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Elmnt80
Dec 30, 2012

OH NOOOO!





After talking to both AI boating threads, they feel they're more comfortable staying where they are. However they feel (and I agree) that a general boating thread is a good thing to have in TGO. I hope I do a better job starting this thread than I did with my several year old AI thread!

So since we have a kayak thread and an inflatable thread, its time we have a bigger boat thread. Talk about your fishing boats, cruising on your pontoon boat, sailing your boat with windpower or even living on your big ol boat. All boats are welcome here! Boating is a fun activity to do both solo and as a group, however its always important to be safe. Always make sure you know your local boating regulations, have your proper safety gear and check it regularly.

The federal regulations for US are here in this handy document from the USCG: https://www.uscgboating.org/images/420.PDF
The UK boating regulations can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/owning-a-boat/overview
If posters from other countries want to contribute I'll be more than happy to add them here!

If you want to talk about fixing boats, feel free to stop by the AI boat thread: https://forums.somethingawful.com/showthread.php?threadid=3682371
There is also a thread about racing sailboats in AI as well: https://forums.somethingawful.com/showthread.php?threadid=3923325

If there's anything you want me to add to the op, just let me know. Now lets post some boat stuff.

Elmnt80 fucked around with this message at 04:17 on Jul 18, 2020

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Elmnt80
Dec 30, 2012

OH NOOOO!





And just because I love this boat and want to share it with more people, have the post that encouraged my original boat thread in AI.

Preoptopus posted:

Boats with cool engines you say?

Feruccio Lamborghini bought the most beautiful boat Riva Aquarama in the world and said gently caress a Chrysler v8s, I need a pair of my 4.0l v12's


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0LkQbVTWr4g

I should mention that normally thoes boats go from 300 to 600 thousand dollars. I cant imagine what that one would be worth.

monsterzero
May 12, 2002
-=TOPGUN=-
Boys who love airplanes Boys who love boys


Lipstick Apathy


I have a boat and it is v outdoors. This is where I woke up this morning.

Elmnt80
Dec 30, 2012

OH NOOOO!







This is my dumb boat (please ignore the dumb jerks I hung around with at the time standing in the way). Its a 1988 17 1/2 ft actioncraft flats boat with a 90hp oil injected yamaha pushing it. Sadly I don't actually have any recent boating adventures to post about with it since its been sitting in a field for the better part of a decade waiting for me to have the time and money to fix it. One day I'll figure out what to do with it.

Pharnakes
Aug 14, 2009


This is Twinklamee, an Orkney built larch on oak 24'6" gunter rig cabin cruiser that my father swapped for a rover sports car he won in a raffle nearly 20 years ago, and which took us 10 years or so of sporadic work to restore after she had been rotting in a marina park with no cover for nearly 15 years.

She still leaks like a sieve when we put her in for the season, which was extremely alarming the first time, but she takes up within a day and then she is remarkably dry.



My father insists on referring to her as Twink, and no one really has the heart to explain to him what most people must think when he tells them about his boat called Twink.





2 years ago we took her on our first real cruise to St Kilda (absolutely fascinating place, well worth the effort to get to if you ever have an opportunity).

It was the first time any of us had really been sailing, we went in late June just a few days after the solstice and sailing along in the middle of the "night" handling the boat by myself while my father and uncle slept was extremely awesome and, I don't know, solemn somehow? Of course there is no night really, I took this picture at about 3:30 am I think.



With the kind of hazy lighting, being by myself with no reference point but a compass and the dolphins alongside, with only the sail up I could hear their squeaking with the hull acting like an amplifier, and even the swishing of their tails in the water made for a sense of complete unreality. I will definitely remember those hours for the rest of my life

We saw a lot of dolphins on that trip, I only had a mobile but still got some pretty ok pictures I think.





Forgive the thumb, I was excited




We also saw this extremely gorgeous lady at Loch Boisdale, and felt very inferior.



