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Kylaer
Aug 3, 2007


Rutibex posted:


what percentage of a deer should I be able to carry in my backpack?

How much do you want to be able to carry back to the wagon?

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Internet Wizard
Aug 9, 2009

BANDAIDS DON'T FIX BULLET HOLES



Depends on how many people are in your hunting group

Rutibex
Sep 9, 2001

Official Forums Path of Exile Expert


Kylaer posted:

How much do you want to be able to carry back to the wagon?

Now I'm curious. Please post your bug-out wagon. I have been looking into carts and wagons but I could not find any suitable for the wilderness.

Kylaer
Aug 3, 2007


Sorry, I was only making an Oregon Trail joke, I don't actually know anything about wagons

dwnelson
Feb 28, 2020


I used to use a 5.11 bag without a hip belt, but after doing a GoRuck with it (60lbs in the pack pretty much continuously for ~10 hours and ~15 miles plus having to carry other crap and stop to do pushups/bear crawls/other terrible stuff from time to time) I decided that for any serious amount of weight/distance I just couldn’t have my shoulders be the only load bearing point.

Also that was a good Oregon Trail joke but I’m also sad we don’t get to hear about your kickass Bug-Out Wagon.

Pennywise the Frown
May 10, 2010



Upset Trowel

For a bug out bag I'd much rather have ruggedness over lightweight. If I were backpacking 20 miles a day then sure, weight would be crucial. But like stout said, putting a deer in it and not having an antler rip it apart is more important to me.

stealie72
Jan 10, 2007

Their eyes locked and suddenly there was the sound of breaking glass.


Are those Arc'teryx USMC packs still relatively cheap? They seem perfect for a bug out bag, especially when you cut the surpufluous stuff out of them.

Edit: they appear to have dried up. For a while you could get one for $150.

stealie72 fucked around with this message at 12:52 on Jul 25, 2020

extra stout
Feb 24, 2005

ISILDUR's ERR


Rutibex posted:


what percentage of a deer should I be able to carry in my backpack?

It does sound like an absurd problem but if you're out west hunting elk alone, the difference between 2 trips and 4 trips could easily be you passing out from heat exhaustion or not. Or you having daylight left. Even in a very cold climate with much smaller game (white tail) I would not have dragged my first deer if it was much heavier, or if my car was even one mile further away

Rutibex
Sep 9, 2001

Official Forums Path of Exile Expert


extra stout posted:

It does sound like an absurd problem but if you're out west hunting elk alone, the difference between 2 trips and 4 trips could easily be you passing out from heat exhaustion or not. Or you having daylight left. Even in a very cold climate with much smaller game (white tail) I would not have dragged my first deer if it was much heavier, or if my car was even one mile further away

That makes a lot of sense actually. I had just never considered I would be hunting any game that size I thought about getting a hunting crossbow, I can pick one of those up pretty easily. But a rifle would be a lot more complicated here in Canada. I already have a slingshot I can tag squirrels and small birds with.

Also I'm in a fairly urban environment at the moment, my bag mostly is for getting me out to a more remote area. I don't want to carry everything I will need to live a survivalist life on my back just yet, I would try and pick up supplies like a rifle once I get out of the city. Carrying that around is also a good way to look threatening.

Kylaer
Aug 3, 2007


Rutibex posted:

Also I'm in a fairly urban environment at the moment, my bag mostly is for getting me out to a more remote area. I don't want to carry everything I will need to live a survivalist life on my back just yet, I would try and pick up supplies like a rifle once I get out of the city. Carrying that around is also a good way to look threatening.

I would take this particular thought out of your plans. Any situation in which you need to obtain a firearm is a situation in which you will be unable to obtain a firearm - nobody is going to be willingly parting with their firearms if they think they're about to need them. The sole exception to this is if you have a friend or family member who lives out in the sticks who says something like "If you can make it to my house, I've got an extra rifle waiting for you."

