pads though, but those add around half a pound and that adds up quick. If you can get a light one (lighter = more expensive, generally) it's a huge improvement over sleeping on uneven, cold ground and whatever you managed to pile under your tarp.

All that being said, if you're in it for the long haul or doing 4 seasons camping, you probably want a full length pad and a decent, climate appropriate 4 season bag with a liner. When it's hot, you keep the bag stowed and sleep in the liner, when it's cool you use the bag as additional padding to snuggle up in.

Sleeping outside isn't going to approach your comfy indoors bed unless you are basically car camping so keep that in mind and don't bust your butt trying to meet unreasonable expectations. The lightest workable solution is almost always your best bet.

Rutibex
Sep 9, 2001

Official Forums Path of Exile Expert


Thunder Moose posted:

I was taught that just getting a bunch of foliage off the ground: leaves, pine needles, etc - works well enough, and that what you really want is a pocket of air insulating you from the actual ground: but I can't say I've practiced what I've been taught so IDK.

that's a great plan until its been raining and all that poo poo is wet. but i donno, I'm not personally a survivalist. I'm mostly going off what i see long distance through-hikers carry. and almost all of them, even the ultra-lighters have sleeping pads.

Rutibex fucked around with this message at 10:24 on Jul 20, 2020

extra stout
Feb 24, 2005

ISILDUR's ERR


Kylaer posted:



Things I need to add:
Compass
Medical kit - already got the supplies to make a basic one, as in my giveaway kits. May add trauma stuff or buy an off-the-shelf trauma first aid kit.
Dry bags, as were posted above
Insect repellent
Toothbrush and toothpaste
Clothing - one shirt, one pair of pants, two pairs of socks and two pairs of underwear, all extras of the same type I routinely wear. Probably will add a set of long underwear, a hat, and a pair of gloves when it gets cold.
Contractor trash bags - already have these, I'll wind them around the Nalgene just like in my giveaway kits.

Things I might add:
Multitool of some sort
Inflatable ground pad to sleep on - sleeping on the ground sounds very uncomfortable.
Some kind of small axe - probably not needed but, at heart, I want one.
Camp trowel
Crank-powered radio

Again, I'd welcome advice and feedback.

Lots of stuff here but Mora makes the best $20~ knives in the world, and while they're more expensive those Silky saws are the talk of the town on all woodcarving sites so I think your own advice has been pretty drat good so far.

For a ground pad, inflatable is as light as you're going to get and this one is nice

https://klymit.com/products/static-v-camping-sleeping-pad?variant=31735711105114

The Klymit pads, and the pillows (which I don't think are worth money since you've got an arm and an elbow and some of your clothes or anything in your bag works as a pillow) often go on half off sales on https://www.camofire.com but it's a daily deal overstock kind of website so just check it one minute a day and eventually they'll be on there

Regarding bivy bags, I've got an old USMC one that I've only slept in once so I'm no expert, but I didn't feel uncomfortable when I woke up, if it's humid people do say you'll want a makeshift frame (curved stick even) or put your pack or some clothes near your head so the breathing slit actually lets air in/out

The axe is the hardest part to decide on since no axe can do every job, but they can do a lot. Typically at the expense of dollars and weight on your back though. The best hatchet for the money is a Husqvarna 13", but since they switched distributors the heads got a lot heavier. Carbon steel, so don't leave it wet but you could cut down a 1-2 foot wide tree with these, I have it's just a real work out. Cheaper or cooler options depending on your taste do exist, get an old Kelly hatchet or name your old American steel of choice and give it a vinegar or cola bath and resharpen, you can find these at estates often unless you're in a city.

Compass is easy: Suunto clippers are $20 and still made in Finland but very easy to lose. Suunto MC-2s are on ebay for maybe $40 lately, highly respected brand since at least WWII. Make sure it's for the right hemisphere obviously

edit

The hatchet that Thunder Moose posted is probably around 40 or 50 bucks too (I think it's an Estwing), and while hickory handles are heavy, I'd bet the steel handle still adds another few pounds. If you're not planning to hike far and don't know how to replace a wooden haft, that's another good option. I avoid Fiskars hatchets even though they make good products, purely because I don't ever want to go from having an axe to having a thousand splinters of plastic handle and hoping the edge doesn't bounce into my ankle

extra stout fucked around with this message at 16:39 on Jul 20, 2020

Thunder Moose
Mar 7, 2015

S.J.C.