Although I did notice she was starting to go around the gunnels, the amount of work and or money it takes to maintain wooden boats is insane even by boat standards.

monsterzero
May 12, 2002
-=TOPGUN=-
Boys who love airplanes Boys who love boys


Lipstick Apathy

I can only imagine how much work it is to keep a wooden boat up. I've got about 15-linear feat of varnish and I'm failing.

Got any pictures of Twink under sail?

Hadlock
Nov 9, 2004





Is this where we post the boat pics



TheFluff
Dec 13, 2006

FRIENDS, LISTEN TO ME
I AM A SEAGULL
OF WEALTH AND TASTE


This is my boat in its natural habitat:



I don't race, I just spend the better part of summer on it. The Baltic Sea is a magical place for about three months a year, and while my boat isn't much of a blue-water craft, it's almost literally made for these archipelagos.



You can get a lot of sailing done at high latitudes; this photo was taken around midnight. It never really gets fully dark well into late July.



I'd post more but I won't be home for another week or so.

TheFluff fucked around with this message at 20:56 on Jul 18, 2020

Pharnakes
Aug 14, 2009


monsterzero posted:

I can only imagine how much work it is to keep a wooden boat up. I've got about 15-linear feat of varnish and I'm failing.

Got any pictures of Twink under sail?

Sadly no, at the time I didn't have a drone, and this year I've been too busy working for us to get her in the water.

Crunchy Black
Oct 24, 2017

CASTOR: Uh, it was all fine and you don't remember?
VINDMAN: No, it was bad and I do remember.




I race on a few boats.











crazypeltast52
May 5, 2010





monsterzero
May 12, 2002
-=TOPGUN=-
Boys who love airplanes Boys who love boys


Lipstick Apathy

Pharnakes posted:

Sadly no, at the time I didn't have a drone, and this year I've been too busy working for us to get her in the water.

Yeah, I don't have any good pictures either. I need to drop a friend on the bathroom barge and do some fly-bys when the wind is right

Femtosecond
Aug 2, 2003



Saw that there's a boat for sale in my town with the name "Shenanigans" written on the side and I want to buy it for that reason alone even tho I've never sailed before.

Big Taint
Oct 19, 2003



There is no better reason to buy a boat, do it.

Karma Comedian
Feb 2, 2012

Dr. E/N, PhD




Signed contracts to buy a Coronado 35ms today

Baronash
Feb 29, 2012

So what do you want to be called?

Big boats suck. Small boats are where it's at.

I borrowed this sunfish for the latter half of the summer to learn how to sail, and it's a fun little boat. It's especially nice in that I get to keep it on the lake, so it takes all of 5 minutes to get out on the water.

That said, I'm starting to think about buying a boat so that I can travel to larger lakes than the oversized pond that I live on. I'm considering a Laser or a Sunfish, but I've also been taking a look at slightly larger boats with a bit more space and a defined seating area so that my wife and I can actually get comfortable and spend a few hours on the water. Are there any sailing goons who know of boats that might fit the bill?

Big Taint
Oct 19, 2003



Iíd look for cheap Flying Juniors or 420s. Both are very popular 2-person boats for junior/college sailing and there are many thousands of them. They are pretty old hat so you can sometimes find people/clubs upgrading to newer stuff and get them very cheap. I got my FJ for $200 on eBay, and have spent <$1k replacing all the running rigging and some hardware and generally sprucing it up.



They will plane downwind in enough breeze, so they are pretty sporty but you wonít be playing with the Moths. Enough clubs use them that thereís tons of support for them, easy to get parts and sails, etc.

Big Taint fucked around with this message at 22:05 on Aug 18, 2020

Baronash
Feb 29, 2012

So what do you want to be called?

Big Taint posted:

Iíd look for cheap Flying Juniors or 420s. Both are very popular 2-person boats for junior/college sailing and there are many thousands of them. They are pretty old hat so you can sometimes find people/clubs upgrading to newer stuff and get them very cheap. I got my FJ for $200 on eBay, and have spent <$1k replacing all the running rigging and some hardware and generally sprucing it up.