This goes for other stuff too, honestly - food, equipment, toilet paper, anything that you plan on using or needing in an emergency, you should be sure to have on hand before the emergency arrives, because you are likely not to be able to obtain it after the fact. I'd just say this effect gets magnified for firearms specifically.

dwnelson
Feb 28, 2020


For anyone (especially lurkers) who is interested in building an emergency kit, the City of Seattle has a nice website with good advice: http://www.seattle.gov/emergency-management/prepare/prepare-yourself#buildingakit

(Full disclosure: I volunteer to teach some of their emergency preparedness classes, so I’m biased. Obviously not lately what with the rona but have for a while now.)

Rutibex
Sep 9, 2001

Official Forums Path of Exile Expert


Kylaer posted:

I would take this particular thought out of your plans. Any situation in which you need to obtain a firearm is a situation in which you will be unable to obtain a firearm - nobody is going to be willingly parting with their firearms if they think they're about to need them. The sole exception to this is if you have a friend or family member who lives out in the sticks who says something like "If you can make it to my house, I've got an extra rifle waiting for you."

This goes for other stuff too, honestly - food, equipment, toilet paper, anything that you plan on using or needing in an emergency, you should be sure to have on hand before the emergency arrives, because you are likely not to be able to obtain it after the fact. I'd just say this effect gets magnified for firearms specifically.

I have a good amount of "bug-in" supplies, many months of food and etc. I got all that in late February before people realized what was happening. What I am mostly concerned with at the moment is localized disasters or quarantines. Large city areas could be quarantined, and that is not necessarily an apocalyptic disaster for people already living in the countryside.

Officials will only set up roadblocks to stop people leaving by car. Going on foot over rough terrain I could get out, at least thats my theory. In that scenario I don't want to be caught with a gun

Rutibex fucked around with this message at 20:36 on Jul 25, 2020

BIG HORNY COW
Apr 11, 2003


Finally got around to packing the two Kelty Moraine 3200 packs I scored from the salvage area at the dump (thanks US Fish & Wildlife!). So far they've got all the extra camping gear we've acquired over the past few years in them, and are basically packed for a backpacking trip.

Definitely needs some work on the medical equipment, but already have two separate main first aid kits packed. Anything going into the packs would just be extra.

I think we're definitely in a shelter-in-place situation for the most part, but nice to have stuff ready to go if we have to get away from the house. Forest fires were huge last summer, we're near several active volcanoes and we had a 7.8 earthquake a few weeks ago (albeit a few hundred miles away).

Just feel like there's always something I'm forgetting to include, even with a checklist.

Rutibex
Sep 9, 2001

Official Forums Path of Exile Expert


BIG HORNY COW posted:

Definitely needs some work on the medical equipment, but already have two separate main first aid kits packed. Anything going into the packs would just be extra.

you would be surprised what you can replace in a medical kit with a bunch of bandannas. its better to carry around a bunch of bandanas that you can use for other things, than a bunch of medical tape/gauze to dressing wounds imho. its always best to get multiple uses out of every item you carry on your back.

though anti-bacterial cream is the one medical thing thats essential. your going to get some small cut or something eventually, and that will be a much bigger problem in the wilderness if it gets infected.

dwnelson
Feb 28, 2020


FWIW the order of priority for medical emergencies is MARCH:

Major hemorrhage (are they going to bleed to death?)
Airway (can they breathe?)
Respiration (are they actually breathing?)
Circulation (is blood moving?)
Head injury/hypothermia (did they get bonked? are they gonna freeze to death?)

That’s roughly the order of “what will kill you first” so if you’re trying to minimize your medical gear it’s a useful priority list.

That said - training weighs nothing! Here are ones I like:

M: stop the bleed (should be free)
A: basic life support (BLS)
R: BLS
C: BLS
H: just read a bit about spine immobilization - the tl;dr is that if you have any reason to suspect head/spine injury, don’t let the head/spine move. At all. Even a little bit. Strap it down, pad around it, keep them still. Hypothermia is fairly straightforward, keep them warm.