extra stout posted:


The hatchet that Thunder Moose posted is probably around 40 or 50 bucks too (I think it's an Estwing), and while hickory handles are heavy, I'd bet the steel handle still adds another few pounds. If you're not planning to hike far and don't know how to replace a wooden haft, that's another good option. I avoid Fiskars hatchets even though they make good products, purely because I don't ever want to go from having an axe to having a thousand splinters of plastic handle and hoping the edge doesn't bounce into my ankle

It's an Estwing. I also sanded off the plasticy coating around the handle and just soaked it with neatsfoot oil. Much more reliable weather proofing but good grief was it tedious.

https://www.estwing.com/collections/axes-outdoor/products/leather-sportsmans-axe

rap music
Mar 11, 2006



Iíve been going through some poo poo lately which has made cut off most human contact and start getting into prepping. I guess my question is which prescription brain meds does it sound like I should be stockpiling?

Rutibex
Sep 9, 2001

Official Forums Path of Exile Expert


rap music posted:

Iíve been going through some poo poo lately which has made cut off most human contact and start getting into prepping. I guess my question is which prescription brain meds does it sound like I should be stockpiling?

weed is the drug of choice for the post apocalypse. once there is no government you can just put the seeds into the ground and make as much as you want

Pennywise the Frown
May 10, 2010



Upset Trowel

I'm screwed once I run out of my meds. I take like 7 or something. I won't die but it won't be fun for me or possibly people around me. Plus the withdrawals might suck.

dwnelson
Feb 28, 2020








Here are the contents of mine. Not pictured is my sleeping bag (which doesnít like staying compacted for long) and my radio (it sits on a charger). Orange dry bag has a coat packed into it, yellow dry bag has some spare radio gear - better antenna and backup batteries. The big red medkit is fairly fully kitted out, the tan one is belt mounted and pretty much entirely for things where speed matters - so, hemostasis and CPR gear as well as spare gloves that I can get to quickly. The other small tan belt bag is navigation gear - has a compass, GPS and spare batteries, a watch, and a light.

This thing is definitely on the heavy side, but I ruck 3 miles with it 2x/week in under 40m to make sure I stay in a condition to carry heavy stuff around like a doofus any time I feel like it.

One thing that gets overlooked a lot is having a photocopy of some ID and any paperwork youíd need if you got hit with a fire/earthquake/etc. like insurance information, as well as a little bit of cash. I also keep a spare pair of glasses in there because I am blind af lol

Rutibex
Sep 9, 2001

Official Forums Path of Exile Expert


dwnelson posted:







Here are the contents of mine. Not pictured is my sleeping bag (which doesnít like staying compacted for long) and my radio (it sits on a charger). Orange dry bag has a coat packed into it, yellow dry bag has some spare radio gear - better antenna and backup batteries. The big red medkit is fairly fully kitted out, the tan one is belt mounted and pretty much entirely for things where speed matters - so, hemostasis and CPR gear as well as spare gloves that I can get to quickly. The other small tan belt bag is navigation gear - has a compass, GPS and spare batteries, a watch, and a light.

This thing is definitely on the heavy side, but I ruck 3 miles with it 2x/week in under 40m to make sure I stay in a condition to carry heavy stuff around like a doofus any time I feel like it.

One thing that gets overlooked a lot is having a photocopy of some ID and any paperwork youíd need if you got hit with a fire/earthquake/etc. like insurance information, as well as a little bit of cash. I also keep a spare pair of glasses in there because I am blind af lol

looks like a very nice setup! hardware store tarp is nice, and if you can carry around something that heavy its going to be indestructible. I have two comments. have you tested that solar panel? in my experience portable solar panels are fairly rubbish and do no produce enough juice to be worth the weight. though i will admit solar panels may have become better since I last tried them. i do have an alternative you might consider, its is slightly heavier but provides much more consistent power in the bush:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YF6dR8fSGvU

Second thing, and this is a bit more minor but your water bottles could be improved. The hiker life-hack I always see is to use Smart Water bottles that you can get from a convenience store. The bottles are the perfect size for hiking, and they also have a standard type screw top that fits the Sawyer mini filter. They are also lighter than thick plastic bottles:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8vZfaez6vK0#t=177s

Rutibex fucked around with this message at 11:05 on Jul 23, 2020

dwnelson
Feb 28, 2020


Iíve tested the solar panels, but not as much as I should - thatís a good point! I know they work but I havenít used them consistently enough to get a good sense of how they work under different light conditions. Wrapped up inside the solar panels there is a charging rack for 4 AAs, so the panels donít necessarily need to work quickly, just ďat allĒ to trickle charge those batteries.