They will plane downwind in enough breeze, so they are pretty sporty but you wonít be playing with the Moths. Enough clubs use them that thereís tons of support for them, easy to get parts and sails, etc.

That looks like a great size, I'll keep my eyes out.

Hadlock
Nov 9, 2004





Call the head of your local-ish laser fleet and pick their brains about what fleets are most popular in your area. In my case, the local fleets were (in no particular order)

Snipe
Laser
Butterfly (basically a sunfish)
Lightning
Flying Scot

At another lake there were (these are keelboats)

J/24
J/22
Catalina 22

Where I'm at now popular dinghies

El Toro
RS Aero
RS Feva

Figure out what's racing what and when. Before you totally dismiss the idea of racing, just consider it an excuse to get out on the water. Sailing for a lot of people, it's like the gym. You show up a couple of times, get discouraged, and then never use the thing again

If you're "racing", then you have a set date to go to a lake with 5-10 other people, put together your boats together, drink beers, swap stories, and then all go sailing together in the same direction at the same time

Dues are usually a hundred bucks a year or something. The end result is that you go sailing at least once a month, and you're doing it consistently, plus now there's a ranking assigned to your name and you can gamify it a bit and try to not be DFL (dead loving last). Plus you will learn more in one weekend about sail trim than you did all last year, in one regatta

Also, Hobie Cats are alarmingly cheap and fun, you can pick up a Hobie 16 for under a thousand dollars including the trailer, and replace the trampoline for $300 or so. Also now you get to argue with everyone wether monohulls or catamarans are better, and understand bunch of in jokes in season 4 of F is for Family. Side bonus: it's big enough that you and your date can lay down on it at the same time


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DS76mOQQ2Eo

Hadlock fucked around with this message at 00:00 on Aug 21, 2020

spwrozek
Sep 4, 2006

Sail when it's windy



I had a boat when I lived in Michigan. I was in college and working construction and working on a lake. The home owner mentioned that the neighbors husband passed away 4 years previous and the boat had just sat there. $400 and borrowing my uncles trailer and I had a boat. I don't get to sail much anymore living in Denver. When I get back to Michigan I usually just end up cruising on my dad's pontoon (also good boats).

I don't really have too many photos of the boat but here I am with my brother and his girlfriend



Here we are on the Rio de la Plata with Buenos Aires in the back ground last year. Awesome stuff.



quote:

Also, Hobie Cats are alarmingly cheap and fun, you can pick up a Hobie 16 for under a thousand dollars including the trailer, and replace the trampoline for $300 or so. Also now you get to argue with everyone wether monohulls or catamarans are better, and understand bunch of in jokes in season 4 of F is for Family. Side bonus: it's big enough that you and your date can lay down on it at the same time

Hobie Cats are the best. The only issue with old school Hobie 16's is they can be a pain to flip over by yourself. If I get a boat again it will probably be a Hobie 16.

spwrozek fucked around with this message at 15:12 on Aug 22, 2020

El Grillo
Jan 3, 2008


Fun Shoe

drat I miss boats. If more of you goons got boat pics and stuff keep posting them would you.


Pharnakes posted:

This is Twinklamee, an Orkney built larch on oak 24'6" gunter rig cabin cruiser that my father swapped for a rover sports car he won in a raffle nearly 20 years ago, and which took us 10 years or so of sporadic work to restore after she had been rotting in a marina park with no cover for nearly 15 years.

She still leaks like a sieve when we put her in for the season, which was extremely alarming the first time, but she takes up within a day and then she is remarkably dry.



My father insists on referring to her as Twink, and no one really has the heart to explain to him what most people must think when he tells them about his boat called Twink.





2 years ago we took her on our first real cruise to St Kilda (absolutely fascinating place, well worth the effort to get to if you ever have an opportunity).

It was the first time any of us had really been sailing, we went in late June just a few days after the solstice and sailing along in the middle of the "night" handling the boat by myself while my father and uncle slept was extremely awesome and, I don't know, solemn somehow? Of course there is no night really, I took this picture at about 3:30 am I think.