If you want to do the “next level” for all of these, NOLS’ Wilderness First Responder course is the usual go-to. It’s 10 days which is waaaayyyy too much work usually, BUT their textbook is quite good for a read - used copies are fairly cheap and they’re very understandable. They also have shorter classes if you’re interested in something more hands-on.

They have a table of courses here, which all list their textbooks and the amount of effort involved in the course: https://www.nols.edu/en/wilderness-medicine/wilderness-medicine-course-comparison-chart/

Comstar
Apr 20, 2007

But it was all right, everything was all right, the struggle was finished. He had won the victory over himself. He loved Princess Celestia


I've bought a small Bug out bag but as I live in a major city if I have to leave home with the family and need to stay away for a few days, we're most likely going to be in a refugee center. So I won't need a tent, because shelter will be available, but what would you pack for such a location? I'm thinking MRE's, power charger/wind up radio/solar panel charger for phones, long life dog food for the puppy in my life, copies of important documents, but what else would you include?

Internet Wizard
Aug 9, 2009

BANDAIDS DON'T FIX BULLET HOLES



Change of clothes, basic meds like ibuprofen and Imodium

Destroyenator
Dec 27, 2004
"Don't ask me lady, I live in beer"

Toothbrush and toothpaste, a blanket, rain ponchos, cash, maybe a small flashlight.

poeticoddity
Jan 14, 2007
"How nice - to feel nothing and still get full credit for being alive." - Kurt Vonnegut Jr. - Slaughterhouse Five

Comstar posted:

I've bought a small Bug out bag but as I live in a major city if I have to leave home with the family and need to stay away for a few days, we're most likely going to be in a refugee center. So I won't need a tent, because shelter will be available, but what would you pack for such a location? I'm thinking MRE's, power charger/wind up radio/solar panel charger for phones, long life dog food for the puppy in my life, copies of important documents, but what else would you include?

One of those collapsable bowls for your dog would be a good idea.

A few years ago I helped set up cots at a high school that was serving as a hurricane shelter.
Seeing a guy try to use a 20 on a vending machine makes me convinced a roll of quarters and some singles should be in there.
Clothes and basic toiletries plus some wipes you can use between showers.
Something to read and a deck of card would be a solid add, too.

dwnelson
Feb 28, 2020


I like Seattle’s list quite a bit: http://www.seattle.gov/emergency-management/prepare/prepare-yourself#buildingakit

devilmonk
May 21, 2003




Fire extinguisher?

dwnelson
Feb 28, 2020


They have separate lists for “to keep at home” and “to keep in a go bag” - you have to scroll down and expand the little “plus” icon things though, the website is not great.

Inceltown
Aug 6, 2019








Rutibex posted:

Now I'm curious. Please post your bug-out wagon. I have been looking into carts and wagons but I could not find any suitable for the wilderness.

I've heard goons have had success* with something like this for hauling poo poo.



* at getting laughed off the forums.

Stunt_enby
Feb 6, 2010

I SHIT UP EVERY THREAD I POST IN, IF YOU SEE ME IN FYAD CHAIN PROBATE ME


Inceltown posted:

I've heard goons have had success* with something like this for hauling poo poo.



* at getting laughed off the forums.
they're no longer a goon and we're still here, so who really succeeded in the end?

dwnelson
Feb 28, 2020


Stunt_enby posted:

they're no longer a goon and we're still here, so who really succeeded in the end?

pantslesswithwolves
Oct 27, 2008

Ba-dam ba-DUMMMMMM


Stunt_enby posted:

they're no longer a goon and we're still here, so who really succeeded in the end?

The best part of that saga was when a goon with some no poo poo backcountry guiding experience went item by item in Muerte’s kit list and explained what he was doing wrong. This forum has had its share of mic drop moments but that was the best.