Good idea on the water bottles! I like the wide-mouth Nalgenes because itís easy to fill them/empty them with the wide mouth. I have two filters in there, the Katadyn is a pump so it can fill basically anything, and the Lifestraw has a squeeze bottle packed with it so I can squeeze water through it into the bottles. Cutting down weight is definitely priority 1A here though so that may very well be worth the change.

Internet Wizard
Aug 9, 2009

BANDAIDS DON'T FIX BULLET HOLES



You might want to look up the type of battery your radio uses, since most really don't like sitting on a charger for longer than necessary.

dwnelson
Feb 28, 2020


Itís a super crappy Baofeng so tbh I just swap the battery out periodically with a new one. Keep meaning to upgrade to a better HT and then realize... meh.

Pennywise the Frown
May 10, 2010



Upset Trowel

dwnelson posted:







Here are the contents of mine. Not pictured is my sleeping bag (which doesnít like staying compacted for long) and my radio (it sits on a charger). Orange dry bag has a coat packed into it, yellow dry bag has some spare radio gear - better antenna and backup batteries. The big red medkit is fairly fully kitted out, the tan one is belt mounted and pretty much entirely for things where speed matters - so, hemostasis and CPR gear as well as spare gloves that I can get to quickly. The other small tan belt bag is navigation gear - has a compass, GPS and spare batteries, a watch, and a light.

This thing is definitely on the heavy side, but I ruck 3 miles with it 2x/week in under 40m to make sure I stay in a condition to carry heavy stuff around like a doofus any time I feel like it.

One thing that gets overlooked a lot is having a photocopy of some ID and any paperwork youíd need if you got hit with a fire/earthquake/etc. like insurance information, as well as a little bit of cash. I also keep a spare pair of glasses in there because I am blind af lol

What backpack is that? It looks nice.

I probably shouldn't ask because I have a backpack buying problem and I don't even use them often.

dwnelson
Feb 28, 2020


Itís the Mystery Ranch Terraframe 80 and Iím not going to link because Iíd rather not remember how much it costs.

(I have the same problem and thought maybe this would finally be The Last One.)

Rutibex
Sep 9, 2001

Official Forums Path of Exile Expert


dwnelson posted:

Itís the Mystery Ranch Terraframe 80 and Iím not going to link because Iíd rather not remember how much it costs.

(I have the same problem and thought maybe this would finally be The Last One.)

once you reach galaxy brain level of hiker you realize that those ultra fancy packs are themselves weight you must carry on your back. the true best backpack is just a sac made of Cuban fiber with some straps on it
303 grams
https://zpacks.com/products/nero-backpack

vs

5.9 pounds
https://www.mysteryranch.com/terraframe-80-pack

Rutibex fucked around with this message at 18:57 on Jul 24, 2020

Pennywise the Frown
May 10, 2010



Upset Trowel

dwnelson posted:

Itís the Mystery Ranch Terraframe 80 and Iím not going to link because Iíd rather not remember how much it costs.

(I have the same problem and thought maybe this would finally be The Last One.)

Holy poo poo. Yeah, I'll have to pass on that one.

extra stout
Feb 24, 2005

ISILDUR's ERR


Rutibex posted:

once you reach galaxy brain level of hiker you realize that those ultra fancy packs are themselves weight you must carry on your back. the true best backpack is just a sac made of Cuban fiber with some straps on it
303 grams
https://zpacks.com/products/nero-backpack

vs

5.9 pounds
https://www.mysteryranch.com/terraframe-80-pack

This logic sort of works for some people, but there's no hip/waist transfer that actually works on that, it would rip if you put even a quarter of a deer in it, and ultimately if your goal is to carry up to 12 pounds of stuff for as cheap as possible, you should be making duct tape straps on a double lined trash bag

That Mystery Ranch 80 is 5.9 pounds but can carry 150, my own pack is under 4 pounds and can also carry more weight safely than I can actually hike a mile with, different strokes etc

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Rutibex
Sep 9, 2001

Official Forums Path of Exile Expert


extra stout posted:

it would rip if you put even a quarter of a deer in it


what percentage of a deer should I be able to carry in my backpack?

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