With the kind of hazy lighting, being by myself with no reference point but a compass and the dolphins alongside, with only the sail up I could hear their squeaking with the hull acting like an amplifier, and even the swishing of their tails in the water made for a sense of complete unreality. I will definitely remember those hours for the rest of my life

We saw a lot of dolphins on that trip, I only had a mobile but still got some pretty ok pictures I think.





Forgive the thumb, I was excited




We also saw this extremely gorgeous lady at Loch Boisdale, and felt very inferior.



Although I did notice she was starting to go around the gunnels, the amount of work and or money it takes to maintain wooden boats is insane even by boat standards.
This is bloody stunning

Turmoilx
Nov 24, 2015

I possibly could of done something more effective with this money but I'm not sure.


i got boat questions.

what kind of boat can make it across the North Atlantic Ocean safely from Florida to somewhere ~over there~ lets say 4100 miles example i used some site to get that number. i don't know anything about Boats but im guessing a Sailboat you would not make it alive as an inexperienced-

guy big bad waves n stuff killer! so my next problem i think of is fuel would only a fuel boat be able to do it or should you just go crazy and make some kind of solar powered invention (boat) to ride the waves from one side to the other?

pirates? -I'm definitely not a felon or anything, just asking for a friend literally

Crunchy Black
Oct 24, 2017

CASTOR: Uh, it was all fine and you don't remember?
VINDMAN: No, it was bad and I do remember.




sounds like your friend has a Titanic style deathwish

Turmoilx
Nov 24, 2015

I possibly could of done something more effective with this money but I'm not sure.


now questioning it, learning how sailing works sounds like a great thing to know and experience

Wibla
Feb 16, 2011


Turmoilx posted:

now questioning it, learning how sailing works sounds like a great thing to know and experience

This is entirely correct.

seance snacks
Mar 29, 2007



Turmoilx posted:

what kind of boat can make it across the North Atlantic Ocean safely from Florida to somewhere ~over there~ lets say 4100 miles example i used some site to get that number. i don't know anything about Boats but im guessing a Sailboat you would not make it alive as an inexperienced-

Disclaimer, I am not at ALL an expert. I just bought my first sailboat a few months ago, haven't even taken it out yet due to paperwork.

But, when I was looking at sailboats I asked my knowledgeable friend that exact same question, and his response was "Any boat could do it if the weather was perfect." Point being the importance of seasonal timing if one were to attempt something like that.

Here's a dude on youtube who did California -> Hawaii in a 23-foot cruiser

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yUi0gsxVHZM

HenryJLittlefinger
Jan 31, 2010

stomp clap



Oh are we on the precipice of another goon saga?

Dr. Klas
Sep 30, 2005
Operating.....done!

Well, some Finns crossed the Atlantic with a 4,5m long motor boat with a 36hp outboard in 1970. https://www.barcheamotore.com/medmen-crossed-the-ocean-on-a-4-metre-boat/?lang=en

And Sven Yrvind has crossed oceans in 5-6m long sailboats several times.
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sven_Yrvind

Not that Iíd recommend it or say that itís safe or anything, but it can be done in quite ridiculous boats

Hadlock
Nov 9, 2004





The smallest practical boat to cross the atlantic would be something in the 27' range. Folkboat (wooden) or International Folkboat (fiberglass) from there you have stuff like the Pearson 30. There's a musty Cal 40 in Florida that's headed to the scrap yard later this month


classic boat posted:

Folkboat to Antigua: restore, sail, race and win

Boatbuilder Leo Goolden restored a clapped-out Folkboat, sailed her to Antigua and won everything. Veni, vidi, vivi, as they  say!

I hoist the mainsail with the mooring lines still tied. A few curious faces peer over the railings. “Is that a Folkboat?” says an old fella’ with a bag of chips. “Where you off to?” “France!” I say. He gives me an odd look and wanders off down the stone quay. I hoist the jib, untie the spring, and flick the bow line over the bollard.