AmbassadorofSodomy
Dec 30, 2016

SUCK A MALE CAMEL'S DICK WITH MIRACLE WHIP!!


pantslesswithwolves posted:

The best part of that saga was when a goon with some no poo poo backcountry guiding experience went item by item in Muerte’s kit list and explained what he was doing wrong. This forum has had its share of mic drop moments but that was the best.

Got a link to this?

pantslesswithwolves
Oct 27, 2008

Ba-dam ba-DUMMMMMM


wesleywillis posted:

Got a link to this?

Yes! I just remembered I had saved the post in a note on my phone.

https://forums.somethingawful.com/showthread.php?threadid=3714480&perpage=40&pagenumber=8#post444849645

Kontour posted:

Hi OP.

I don't imagine you will listen to this, but I'd like to give you a few pointers.

I hike for a living as a guide, I spend 250+ nights a year in the bush and I've been doing it for over 5 years now.

First off, I have to say I have absolutely no idea about the geography or climates of the areas you're going to be walking through, but I do have a lot of experience in hot, dry climates.

I'm going to approach this from my experience which is in remote areas with no support options, you say you are planning on stopping in towns which may mean some of what I say is redundant.

You say you are planning on carrying a 26l container with you and a camelbak. I you are walking a conservative 20km a day in 40 degrees celsius, I would expect that to last you around 3 days at a stretch. I climbed a mountain last year that was a 35km walk, and the temperature during the day hit 45. I went through 16 litres in about 18hrs, and didn't pee once. I probably needed to drink more. If you run out in that kind of heat, you will go into heat exhaustion extremely quickly, followed by heat stroke, and then death. Once you reach the point of heat stroke, you're in a very bad place and with no one to support you, you will not survive. At certain temperatures, not even water will save you, your body just can't cool itself effectively.

Lets look at your gear.

Most mountaineers and long distance hikers live and die by their gear, they test it, tweak it and get it completely right before bringing it into a situation where it actually matters. All of your stuff still has the tags on. Have you actually loaded up and camped out for even one or two nights with it?



Your pack is a Jansport. Jansport make gear for the "camp once or twice a year" market. Without seeing the harness setup I can't say for sure, but my gut says it is not a pack that's appropriate for what you plan on doing. You say it was the most comfortable one you tried on, but I don't get the feeling you really looked at that many. More important than how a pack is designed is how you adjust it and how it supports and transfers the weight of the contents on to your body. You would be much better off with a lightweight option from someone like Osprey or Black Diamond.

You have a Big Agnes tent, can you set it up in the dark? In the wind? In the rain? In all three at once? Do you have a repair kit? Have you seam sealed it?

You have a wide brimmed hat. Good. Ditch the umbrella.

Nothing gets me more frightened than an unopened first aid kit. Open it. Pull everything out, put it back in and make sure you know where everything is. Add things to it. I have never found a stock first aid kit that has everything I want to carry in it. Are you first aid qualified?

Your sleeping bag is too big and heavy for extended hiking. Lightweight small bags are expensive but given the distance you are walking, it would be prudent. Likewise your sleeping mat.

Do you have a liner for your bag? It will stop it smelling quite so bad after a few weeks.



You have insect repellant, get rid of the head net. Get rid of the camp towel, use a t-shirt.

You don't need bath wipes, whatever the gently caress they are.

You don't need camp soap, and having it just screams "I DON'T KNOW WHAT THE gently caress I'M DOING"

Hot water cleans pots and pans although since you're not taking a stove (something so retarded I'm having trouble comprehending it) you won't need to clean them.

Your lantern is too big and heavy, get one of the small flat magnetic ones.

That poncho will keep you dry for about 5 minutes in anything other than light rain, and anytime you start to sweat it will gather on the inside as condensation and make you wet anyway. I'm not sure how much rain you're planning on coming across, but a lightweight goretex something will be far more versatile.

