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A 50S RAYGUN
Aug 21, 2011


sort of, i must have a few main leaks somewhere that i can't find via surface water.

i'm also trying to figure out where exactly all my loving tile drains empty into, and so far I've only found one that actually empties into my creek. the rest just seem to be putting the water ??? somewhere?

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my kinda ape
Sep 15, 2008

Everything's gonna be A-OK


Oven Wrangler

I think the typical method would be to add some sort of vibrant dye to the water.

A 50S RAYGUN
Aug 21, 2011


that's what I'm doing, hence me being blue. was just hoping there was a way that didn't involve my hands being blue for days

Uncle Lloyd
Sep 2, 2019



There are companies that will locate leaks from the surface—https://www.americanleakdetection.com is one I know of just because I have a family member who runs a franchise, but I assume there are others.

IDK what even a ballpark price would be though.

Uncle Lloyd
Sep 2, 2019



Schrödinger's heifer: an ailing animal separated in the evening and left overnight. May be considered simultaneously dead and alive until observed at morning chores.

Edit: gently caress, I killed her.

Uncle Lloyd fucked around with this message at 13:17 on Dec 31, 2020

French Canadian
Feb 23, 2004

Fluffy cat sensory experience


My wife and are are the typical couple who have good luck gardening and immediately think farming for ourselves would be a good idea

We also listened to some of One Straw Revolution and therefore are even more self confident.

I need a slap in the face I think...

Also all of Wisconsin's well water is contaminated because of farming and manure spreading and dairy. Can I farm without loving up the land?

crazypeltast52
May 5, 2010




Uncle Lloyd posted:

Schrödinger's heifer: an ailing animal separated in the evening and left overnight. May be considered simultaneously dead and alive until observed at morning chores.

Edit: gently caress, I killed her.

Oh no! Sorry to hear that.

my kinda ape
Sep 15, 2008

Everything's gonna be A-OK


Oven Wrangler

Uncle Lloyd posted:

Schrödinger's heifer: an ailing animal separated in the evening and left overnight. May be considered simultaneously dead and alive until observed at morning chores.

Edit: gently caress, I killed her.

Bummer, that's rough

Gotta do the humane thing though, just part of the job and it's the right thing to do.

CRUSTY MINGE
Mar 30, 2011
Chelsea Manning is a goddamned HERO


French Canadian posted:

My wife and are are the typical couple who have good luck gardening and immediately think farming for ourselves would be a good idea

We also listened to some of One Straw Revolution and therefore are even more self confident.

I need a slap in the face I think...

Also all of Wisconsin's well water is contaminated because of farming and manure spreading and dairy. Can I farm without loving up the land?

You can buy a bunch of prepared soil, then recycle it after mixing in compost and letting it stew for a while. You'll always be buying dirt though, if only to keep up with constant expansion. Then you can get an reverse osmosis filtration system for the water, remove all sorts of dissolved solids, and go about adding your own nutrients. If you're going that route, coco coir hydroponics or even deep water culture would be more prudent, but require much more attention than throwing a seed in some dirt and just watering daily.

By prepared soil I mean poo poo like Fox Farms soil, that runs about $35 for 1.5 cu feet, which is enough for two 5 gallon pots. If you'd like to know more, see the growing cannabis made fun and easy thread in TCC. The techniques are exactly the same as growing weed, nutrient ratios are pretty similar but everyone has their own experiments going. There's always going to be pollution after the fact, but you can compost a lot of plant matter and minimize impact in other ways, especially with water because RO filters are anything but cheap.

French Canadian
Feb 23, 2004

Fluffy cat sensory experience


CRUSTY MINGE posted:

You can buy a bunch of prepared soil, then recycle it after mixing in compost and letting it stew for a while. You'll always be buying dirt though, if only to keep up with constant expansion. Then you can get an reverse osmosis filtration system for the water, remove all sorts of dissolved solids, and go about adding your own nutrients. If you're going that route, coco coir hydroponics or even deep water culture would be more prudent, but require much more attention than throwing a seed in some dirt and just watering daily.

By prepared soil I mean poo poo like Fox Farms soil, that runs about $35 for 1.5 cu feet, which is enough for two 5 gallon pots. If you'd like to know more, see the growing cannabis made fun and easy thread in TCC. The techniques are exactly the same as growing weed, nutrient ratios are pretty similar but everyone has their own experiments going. There's always going to be pollution after the fact, but you can compost a lot of plant matter and minimize impact in other ways, especially with water because RO filters are anything but cheap.

Thanks. Re: the water, I meant more than farming causes the water to get hosed up. I'm not so worried about using said water and we'd probably not farm in our current state of Wisconsin (as we'll be moving soon). But I'm just curious about how to avoid doing similar damage myself, to the water table, etc.

And why do I have to buy soil? It doesn't replenish on its own if I do things properly? I realize cash crops gently caress up the soil and pull nutrients and that's why you can to inject fertilizer. But for sustainable farming, I have to still buy new soil and mix in perpetually?

CRUSTY MINGE
Mar 30, 2011
Chelsea Manning is a goddamned HERO


You don't have to truck in top soil or buy pallets of bagged stuff, soil restores with time, but it largely depends on how long it's left to lie dormant, what kind of restoration work you do, or what most people do, rotate crops. You would still be supplementing soil with fertilizers if you were going to cash crops. Then you have pesticides, herbicides, all that jazz if you want to work any substantial land. Also tilling, discing, plowing top soil.

Going with bagged soil would be more along the lines of small gardening, greenhouse, learning ropes because it's easier to have success with on a smaller scale. Pests and plant diseases are easier to manage on a small scale too, and less likely in a greenhouse environment.

You could always get large plots in a dry area with high water plates and run circular driven irrigation around a well, but that'd be more damage than small scale. Start small and work to grow.

My grandparents worked corn and soybean rotations, but still dumped tons of anhydrous ammonia in the fields every year, still sprayed round up, and we'd torch the stalks every year until the mid-2000s. They had about 800 acres and it was a chore every year. Starting small will be less likely to burn you out, because everyone was fed up by mid-october every harvest.

xylo
Feb 21, 2007


Feels good sending in that final payment on the tractor. Time to start saving for more implements and a 5R

Weltlich
Feb 13, 2006


Grimey Drawer

xylo posted:

Feels good sending in that final payment on the tractor. Time to start saving for more implements and a 5R

Uncle Lloyd
Sep 2, 2019



Cows like eating and sleeping and getting scratches. They're creatures after my own heart.

Pharnakes
Aug 14, 2009


French Canadian posted:

Thanks. Re: the water, I meant more than farming causes the water to get hosed up. I'm not so worried about using said water and we'd probably not farm in our current state of Wisconsin (as we'll be moving soon). But I'm just curious about how to avoid doing similar damage myself, to the water table, etc.

And why do I have to buy soil? It doesn't replenish on its own if I do things properly? I realize cash crops gently caress up the soil and pull nutrients and that's why you can to inject fertilizer. But for sustainable farming, I have to still buy new soil and mix in perpetually?

Regenerative agriculture is most definitely a thing. I'm in Europe so I can't directly tell you who to look at in the US if you are interested but I know there are people doing impressive things.


The work of Alan Savory was what got me interested in the approach. After experimenting myself I don't necessarily agree with everything they say but it's a good point to start. So yes there absolutely is a viable alternative to hi input hi output "modern" agriculture.

https://savory.global/

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Uncle Lloyd
Sep 2, 2019



It's the most wonderful time of the year - the end of the winter manure spreading ban.

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