I back the jib, holding the clew to leeward on the foredeck until the bow falls off a little, and then give the wall a good kick from the stern. I take up the slack in the main sheet as Lorema bears away and the sails fill, the wake widens, and I hear the sound of the water accelerating over the clinker planks.

As I pass Trefusis point, I turn and wave goodbye to Falmouth and Cornwall and all the friends I have made there – until next time. After two years it feels like home, but I am finally embarking on the trip I have planned for so long, and I can barely contain my excitement and nerves. I am heading south, destination unknown, and it feels good.

Unbelievably, that was nearly 10 months ago now, and as I write this on a palm shaded patio in the Caribbean, with a cup of tea and a view of my boat Lorema in the bay down below, I have to look back and try to piece together the defining points of the journey, and shape them into a digestible story.

https://www.classicboat.co.uk/articles/folkboat-to-antigua-restore-sail-race-and-win/

https://www.yachtingworld.com/features/solo-across-the-atlantic-in-a-folkboat-67743

Other contenders: Express 27, J/80, Santa Cruz 27, J/35 etc etc. Older Beneteaus from the 80s are built like brick poo poo houses. Then there's the classic list of Robert Perry bluewater cruisers, the Dana 24, the leaky teaky choi lee range etc etc

some greybeard nutjob just got done doing a (third!) circumnavigation in a Moore 24, which is really an oversized dinghy with a slightly less damp spot below to warm soup and maybe take a poo poo without falling overboard

27' seems to be the sweet spot of not small enough you want to kill yourself after 4 hours on the water, but also not so big that you can't afford to sail it 50 weeks a year on a $50,000/yr budget and actually keep up with 95% of the maintenance

With modern weather routing and an efficient sailplan you can cross oceans without spilling your champagne

Turmoilx
Nov 24, 2015

I possibly could of done something more effective with this money but I'm not sure.


seance snacks posted:

Disclaimer, I am not at ALL an expert. I just bought my first sailboat a few months ago, haven't even taken it out yet due to paperwork.

But, when I was looking at sailboats I asked my knowledgeable friend that exact same question, and his response was "Any boat could do it if the weather was perfect." Point being the importance of seasonal timing if one were to attempt something like that.

Here's a dude on youtube who did California -> Hawaii in a 23-foot cruiser

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yUi0gsxVHZM

thanks i will enjoy this video just stopped it to say im shocked there are "sea sick patches" you can put on

Crunchy Black
Oct 24, 2017

CASTOR: Uh, it was all fine and you don't remember?
VINDMAN: No, it was bad and I do remember.




Donít forget C&C if mentioning exceptionally well built boats youíd trust your life to.

Turmoilx
Nov 24, 2015

I possibly could of done something more effective with this money but I'm not sure.


is sailboat lean a flex of some sort? i have seen this in a few listings browsing them i don't really understand it yet.

when you sail solo how does controlling what the boat does when sleeping work

Hadlock
Nov 9, 2004





Turmoilx posted:

is sailboat lean a flex of some sort? i have seen this in a few listings browsing them i don't really understand it yet.

when you sail solo how does controlling what the boat does when sleeping work

I'm not sure what you're asking exactly but I'll attempt. The keel is a counter weight at the bottom of the boat that keeps it from tipping over when the wind "t-bones" the boat, or in sailing terms, when reaching or close hauled. When the wind is ~10mph or less there's not much tipping force from the wind, but as you approach 20-30mph the boat would tip completely over without the keel.