Your shoes are awful. Get something better. I can't even really break down how inappropriate they are. Walking on the road is going to put a lot of strain on your joints and you need to have excellent cushioning in your footwear, I recommend superfeet. They will also probably wear out in about a week.

As an example here is one of my old boots, next to a new one.



I'd put 7 months on the one on the left and these are the top of the line hike boot in this brands line up.

I deal with people who make wrong gear choices every day, but they're also paying me to make sure they don't die. Your entire setup just screams inexperience and lack of research and time spent outdoors.

I'm not saying what you're attempting to do is impossible, but out of the gate you are drastically reducing your chances for success by not being prepared. Yes, people like that chick in Wild manage to do amazing things with no preparation SOMETIMES, but I've also had to rescue and help idiots like yourself when they've jumped into places and situations that they aren't prepared for.

Morale is also something you're going to struggle with. Hiking is one of those things that sounds easy and fun in your mind but rapidly changes once you start out. Have you ever been so incapacitated by giardia that you poo poo in your tent because you couldn't physically move? Have you ever been so tired hiking that in between steps you actually fall asleep for a second? Have you ever sat in a tent with the wind and the rain howling outside, stuck by yourself miles away from the nearest human being, set up your stove to eat something warm and found that you hadn't screwed the lid on the fuel bottle properly and now you have no fuel for the next 5 days? Have you ever laid in the fetal position in a sleeping bag, tears in your eyes wishing you were anywhere but here? I've done all of those things and while I've come out the other side glad I gained the experience, they were never transcendent events that changed who I was or any bullshit like that. They were just lovely, awful situations.

Take some time, do a whole bunch of extended hikes in fun places, get yourself prepared mentally and physically, get your gear sorted out, and then attempt something like this. As it stands you're being loving stupid.

Harry Potter on Ice
Nov 4, 2006
Someone on the internet doesn't like me





Lmfao the umbrella line brings it ALLLL back

ganglysumbia
Jan 29, 2005


Feel a little sorry for that guy. It’s tough starting out with this on your own, especially when you didn’t have a parent / Boy Scouts to teach a lot of basics.

I wish YouTube was around when I was figuring stuff out. The the green beret linked in the OP is some primo stuff. I also like this guy for more bushcraft knowledge.

https://youtu.be/nl5yJKyKFqU


I would also highly recommend a Mora for any BOB kit. Easy to maintain, cheap, and great general purpose knife. The carbon ones I would suggest keeping dry when not in use, and rubbing mineral oil on them for long term storage or else they tend to rust.

In regards to an ax a Fiskars x7 (35cm) is my go to. It’s real light, cheap, and you could split wood with it all day. For a BOB it does its job perfect for which your primary concern besides staying out of harms way is core temperature management, not going to build a log cabin with the thing. However with most kits it should be developed with your local environment / season in mind.

ganglysumbia fucked around with this message at 21:00 on Nov 8, 2020

Internet Wizard
Aug 9, 2009

BANDAIDS DON'T FIX BULLET HOLES



Hard disagree on saying the bath wipes and camp soap are worthless. They’re easily worth their weight when you get real gross and need to wash off your face and hands to feel a little more human. Wipes are also great for keeping your butthole from feeling real gross when your only other option is improvised toilet paper

Safety Dance
Sep 10, 2007

Five degrees to starboard!


The dude who posted that picture was going to quit his sedentary lifestyle and solve his depression by walking from San Francisco to Jacksonville, Florida if I remember correctly. He'd never actually cooked for himself or camped before. His plan for the desert was to push big jugs of water in a Walmart bicycle baby trailer.

His adventure started on a day-hiking trail in a park in Marin County and ended three or four days later in the same park. The Walmart bicycle trailer was a casualty of the cruel cruel mild hiking trail conditions, and was abandoned in the middle of the park to become somebody else's problem. He camped on a hill near a ranger's station (why they didn't kick him out I have no idea) and complained of altitude sickness, and finally threw in the towel and took an Uber back to his aunt's house when he ran out of trail mix.

Feel sorry for that guy because his mental illness led him down a really destructive path, not because he went to Walmart and bought one of everything in the camping section.

His voyage beings here here: https://forums.somethingawful.com/showthread.php?threadid=3714480&userid=0&perpage=40&pagenumber=23#post445403195

Edit: 4 days and 28 miles later, it ended:

Unicorncupcake posted:

"Please Read: Well today is possibly one of the most dissapointing days of my life. I woke up at 7 a.m. Ready to hit the trail and make an 8 mile trek to the Golden Gate Bridge. I walked down to the bathroom to freshen up and I just felt off balance I figured I had a bad night sleep or something and the next thing I know my entire left side of my body went limp and I fainted on the steps. Some hikers nearby saw me and said I looked awful and helped get me an Uber ride back to my aunts. For the first time in 4 days I was able to look at my body and it isn't good. My hips are literally black and blue and I'm constantly light headed. I have other issues that aren't pg as well. Then to top my day off I went to get some food in my stomache and my car overheated and poped coolest and smoke all over the place. I'm so dissapointed in myself and the fact I let everyone down. I know people were counting on me and backed me with donations and support. After having time to think about it once I lost my cart my mission was kind of lost. No longer would people stop to talk to me or take interest in what I was doing to them I was just another hiker. Maybe it is best to take a more direct approach to helping people. I don't plan to stop hiking or in my goal of raising awareness and money for mental health. What the last 5 days have taught me is invaluable and I'm going to start treating my body right and I really want to take a little time off every year to do section hikes. I wanted this badly enough I quit my job and left everything behind. I own just the clothes on my back, some camping supplies and a broken car. Words can't describe how awful I feel right now. I'm going to start my own foundation that shows people who struggle the joys of camping and how it can refresh the human spirit. Anyone who has donated to my trip please private message me so I can send your money back. Alternatively I can send it to Hike for mental health or if you want me to use it to help my own foundation, which I'll be writing up a business plan for once I get to Florida. Also if you purchased shirts I'll gladly refund your money if you wish. Please private message me on all matters above. Please do not leave negative comments I've had a very emotional and exhausting day as it is. Once again I'm sorry for letting you all down. I'm not giving up though."

Well that ended a lot faster more painlessly than I thought it would.

Safety Dance fucked around with this message at 01:24 on Nov 9, 2020

Hasselblad
Dec 13, 2017
NRA shill who thinks homeless people would love to live in migrant border camps. Help me realize I am a bigoted piece of shit.


Browsed through the thread and didn't notice anyone mention having at least a bare-bones water filtration canister in their pack.

Added to my bugout gear this Xmas with Leatherman Raptor Trauma Shears.
(Studied Wilderness First Responder that someone mentioned earlier in the thread, and these have been on my wish list for a while now)

Living in the mountains, I actually have 2 packs:
- My every day butt pack that gets tossed onto the jeep whenever I am out and about, that has basic trauma first aid stuff, emergency snacks, emergency blankets, water filter, fire starter, compass, heavy duty USAF knife with whetstone, Leatherman multi-tool, and .22 pistol for dispatching roadkill (sadly has come in handy for that purpose) and small game if needed
- My "bigger" bugout that consists of a USGI medic pack with more in-depth first aid/trauma stuff like blood clot bandages, sutures, and such. Also contains handheld shortwave handset, spare socks, lightweight tarp material, para-rope, freeze dried food, more water filtration canisters, instant coffee, and a few other items I cannot recall off the top of my head. It is the gear that will allow me to both address injuries as well as get me home, and suitably communicate if need be.

Both packs come with me when I am hunting. The pack rides nicely above the fanny pack.

The backpack mainly lives in my jeep, and depending on the time of year I keep suitable clothing, footwear, and shelter alongside it. Winter sees my microspikes and snowshoes existing there as well. Winter in the Utah mountains can be entertainingly brutal.