Tipping or "leaning" is a standard way of traveling, and in fact they're designed to go fastest when leaning at a 12-15° angle. If you look closely at blue water or race boats you'll often see the floor of the cockpit is angled at 15° to assist with standing for long periods of time at that angle

The main sheet/traveler are used to reduce lean to 15°. If you exceed your main sheet/traveler adjustments, you need to "reef" to reduce sail area to maintain 15° lean

Solo: check out https://www.sfbaysss.org/main/ it's it's own sport, they have their own bb forums even

Basically you buy a boat with an autopilot, or retrofit one. If you have a wheel, the autopilot system costs about $2500, if you have a tiller (stick) then it's only about $350-700. I bought one used for $150. Tiller autopilots can be installed by a lay person, wheel autopilots are pretty involved. There are hold course buttons, tack/gybe buttons, and adjust course 5/10° buttons. Some auto pilots can talk to your wind indicators $$$

Hadlock
Nov 9, 2004





Double postin'

People who solo race sailboats are some of the gooniest motherfuckers I've ever met

Most people who are doing competitive sailing are management types ordering around a crew of people, and if they don't win it's the crews fault

Solo sailors are an entirely different breed, usually programmers or librarians or some people hating profession. If you don't win you are the single point of failure

There's a race called "Single Handed Transpac" which is a biannual race from San Fransisco, across the open Pacific ocean for 12-16 days, to Hawaii. Usually about 20 people enter each time

Crunchy Black
Oct 24, 2017

CASTOR: Uh, it was all fine and you don't remember?
VINDMAN: No, it was bad and I do remember.




To build of Hadlock's point, keep in mind that in the vast majority of cases, the keel is essentially acting as an airfoil, just in water, it's helping you to generate lift and moving you in the direction you want to go. There's also the notion of waterline--you want to have the longest contiguous bit of hull you can in the water, but only on the leeward (non-weather) side as this allows for less overall wetted surface but what does touch the water allows you to spread the forces more effectively. More or less.

This is also why on multihulls you'll see them "flying a hull (or ama)" getting unnecessary drag out of the water. I guess the easiest way to think about this might be to watch a MotoGP race and see how they lean into the corners. We just do that when going in a straight line lol

However, there is a point of diminishing returns when you are so heeled you lose control, either effectively or completely (a wipeout). Basically, imagine you're sitting on a cliff's edge and...

Big Taint
Oct 19, 2003



For displacement boats (most sailboats) your speed is limited by the hull speed which is 1.34*sqrt of the waterline. Basically your hull makes a wave in the water, longer hull = bigger wave = faster. Since most boats have a reverse shear bow and curvature to the hull, when you heel the waterline increases (asymmetrically). So in light wind when the boat isnít being heeled much by wind pressure, the crew will move to the leeward side to induce heel and get the benefits of the longer waterline/less wetted surface.

Hadlock
Nov 9, 2004





Crunchy Black posted:

Basically, imagine you're sitting on a cliff's edge and...

Imagine four crew on the edge of a boat. Say a direct copy of the ball crew nearest the bow is sent to the back of the line of crew and takes the place of the pit. The formerly pit becomes the jib trimmer, the jib becomes the rail meat, and the fourth falls off the cliff becomes the foredeck. Time works the same way.

Karma Comedian
Feb 2, 2012

Dr. E/N, PhD




Hadlock posted:

Imagine four crew on the edge of a boat. Say a direct copy of the ball crew nearest the bow is sent to the back of the line of crew and takes the place of the pit. The formerly pit becomes the jib trimmer, the jib becomes the rail meat, and the fourth falls off the cliff becomes the foredeck. Time works the same way.

Sailing is a flat circle.

Pham Nuwen
Oct 30, 2010




Things like this make me want to make really stupid decisions: https://sfbay.craigslist.org/eby/boa/d/richmond-26-nordic-folkboat/7250494554.html

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Hadlock
Nov 9, 2004






There are worse decisions you could make

The marina just north of there is called brickyard cove, it's both pretty nice and has really cheap rates, plus you don't have to motor for 15 minutes in and out of the channel to go sailing

Should be a snap to get out and sail a lap around red rock island. It's a wooden boat so you can repair anything yourself with hand tools, some cotton and a can of paint

Also, as mentioned before, it's less than 27' so all the replacement parts are going to be very affordable, and if you get hit in the head with the boom or the wind picks up, you'll be able to handle things better

Of course all this advice goes out the window if you decide to pay others to maintain your boat for you, and/or the owner is lying and the hull is significant rotten

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