Hasselblad fucked around with this message at 23:38 on Jan 5, 2021

ganglysumbia
Jan 29, 2005


Hasselblad posted:

Browsed through the thread and didn't notice anyone mention having at least a bare-bones water filtration canister in their pack.

I would add that be aware of the ceramic filters can crack if they freeze with water inside. Nothing wrong with having them in your kit, but some back up purification tabs take up no space/weight.

Also living in the mountains, and my main goal bugging out in the winter time is not to bug out... But one piece of winter specific gear you won’t often see mentioned is crampons, not just for climbing up the vertical. If you’re walking over mountains in the winter things will be slippery.

Hasselblad
Dec 13, 2017
NRA shill who thinks homeless people would love to live in migrant border camps. Help me realize I am a bigoted piece of shit.


ganglysumbia posted:

I would add that be aware of the ceramic filters can crack if they freeze with water inside. Nothing wrong with having them in your kit, but some back up purification tabs take up no space/weight.

Also living in the mountains, and my main goal bugging out in the winter time is not to bug out... But one piece of winter specific gear you won’t often see mentioned is crampons, not just for climbing up the vertical. If you’re walking over mountains in the winter things will be slippery.

Yeah, most of my stuff I have with me in the winter is more geared toward getting to civilization with all my blood still in me and not frozen solid, than it is technically "bug out". That said, it affords me the ability to go more long term away from civilization if need be. Being up in the mountains I am more concerned about heavily populated areas "bugging out" in our direction.

and yeah, microspikes at the least are a good thing to have.

pmchem
Jan 21, 2010




Comstar posted:

I've bought a small Bug out bag but as I live in a major city if I have to leave home with the family and need to stay away for a few days, we're most likely going to be in a refugee center. So I won't need a tent, because shelter will be available, but what would you pack for such a location? I'm thinking MRE's, power charger/wind up radio/solar panel charger for phones, long life dog food for the puppy in my life, copies of important documents, but what else would you include?

seems like a particularly relevant question given the situation in Texas right now -- for people who need to get to another place, but may have access to an all-wheel drive vehicle so they don't just need a bug-out bag designed for walking/hiking

hemale in pain
Jun 5, 2010






Salad Prong

Internet Wizard posted:

Hard disagree on saying the bath wipes and camp soap are worthless. They’re easily worth their weight when you get real gross and need to wash off your face and hands to feel a little more human. Wipes are also great for keeping your butthole from feeling real gross when your only other option is improvised toilet paper

bit confused about no headnet too. like having a zillion midges in your face is truely a miserable experience and a headnet takes up zero room.

SuicidalSmurf
Feb 12, 2002




Internet Wizard posted:

Hard disagree on saying the bath wipes and camp soap are worthless. They’re easily worth their weight when you get real gross and need to wash off your face and hands to feel a little more human. Wipes are also great for keeping your butthole from feeling real gross when your only other option is improvised toilet paper

I bought one of these bottle mounted bidets for a 4 night backtracking trip last summer and will never look back. Aside from keeping my butt fresh, it also worked great as a camp shower to clean up a bit.

https://www.amazon.com/CuloClean-Po...14322959&sr=8-3

Sjs00
Jun 29, 2013

Yeah Baby Yeah !

yall want to see my BOB??
gently caress yeah you do



: electrical tape w 2 Harbinger wrist wraps
Philips head, adjustable wrench, 2 separate multi tool knives, pepper spray, backup wrist wrap, gloves, CVS card fuckin heater Am I missing something? And my vehicle is of course a skateboard.
This bug out bag has actually seen some use as you can imagine

Sjs00 fucked around with this message at 13:58 on Mar 17, 2021

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Pennywise the Frown
May 10, 2010



Upset Trowel

I can open carry an AR-15 here in WI but I can only carry super weak and small pepper spray. We have the tightest regulations on pepper spray in the country, yet I can open carry any gun I want lol.

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